Church, immigrant groups plan to airlift Haitian orphans to South Florida

BY ALFONSO CHARDY AND SERGIO BUSTOS
The Miami Herald

In a move mirroring Operation Pedro Pan in the 1960s, Catholic Charities and other South Florida immigrant rights organizations are planning an ambitious effort to airlift possibly thousands of Haitian children left orphaned in the aftermath of Tuesday's horrific earthquake.

"We will use the model we used 40 years ago with Pedro Pan to bring these orphans to the United States to give them a lifeline, a bright and hopeful future," Catholic Charities Legal Services executive director Randolph McGrorty said at a news conference in the offices of Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart.

"Given the enormity of what happened in Haiti, a priority is to bring these orphaned children to the United States," he said.

Archdiocese of Miami officials and other local organizations have already identified a temporary shelter in Broward County to house the children, McGrorty said.

He also said they had been in contact with the Obama administration to assist in bringing the children from Haiti with humanitarian visas.

Operation Pedro Pan was launced on Dec. 26, 1960, as part of a successful clandestine effort to spirit children out of Fidel Castro's new Cuba as communist indoctrination was spreading into Catholic and private schools.

By the time it ended 22 months later, the unique exodus of children -- ages 5 to 17 -- had brought 14,048 unaccompanied Cuban minors to America, with the secret help of the U.S. government, which funded the effort and supplied the visa waivers, and the Catholic church, which promised to care for the children.

The late Monsignor Bryan O. Walsh, a Miami priest, was considered the father of the effort.

As the children filtered into Miami and their numbers swelled, many went to live with relatives and family friends, but others were sent to Miami-Dade group homes and camps called Florida City, Kendall and Matecumbe. They were then relocated across the country to archdioceses in places like Nebraska, Washington and Indiana.

There, they went to live in orphanages, foster homes and schools until their parents could find a way out of Cuba. Sometimes the separation was brief; sometimes it lasted years.

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airlift of Haitian "orphans"

I believe all of us must do something to help with this terrible situation in Haiti.
However, I am concerned about any "orphans" being airlifted to south Florida.
1) How do they know these children are orphans or merely seperated from their families?
2) Instead of spending the money to "airlift" the children out, why not spend that money alloted for this to start a much needed camp with food, medical and other supplies. Isn't it just as easy and cheap to ship in goods as to ship the "orphans" out?
3) Who decides what children go and what their fate is after they arrive in S. Florida?
4) Who are the children staying with in S. Florida?

While this story sounds great, I am skeptical about the true motives behind "airlifting the orphans" out of Haiti.

rushed decisions

I honestly think the story sounds horrible for the very reasons you outlined. Rushed decisions like an airlift can only cause more problems than they solve.

outside the U.S.

Yesterday, the Dutch government made the irresponsible decission to allow adoption agencies Nederlandse Adoptie Stichting and Wereldkinderen to fly to Haiti and retrieve 56 children that were in the process of being adopted. See: Dutch Government allows new 'Babylift' operation to get children for adoption from Haiti.

French prospective adoptive parents are demanding the same response from their government

Canadian member of parliament Olivia Chow wants Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney to issue emergency visas.

Only Italy seems to be reasonable in the current situation, note there are no pending adoptions from Haiti in Italy:

In recent days, after the tragic earthquake that devastated Haiti, came to the CAI line telephone number and e-mail of couples seeking information about the possibility of adopting children from that country. In general, it is stressed that the cataclysms, as well as emergencies of war, are situations where you need particular caution in starting procedures. In these circumstances it is always necessary to wait, in areas affected by disasters, the situation returns to normal values, in order to restore the conditions to ascertain the true state of abandonment of children living in affected areas (whose families could only be temporarily dispersed) and the procedures for adoption of orphans can be implemented in full compliance national and international. It should be noted that Italy has always had a very limited activities in international adoptions in Haiti and that no process of adoption is now pending in that country.

from: commissioneadozioni.it
automatic translation of original Italian text

Canada fast tracking too

Apparently Canada is following the Dutch example according to the following press release:

Canada to speed up immigration applications from Haiti
(CP)

OTTAWA — The federal government is promising to speed up immigration applications from Haitians with family in Canada.

Immigration Minister Jason Kenney also announced in Ottawa today that Haitians currently in Canada temporarily will also be allowed to extend their stay.

He says applicants must identify themselves as being directly and significantly affected by Tuesday's earthquake.

Kenney also says priority consideration will also be given to pending adoption cases with the visa office in Port-au-Prince.

Report from Haitian Orphanages on damages. 1/18/2010

Carolina Adoption Services: Working with Maison des Anges in Tabarre. CAS reports that they have 90 children, with the majority under the age of 2 years. Thankfully, all of the children are unhurt. The orphanage has sustained some structural damage, but the extent of damage is not yet clear. CAS is concerned about basic supplies of food and water for the children.

Children's House International: Working with Creche Enfante Jesus. CHI reports little damage at the orphanage and no injuries to children. Major damaged to their office/receiving center in Port-au-Prince, but no one was injured. Greatest Need: Food and Water. They are recommending that all donations go through Chances for Children, to help the orphanages most in need.

Tree of Life Adoption Center: Working with HIS Home for Children in Port-au-Prince and Foyer de Sara. TOLA reports that all children are okay and, "The boys' house is damaged, one wall fell down. The children and staff are sleeping outside, afraid that the aftershock will crumble the house. Today they were planning to move the furniture out of that house and find another place to move them. There's about 100 (over) kids in the two location s for HIS Home". They are asking for prayers for their generator that is not in good condition, and that they are able to gather enough food and water to hold them over during this crisis.

Bethany Christian Services: Working with God's Littlest Angels orphanage and The Creche Enfants Jesus. Bethany reports that God's Littlest Angels received no damage or injuires, and little structural damage at The Creche. They also report that both orphanages are willing to take in more children as needed. They ask for prayers. Please designate gifts as "Haiti - Earthquake Fund".
Holt International: Working with Holt Fontana Village. Holt reports that the buildings received little damage, but that the children are in great distress. Holt is asking for financial assistance for the children and will also be offering assistance to the community.
Dillon International: Children are all fine, but disrupted. Many people are moving through the area where the orphanage and hospital are located, which is scaring the children. Some flooding within one building has occured. Greatest need: Gasoline for the generators and ongoing food/water supplies.
ORPHANAGES:

God's Littlest Angels: An orphanage in Haiti. All children fine, but 90 children sleeping outdoors as building damage is assessed. Children are upset and caretakers doing their best to gather supplies to provide for all needs.

Foyer de Sion - This is an orphanage with approximately 225 children in their care in the Port-au-Prince area. They are reporting today that all children are accounted for. One of the three locations was destroyed, but again, all children are safe. They are currently working to bring the children from the destroyed location to one of the other two standing, one in Fontamara and the other in Petionville. The Leogone location was destroyed. We still do not know if they have necessary supplies (food/water) and adequate medical care. Please consider donating to their earthquake fund.

Le Foyer des Filles de Dieu: Home to about 70 girls, located in Port-au-Prince. Confirmed that three girls age 18 have died in the earthquake. These girls were not residents, as reported by many news organizations. One was the daughter of a staff member, and the other two were her friends. The orphanage has sustained damage and the children are in great need of clean water and food. We are unable to find a confirmed donation website for this charity...there appear to be more than one orphanage with this name.

Maison des Enfants de Dieu, in Port-au-Prince: We have received news that on the evening of the 17th, 30 UN soldiers have reached the orphanage with medical care for the babies. The Red Cross has delivered needed aid. This orphanage is actively working to unite the children who are cleared for adoption with their families in the US.

BRESMA: 150 orphans in Port-au-Prince. You may have seen the 2 American sisters on CNN who run this orphanage. Today's report is that 5 orphans have traveled to the US (see news below). The situatio is dire. Although some aid has reached the compound, the haitian community is now camping out near the gates of the orphanage, ready to take any further aid for themselves. Their greatest need is security to guard the children and so that food and clean water may reach them.
NEWS:

Yes by all means lets take

Yes by all means lets take our time. Babies without formula can be patient for a few more days. Are you out of your mind? Get those children out of harms way immediately, get them hydrated, fed and safe. Sure it could cause problems down the road, but problems far less severe than death. Act now!

Haitian children

I want to help, anyway I can, to see the babies out on the street is just horrible. They are living outdoors for godsake, think about if it were your kids. I will take a child or two or three, however many need to come, just get them out of there, don't be so closed minded, people, "stupid death" will run wild in the next few days if we're not careful. Please contact me with any info, thanks.

Outside Port Au Prince

I think we all agree, the street is no place for a child to live and sleep.

30 miles outside of the epicenter is already safe. If I were a parent injured in Port Au Prince, and one (or all of my children) were found stranded on the streets, I'd pray to God someone had the heart and decency to take my children to a local orphanage, so they could be cared for and kept safe. Then I would hope and pray my children were at a place where they can be re-claimed by surviving family members.

I don't know of any orphanages by name or location, but I'm sure groups like The Red Cross or The Salvation Army do. Try contacting them, and ask what sort of supplies and help are needed at local orphanages.... centers designed to keep children cared for and safe.

Take their parents too

If you take the kids, and really want to help them, don't forget to also take their parents, their relatives and their friends with them.

I have lived in extreme horrible poverty as a child, after my mother's death. I was the favourite child of my father; I was very much loved by my siblings and my father, but I was neglected due to poverty. I was homeless for sometime, but I considered my home wherever I was with my father.

I'm sure the adoption agency that made my adoption, without the consent of my father, wanted to get me out of the horrible life of poverty. Adoption certainly took me out from the horrible life of poverty to bring me to a rich home, but  it separated me from my family and their love. Adoption also separated me from my father, my three siblings, my nephew and niece, and also from my brother in law, uncles, aunts, cousins, and many friends.

I was taken out of the poverty, but my father and my two other siblings were left behind in the poverty.

Was it because my life was more important than three other lives? Or was it because some people wanted to take advantage of a situation to fullfill their desire of having a child or making money from it?

I have a big hole in my heart, since I was taken out of the poverty.

I loved my confortable life at the orphanage surrounded by my "orphan" friends, but I have lived with the hole created by the abandonment/separation from my family and also the hope of being reunited with my family.

Since my adoption, I live with thepermanent hole that had been dug deeper by the double-abandonment/separation from a nation, and by the loss of culture and language. No love, no richness, nothing can ever fill such holes.

Don't be closed minded people.
You want to save a child, save the whole family.
Bring the children, but don't separate them from their families.
Don't create holes in their hearts by separating them from their roots.

 

Nicely stated

Don't be closed minded people.
You want to save a child, save the whole family.
Bring the children, but don't separate them from their families.
Don't create holes in their hearts by separating them from their roots.

I agree. The whole families should be airlifted, if this is to happen. Steve King and Rush Limbaugh, the Minutemen and etc can scream all they want about immigration of people from countries they don't approve of all they want, screw them. These things are not mutually-exclusive, helping rebuild, helping relocate, helping return, keeping families together as much as possible.

But a lot of this is academic. People here still can't even contact relatives there. Plus the kids are the wrong color, anyway. I doubt they'll get caught up in the ICA racket.

Kimette: A question.

Kimette, I have read previously on PoundPup some of your story/background. Have you been able to reunite with or find & contact your biological family? I hope so. If not, what have been the obstacles to that - or what would need to change at this time for you to find and contact them?

not closed minded but logical

This knee jerk reaction to airlift orphan children out could be a disaster! we run the risk of seperating families, the children getting into the hands of unethical people, etc. If we can "airlift them out" surely we can "airlift in food, aid, etc.," please why is is easier to airlift them out then to airlift aid in?
This is not the answer, the answer is on the ground help and support with medical, food and finally rebuilding this country.

Japan in the 1940's was reduced to shambles after the USA military dropped the A-Bomb, in 30 short years, Japan rebuilt and became one of the world's economic superpowers. Why hasn't the USA helped to make Haiti economically strong? Feeding, clothing, adopting their children, providing medical care is not enough they are all temporary bandaids.

I am having problem here with this, someone try and straighten out my thoughts.
When Katrina happened the USA did NOTHING to help the people of Louisana, many bigoted people claimed they were a bunch of black welfare parasites anyway. Americans TURNED their back on FELLOW AMERICANS. We are STILL trying to rebuild New Orleans and the surrounding areas.

Yet, something terrible happens in another country that Americans support and America and the International community are there within hours to help out. Why are we so quick to help others when we failed SO miserable with the Katrina victims? Do we have prejudices toward African-Americans vs. Africans of Haitian descent?

Indeed, if we airlift or kidnap the children out---this should include their families or a chaperone for the children so they don't fall into the hands of someone trying to make a buck off of them. Already the scam artists are out and trying to "collect" money.

I agree

If we can "airlift them out" surely we can "airlift in food, aid, etc.,"

I agee with  everything you said Anynymous!
I didn't mean airlifting them out as a better solution. I should have said IF we airlift them out,  them include their families!

Katrina/Haiti/The Blacks

When Katrina happened the USA did NOTHING to help the people of Louisana, many bigoted people claimed they were a bunch of black welfare parasites anyway. Americans TURNED their back on FELLOW AMERICANS. We are STILL trying to rebuild New Orleans and the surrounding areas.

Similar to something I said here earlier re: Haitian kids being airlifted here: too old and the wrong color.

And let us not forget the neighborhood welcome Haitian emigre's got when they came to these shores in the 80s due to political reasons.

As for Katrina, the only people who did anything about it were the longstanding Black denominations, who already had those kinds of networks in place for the displaced literally going back to slavery in some cases. None of that made the news.

I've no doubt many are kicking in to help Haitians now, because we know all too well what kind of treatment they're in for once they get here, since we've been dealing with it here since the 17th century.

Public Image

I am having problem here with this, someone try and straighten out my thoughts.
When Katrina happened the USA did NOTHING to help the people of Louisana, many bigoted people claimed they were a bunch of black welfare parasites anyway. Americans TURNED their back on FELLOW AMERICANS. We are STILL trying to rebuild New Orleans and the surrounding areas.

Yet, something terrible happens in another country that Americans support and America and the International community are there within hours to help out.

Lots of people will turn their back on those suffering in their own back-yard, but will travel across lands and seas, to another country, just to look good.  I never understood international adoption... other than it seems to fulfill some deranged need for public praise and approval.

 

 

The sympathy shown is great.

The sympathy shown is great. It's just to bad kids in our own loacal areas couldn't get this attention. They sleep out side. In like minus 40 sometimes. oh those poor kids having to sleep outside in the tropical air... god have mercy on them.

Are you people for real?

Fake fake fake fake......

  I guess it will take an earthquake to happen before people care? Dunno. My sympathies to those children cought in the disaster. But for the rest of them.... selling their children off like a commodity... I am nto even gonna say because I don't have to. Unfortunately the adoption industry will see this as an opportunity and use it as one. How sad... If Karma don't learn ya the first time. Perhaps the second time will be the charm.

Maybe or is it the third

Or maybe is it's the third time that is a charm.... I can never remember that expression....

....

Earth quake happens and people start scooping out the kids by the bucket load?
I think not.
I think people might wanna wait till things get sorted and unite families . Before people start deciding who get what children... I'm just saying...

Ohh but nooo...

It's the Haitians who are doing all the "looting"...

My mother was part of the

My mother was part of the Pedro Pan exodus out of Cuba. That being said, I believe there are many Haitian children that are in need of a home, food, shelter and love right now. As in the Cuban exodus, some children were never reunited with their parents. However, their parents made the decision to give their children political freedom. Obviously, this is a completely different case but the outcome will be the same. Should these children just be "separated" from their parents and not orphaned, they should be able to return to their families once the dust has settled but in the meantime should be entitled to the comforts of living in a warm home rather than being neglected, living in a tent with thousands of other children. I do worry about where they'd be relocate to and if anyone will claim these children or provide foster housing for them. However, at this point I think bringing them here would be better than the alternative.

Clearly, this is solely my opinion but I know I am willing to do my part and assist in any efforts, should the situation call for it, as should we all.

Temporary, not permanant, care

Throughout the history of child placement, political corruption has been the root cause behind the removal of children from dissidents; and social unrest has been the excuse used by religious groups involved in "operation baby-lift".  Vietnam is a prime forced exodus example.

Areas like Haiti do need outsiders willing to provide temporary care and assistance for its people, especially the children. Obviously, they have neither the tools nor the means to do the work themselves. I would even agree that removing children from a volatile situation is the smartest and safest thing to do in the name of child-safety. But this removal and care offered by members outside of Haiti should be temporary.  It's too easy for weak and corrupt governments to take advantage of "relief efforts", and I strongly oppose the permanent removal of a child, just so people on a religious or political mission can promote international adoption within their growing groups.

I would like to see the days of using  fast-track international adoption as a "humanitarian effort" come to an end. Humanitarian efforts should be focused on one plan, and that plan should be simple: help overwhelmed locals back on their feet, so they can function on their own without outside help. Aid-groups should not be peddling small children to those promoting international adoption. Aid groups should be helping living victims re-build their devastated region so survivors not only recover, but do so in such a way that they discover, with pride, they are not only capable of rising above ruin, but they are also capable of providing a better quality of life for themselves, and their children.

As if Haitian-Americans don't have enough problems already...

The reverse is being proposed, too.. class act Steve King is using this awful situation to peddle anti-illegal-immigrant politics, if not just loud blather.

http://blogs.desmoinesregister.com/dmr/index.php/2010/01/15/steve-king-s...

I'm sure he'll be just thrilled with the idea of an airlift of kids TO the US.

Organizers say too soon to implement 'Operation Pierre Pan' for

from: sun-sentinel.com

Rescue, recovery and relief are priorities after Haitian earthquake

By Rafael A. Olmeda and Alexia Campbell, Sun Sentinel
January 15, 2010

Randolph McGrorty admits it's a little too soon to focus on what some are calling "Operation Pierre Pan," but the concept has already captured the imagination of advocacy groups and others looking to offer hope to the orphans of the Haitian earthquake.

"The response has been swift and overwhelming," said McGrorty, executive director of Catholic Charities Legal Services in Miami. McGrorty floated the idea in news conferences Thursday. By Friday morning, he had to remind supporters that the immediate need in Haiti has to take precedence over the concept, which is modeled after the "Operation Pedro Pan" movement that brought thousands of Cuban children to the United States in the 1960s.

McGrorty acknowledged are big differences between post-revolution Cuba and post-earthquake Haiti, including the motivation behind the migration and the potential to ultimately reunite the children with their families. But the overall objective is the same: a fighting chance at a life with opportunity.

"It's not something that, in the rescue and recovery stage of operations in Haiti, everyone should be focused on at the moment," McGrorty said. "And before we can implement it, we first need to assess the need and, second, assess our resources, our ability to meet that need."

That, he said, will take some time, not to mention the permission of the United States government. McGrorty said he has contacted the Department of Homeland Security about the idea, but no commitments have been made at this early stage.

"At this point, we are focused on reuniting children with surviving family members and will have information in the coming days about children who may need additional assistance," said Homeland Security spokesman Matthew Chandler. "We thank the American people for their generous support during this difficult time."

That hasn't stopped others from endorsing or preparing for the arrival of hundreds or possibly thousands of Haitian children.

"We've already begun to make preparations and are willing to do our part," said Mark Riordan, Broward County spokesman for the state's Department of Children and Families. While he didn't know how many children could end up calling Broward County home, Riordan said he does not every child in the program to end up in South Florida.

He also doesn't expect them all to be orphans. "It would not surprise me if parents who wanted a better life for their children gave them up and said 'Here, take care of my child,'" he said.

Aside from the logistical issues of how many children would be brought into the United States and where they will be sheltered, there are legal issues revolving around their immigration status that need to be resolved with the federal government.

Those who favor a stricter U.S. immigration policy have in the past vehemently opposed giving temporary protected status to other groups because they argued it is a backdoor to granting amnesty. The status given to Salvadorans, Nicaraguans and Hondurans following Mitch was repeatedly extended for more than a decade, presumably long after those countries were able to rebuild. About 350,000 Central Americans have the designation as do about 950 Somalis and Sudanese in the U.S. since 2001 and 2004.

"TPS was invented for this kind of situation, but it has been turned into something much more permanent" said Mark Krikorian, of the Center for Immigration Studies. "And while we probably should grant TPS to Haitians who were here before the earthquake, we really need to make sure it's temporary."

Krikorian said he hopes if it's granted to the Haitians, the U.S. government will use the opportunity to revamp the policy.

"Congress and or the administration should be forced after a few months to either fish or cut bait — to either resume deportation or grant green cards," he said. "Either they need to home go home and start their lives over or do it here. We're keeping them limbo."

But McGrorty said he expects sympathy in the aftermath of the earthquake to trump any backlash born of longstanding political positions on immigration policy.

"I suspect if there's a backlash, it will be dwarfed by the enormity of the need and the generosity and compassion of the American people," he said.

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.

just lke someone asked, what

just lke someone asked, what did india do to deserve lindsay lohan, what did haitian children do to deserve american dfs? if the earthquake didnt kill them, american foster care will.

Haiti Orphans/American Foster Homes

OUCH! While I would definately agree with you that there are those very unhealthy and dysfunctional foster homes out there that are of more harm than good, may I also remind you that there are homes that truly care for the well being of the children and do sacrifice themselves for the betterment of the children in thier care! Just as in any profession you find people with good character and those who are mentally warped! (Doctors, Priests, Teachers, etc... Pedifile and sickminded people are in all professions, not just fostering homes.) If a family has been screened and is under the supervision of a GOOD Dept. of Child Services there shouldn't be those homes that I wouldn't even allow my dog to stay in overnight! Accountability and integrity are a must in working with children through any profession.
Not all DCS agencies are inadequate in recruting and licensing qualified loving foster/adoptive homes who truly protect children. And "Yes" I would love to assist the children of Haiti by fostering several of their orphans until the country can get re-established and healthy again. I have been doing the same for American children for the last 24 years and consider it a priveldge to help children in crisis.
Don't throw out all the good with the bad that is in our world. :)

Well Stated!

Thank you for this posting and for your efforts to improve the lives of needy children! Why let all foster or adoptable children suffer out of fear that a very small percentage may be abused in some way? Let there be greater scrutiny and oversight of foster care providers and AP's, but don't look down on these people who give of themselves generously to insure the health and happiness of children not born of their flesh!

loving home for Haitian orphan

My husband of 14 years and I have three biological children and have been on the waiting list to adopt a special needs child internationally for over three years. We have been approved by the country we are seeking to adopt from and have completed all necessary documentation as well as the homestudy required by U.S. Customs and Immigration Service. We are fully screened and are legally able to bring an adopted child into our family, and into this country.

We would gladly open our home and our hearts to care for an orphan(s) temporarily. It is my belief that psychologically the children would benefit from a "vacation" from their current lives. If those of us in our situation, of which there are many, could step up and lovingly "host" orphaned, needy children from Haiti, I believe we would be helping to minimize scars these children will suffer. I would not be "buying" a child. I would be a foster parent without asking for any sort of payment or reimbursement from the government. We would not be attempting to fulfill dreams of becoming parents, we already are. Our offer to help raise needy children comes from a genuine desire to help make a difference in this world. It would be a fantastic honor to be able to reunite the child(ren) with the parents or other relatives as soon as they wanted and could care for them.

Could we or should we bring entire families here? I don't know the right answer to that. All I know is that we are in a legal position that, with some government flexibility, could care for a child. Should we send monetary resources to Haiti? Absolutely! And we are. There is no perfect solution to the horrific situation the Haitian people are enduring. I only know that if we were allowed, we would make a difference in a child's life, and hopefully difference in the lives of the parents as well.

Please comment if you have any other ideas or suggestions.

Let professionals do their work

I think most children in Haiti that have been hit by this earthquake will want to know where their family is and how they are doing. At this point it's impossible to know which children are really orphans, and which children are not. Removing children now seems a bad idea and only increase stress.

The best that can be done now is rescue people and provide immediate relief and emergency shelter. I don't think the children in Haiti need a vacation, they need to be taken care of and the whereabouts of their families needs to be established. All that can better be done, and for a lot less money, than flying a handfull of children to the U.S. or Europe.

Imagine the stress a child has being in America and not knowing whether family members are still alive or not. Imagine learning familiy members are still alive and not being able to see them immediately. Imagine learning family members are no longer alive and having to mourn among strangers in a strange land.

On top of that, it is a dangerous undertaking to remove children now, many don't have the appropriate paperwork, and not all all host-families are entirely trustworthy either. What if host-families don't want to return a child, what if a child gets administratively lost?

As much as there are lots of well-intended people out there, wanting to do something for the children in Haiti, there are also those that want to take advantage of the children. The tsunami of 2005 showed situations like these are a magnet for pedophiles. So let's keep things as simple as possible. Let relief organizations, that have knowledge how to deal with situations like these do their work.

Of course it is a good idea to financially support organizations like Save the Children, Unicef, The Red Cross etc. with donations, but other than that let professionals deal with the situation. Many well intended but rushed initiatives in past have shown to back fire seriously.

You're right

I agree with most of what you are saying. Never should anything be rushed. I'm not saying this should happen now or even a month from now. There are too many immediate needs than to focus on relocating children. Additionally, any proposed system of relocating "orphans" carries with it a risk of certain failures. As an educated social work professional, currently a stay-at-home mom, I shudder at the thought of placing innocent children in the hands of ill-intentioned foreigners.

Could my family lovingly assist in healing physical as well as emotional wounds? Absolutely. Are there other qualified families willing to help? I'm sure there are.

A system of fostering orphaned children will never be perfect. All I know is that if the tables were turned, I would give my right arm for a loving family elsewhere in the world to care for my children while I'm living in an unstable land with an uncertain future. Having time to recouperate and plan for the future of my family while my kids are safely cared for would indeed be a blessing. A perfect situation? Never. But, nevertheless a blessing.

APAs to the rescue. Again.

Could my family lovingly assist in healing physical as well as emotional wounds?

Meh...

Haitian Orphan Airlift

I see the potential airlift as a way to save the lives of children in a desperate situation. We have a limited logistical capacity to put troops and supplies on the ground in Haiti, and we will only be able to help a fraction of their survivors. The country's already inadequate infrastructure was devastated by the earthquake, so many adults and children will likely die from lack of clean water and food. We save more of their children from death if the planes carrying supplies to Haiti return with children instead of coming back empty. In this particular case, I believe that the survival of children trumps concerns about potential abuses. The orphaned children left in Haiti have the least chance of survival, as they do not have family to fight to get them water and food.
Once the situation is stabilized, I would hope that most of the children brought here could be sent back to Haiti once family members are found who are willing to care for them. For those unable to find a home in Haiti, I think that families screened though the rigorous international adoption process should be able to adopt them, assuming that the reconstituted Haitian government agrees. Haiti would also have the option to bring them back to orphanages in their country, once they are rebuilt, assuming there is enough space.

You must be kidding

How many children had you in mind to airlift?

There are literally tens of thousands of children in or near Port-au-Prince who may or may not have lost their parents during the earth quake. In any case, the number of children in need of protection far exceeds the number of approved families in America willing and able to take in these children.

When you randomly start airlifting children from Haiti to the U.S., you end up with a situation where these children are either put in camps, or they will be placed with people that have not been screened. Doing so creates every pedophiles wet dream, access to a barely documented child with little or no judicial oversight.

Other's may see it as a chance to have a child they couldn't receive themselves, and fight the system tooth and nail not to return the child, even when family members are alive and wanting their child back.

On a more practical note, how would you transport children on a cargo plane?

Simon, Yes, it would

Simon,

Yes, it would probably be cargo planes. My Dad flew c-130 and c-141 during Vietnam and brought many orphans to America after the horrible deaths of their families. Why don't we just take a breath and a minute and get those poor children away from that very dangerous area. I don't think you would pull a child out of a burning building and dump them in the front yard to fend for themselves. Let's get them to a safe and sanitary place where they can heal and EAT! We can then take pictures and document them so we can return them to their parents and their home. Those that don't have parents can then be put into proper foster homes then adopted. I would think if many of them could talk, they would say it was more important for them to eat and have good medical care, than be on their "home turf."

Help for Haitians

First of all, my husband said much of what you're saying! None of this is perfect, but protecting these children in the short term should be our utmost concern (or there WON'T BE A LONG TERM TO CONSIDER). Earlier someone made a comment insinuating that we'd be herding these kids and treating them like cargo, throwing them on a cargo plane. First of all, my husband is a senior military officer and we PREFER to travel on military cargo planes. Once in the air, our children are rarely in their seats, but rather spread out on blankets playing games or treated to cockpit tours. If cargo planes are our preferred mode of air transport, they are good enough for others.

Here is an excerpt from a blog written by a current Haitian orphanage volunteer, who is a friend of a friend. This was written on Sunday.....

"We've heard from Annette a couple times today. She was feeling pretty sick this morning, but she's hoping it's still just food related and nothing more serious. All the babies at the orphanage always have stomach and digestive issues from parasites, but a few of them are even more sick than usual, so we are praying she doesn't get anything serious. One of the other volunteers (who has spent substantial time in Haiti before) is so sick right now that she can't get out of bed.

The orphanage also found out today that all its Haitian nannies survived the earthquake. There were many who were not on duty when the earthquake happened, and who had not come back to work since then, so the staff at the orphanage wasn't sure if some of them had died or if they were just busy caring for their families. Not all of the nannies have returned to work yet, but since they are all alive, it is likely that they will be able to come back to work soon, which is good news for the extremely exhausted volunteers.

Some more good news...twenty of the orphans from GLA are leaving on Tuesday to their adoptive families in Finland. This is a huge praise, as it means these children will be safely home, and that the strain on the volunteers and food supply at GLA will be lessened.

Some more good news...the 737 from CO Springs is still scheduled to leave here tomorrow and arrive in Haiti on Tuesday. I know the orphanage is eagerly awaiting the supplies and additional volunteers and medical staff who are coming. Pray for safe travels, and that they will be able to get the supplies through the city and to the orphanage without being mobbed.

The only thing Annette is concerned about with all the new volunteers coming is the supply situation. She doesn't know how much supplies they are actually bringing, but having 10-15 more adults to feed is a concern. She said that after Tuesday, when they have so many more volunteers and 20 fewer children, she will see if she is still needed or if she is just one more mouth to feed. After that, she will be able to consider more seriously how long she should stay.

The situation with getting out of Haiti is difficult right now. The 737 that is arriving on Tuesday will be taking American evacuees when it returns to the States. However, (from what she had been told) in order to get on a rescue flight, you have to be on the waiting list at the embassy, and after you sign up on the list, you have to stay at the embassy to keep your place. So for now, since the new volunteers haven't arrived yet, she isn't able to leave and get on the list.

Pray for her to have wisdom in the coming days to asses the situation and know the best thing to do. Also pray that, if she is in fact no longer needed, that a commercial flight will be available so she won't have to go wait in the city.

Please continue to pray for the supply situation, as it will still be at least 48 hours before the supplies from the relief flight arrive. The orphanage is only running the electrical generators for four hours a day now, and they still are not able to bathe, clean, or use water for anything other than drinking. Pray that they will get a local, reliable supply of water and fuel soon. Continue to pray also that Annette will remain healthy."

To me, this says it all. They are managing the best they can, but the children are sick. The supplies are limited and may not even be re-stocked if the cargo is ambushed in route to the orphanages. Can we save every child? No. But, the more we CAN save, the better.

Let the Haitian government decide. They are good people and I'm sure they'd agree.

Would we or should we keep the children here once the crisis has passed? I agree with you. Every effort should be made to reunite children with their birth families. In the likely event that some are left without any family members, they should be allowed to be adopted. Is this a perfect answer? No, but it will save the most children.

Not all the Vietnam Operation Baby Lift were "Orphans"

To Mrylands: As the USA did in Vietnam, since we caused the situations of many orphans when we invaded Iraq and Afghanistan, is it acceptable to us to "Air lift" the orphan babies of these two countries?

The Life We Were Given

Operation Babylift, International Adoption, and the Children of War in Vietnam

By Dana Sachs
(Beacon Press, Hardcover, 9780807042410, 288pp.)

Publication Date: April 2010

Categories: International Relations - General, United States - 20th Century, Asia - Southeast Asia


Description

In April 1975, just before the fall of Saigon, the U.S. government launched "Operation Babylift," a highly publicized plan to evacuate nearly three thousand displaced Vietnamese children and place them with adoptive families overseas. Chaotic from start to finish, the mission gripped the world—with a traumatic plane crash, international media snapping pictures of bewildered children traveling to their new homes, and families clamoring to adopt the waifs.

Often presented as a great humanitarian effort, Operation Babylift provided an opportunity for national catharsis following the trauma of the American experience in Vietnam. Now, thirty-five years after the war ended, Dana Sachs examines this unprecedented event more carefully, revealing how a single public-policy gesture irrevocably altered thousands of lives, not always for the better. Though most of the children were orphans, many were not, and the rescue offered no possibility for families to later reunite.

With sensitivity and balance, Sachs deepens her account by including multiple perspectives: birth mothers making the wrenching decision to relinquish their children; orphanage workers, military personnel, and doctors trying to "save" them; politicians and judges attempting to untangle the controversies; adoptive families waiting anxiously for their new sons and daughters; and the children themselves, struggling to understand. In particular, the book follows one such child, Anh Hansen, who left Vietnam through Operation Babylift and, decades later, returned to reunite with her birth mother. Through Anh’s story, and those of many others, The Life We Were Given will inspire impassioned discussion and spur dialogue on the human cost of war, international adoption and aid efforts, and U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

About the Author

Dana Sachs has written about Vietnam for twenty years. The author of The House on Dream Street: Memoir of an American Woman in Vietnam and the novel If You Lived Here, and coauthor of Two Cakes Fit for a King: Folktales from Vietnam, she teaches at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington and lives in North Carolina.

Latest update from RainbowKIDS, this a.m. from Haiti.

Helping Haiti 's Most Vulnerable
Orphans in Crisis
Martha Osborne

In the midst of this crisis, many readers of RainbowKids have called and emailed, wondering what can be done for Haiti 's orphans. While it is not possible to adopt Haitian children who have been separated from their families (due to their undetermined orphan status), there is still much that may be done to ease the suffering of these children.

While the need to take in additional children is being considered by the orphanage staffs, it must also be noted that the caretakers of the orphanages are primarily Haitian women who have their own families to care for during this time of tragedy. Fortunately, we are hearing reports of local families coming forward in the lessh damaged areas to offer temporary care for the children of the orphanages. Though poor economically, it should be noted that the people of Haiti are a warm and loving people who recognize the needs of their community. They are reaching out to one another, offering their homes and care whenever possible.

Currently, the greatest challenge is getting the much needed supplies in and around the country. Most of these orphanages are small, housing from 12 to under 100 children.

If you would like to donate, please contact one of the following organizations or orphanages working with children in the orphanages of Haiti:

ORGANIZATIONS:

Carolina Adoption Services: Working with Maison des Anges in Tabarre. CAS reports that they have 90 children, with the majority under the age of 2 years. Thankfully, all of the children are unhurt. The orphanage has sustained some structural damage, but the extent of damage is not yet clear. CAS is concerned about basic supplies of food and water for the children.
Children's House International: Working with Creche Enfante Jesus. CHI reports little damage at the orphanage and no injuries to children. Major damaged to their office/receiving center in Port-au-Prince, but no one was injured. Greatest Need: Food and Water. They are recommending that all donations go through Chances for Children, to help the orphanages most in need.
Tree of Life Adoption Center: Working with HIS Home for Children in Port-au-Prince and Foyer de Sara. TOLA reports that all children are okay and, "The boys' house is damaged, one wall fell down. The children and staff are sleeping outside, afraid that the aftershock will crumble the house. Today they were planning to move the furniture out of that house and find another place to move them. There's about 100 (over) kids in the two location s for HIS Home". They are asking for prayers for their generator that is not in good condition, and that they are able to gather enough food and water to hold them over during this crisis.
Bethany Christian Services: Working with God's Littlest Angels orphanage and The Creche Enfants Jesus. Bethany reports that God's Littlest Angels received no damage or injuires, and little structural damage at The Creche. They also report that both orphanages are willing to take in more children as needed. They ask for prayers. Please designate gifts as "Haiti - Earthquake Fund".
Holt International: Working with Holt Fontana Village. Holt reports that the buildings received little damage, but that the children are in great distress. Holt is asking for financial assistance for the children and will also be offering assistance to the community.
Dillon International: Children are all fine, but disrupted. Many people are moving through the area where the orphanage and hospital are located, which is scaring the children. Some flooding within one building has occured. Greatest need: Gasoline for the generators and ongoing food/water supplies.
ORPHANAGES:

God's Littlest Angels: An orphanage in Haiti. All children fine, but 90 children sleeping outdoors as building damage is assessed. Children are upset and caretakers doing their best to gather supplies to provide for all needs.
Foyer de Sion - This is an orphanage with approximately 225 children in their care in the Port-au-Prince area. They are reporting today that all children are accounted for. One of the three locations was destroyed, but again, all children are safe. They are currently working to bring the children from the destroyed location to one of the other two standing, one in Fontamara and the other in Petionville. The Leogone location was destroyed. We still do not know if they have necessary supplies (food/water) and adequate medical care. Please consider donating to their earthquake fund.
Le Foyer des Filles de Dieu: Home to about 70 girls, located in Port-au-Prince. Confirmed that three girls age 18 have died in the earthquake. These girls were not residents, as reported by many news organizations. One was the daughter of a staff member, and the other two were her friends. The orphanage has sustained damage and the children are in great need of clean water and food. We are unable to find a confirmed donation website for this charity...there appear to be more than one orphanage with this name.
Maison des Enfants de Dieu, in Port-au-Prince: We have received news that on the evening of the 17th, 30 UN soldiers have reached the orphanage with medical care for the babies. The Red Cross has delivered needed aid. This orphanage is actively working to unite the children who are cleared for adoption with their families in the US.
BRESMA: 150 orphans in Port-au-Prince. You may have seen the 2 American sisters on CNN who run this orphanage. Today's report is that 5 orphans have traveled to the US (see news below). The situatio is dire. Although some aid has reached the compound, the haitian community is now camping out near the gates of the orphanage, ready to take any further aid for themselves. Their greatest need is security to guard the children and so that food and clean water may reach them.
NEWS:

1/18/10, 9AM Central: Many orphange directors are reporting in that they are desperately trying to cobble together the full paperwork on each child in their care. Many children were in the process of being adopted (to US families and families in other countries). With the possibility of US Visas being issued to these children, it has become a priority to gather this documentation. Unfortunately, much paperwork has been lost due to orphanage/office collapse, and due to the justice building in Haiti collapsing. Shannon Hoffman of Angel House Orphanage emailed this update: "23 of our 26 orphans were in the process of being adopted at the time of the earthquake. Some already legally have their American last names, and are in the last few steps of the process. The Department of Homeland Security and the State Department have to change rules or make special exceptions for these kids to get them into the country. Most if not all of the adoption files have been lost in the earthquake. Many of the adoption case workers and attorneys have either been killed or severely injured."
1/17/10 We have news that the USCIS and DOS, who are offering expedited visas to children whose adoptons are complete, have brought in the first group of 5 children. Children are from the BRESMA orphanage. We await further confirmation of these children's arrival. It should be noted that the BRESMA orphanage places children with adoptive families in the USA and in Holland and France. We have no news on the children with families in Holland and France.

http://www.rainbowkids.com/ArticleDetails.aspx?id=688

The first laugh I had in DAYS!

 I think that families screened though the rigorous international adoption process should be able to adopt them.

"Rigorous"? 

Maybe for some, the adoption screening process is "rigorous".  For many others, getting a child is like walking in the park and taking the cutest one home.

orphans...

I hear your side, but what about the 600+ orphans already in the process of being adopted by American families... why make them sit back and watch their children starve or die of disease when the government could bring them home earlier??? When families are already attached and have been approved but are simply waiting on paperwork, this seems ridiculous. Lets try and bring these kids home!

Another scenario

Please don't forget these children are Haitian citizens, and a judge on Haiti has to decide about the adoption of these children, not Americans. Besides that, most of the children that are in the process of being adopted, don't live in or near Port-au-Prince; there are orphanages all over the country.

Let's look at a hypothetical situation and assume San Francisco were hit by an earthquake, causing massive damage. Each year Canada, the United Kingdom the Netherlands and Germany adopt nearlly as many children from America, as Americans adopt children from Haiti. In both cases we're talking about approximately 300 children per year.

Foreign prospective adopters, hoping to receive an American child, are likely to be equally attached and approved as Americans are with respect to Haitian children, and the only reason they haven't yet received the child, is because they are simply waiting for paperwork.

Under the assumption San Fransisco were hit by an earthquake, would it be okay if all foreign adoptions of American children were fast-tracked too? Would it be okay in such a situation, to simply airlift children from Los Angeles, Kansas City, Atlanta and Philadelphia to Canada and Europe without intervention of an American judge?

Oh Cripes, don't give ppl that idea

That's all SF needs, is a bunch of adoption-drunk PAPs ready to "save the children" from us queers, particuarly the ones raising children, adopted or bio.

Please, no more SF earthquake refs!

Orphans, 600

I suspect this number is terrible INFLATED, look at the Haitian numbers of exports, there isn't even that many for the last 2 years.
I also heard 900 from another publication. Which was the JCICS statement (surprise-surprise)

This morning e mail from one Haitian Orphanage offical put it at 23 to American families. But only about half that amount were near completed or completed with Haitian paperwork.
Remember these children do not belong to anyone until they have passed their exit interview at the US Embassy.

Think before adopting internationally!

Why are you looking to adopt an international special needs child. Don't you think that there are enough special needs children in the United States that need a home?

I also work in social welfare and have 5 adopted children, all of whom are of races different than my wife and I, 2 of which have speical needs. We didn't have to go far to adopt them (2 from Chicago, 2 from Iowa, and 1 from Utah). We chose to adopt because of the overwhelming need for child rearing in our country.

As an individual working in social welfare I am sure that you are aware of the incredible cost a child/adult in the welfare system is on society. In our state an adult with moderate special needs can spend up to $919,800.00 on themselves for assistance throughout the year. That is a horrendous and ridiculous amount of money to spend on 1 person. Bringing more children with special needs into our country isn't a cost effective approach to solving the problem. The minute that child steps foot on US soil he/she will be automatically entitled to SSI and Medicaid (unless you are in the State of Texas) for the rest of their life.

That said I, I do support taking care of those with special needs, even if they are in another country; however, I believe that we should do our part in sending help to them in their respective countries (even bring them to the US for special procedures, but send them back home). The cost it is to our taxpayers is entirely unfair when a child with special needs are brought into this country (unless of course you are willing to foot the childs living expenses and medical care for the length of their life).

International adoption

I hear what you're saying. Maybe I should have elaborated a bit more. We are seeking a child with minor, correctable special needs. We are not purposely bringing a child into this country that the government will have to support in any way, shape or form. Initially we were on the non-special needs list, but have in the last year decided our hearts were more into helping a child with special needs that could be corrected with medical care in this country.

Why have we chosen to adopt internationally? Frankly, because we didn't want the option of birth parents deciding at a later date to take away our child, or to deal with that drama. The situation is different when fostering Haitian children, they would not be ours from the beginning. Additionally, it is more difficult to adopt a toddler or baby here in this country and not as easy to find a single child not part of a sibling group. I feel certain that a birthmother somewhere in the U.S. would choose us to adopt her newborn. We don't feel a calling to adopt a newborn that so many childless couples are competing with us to adopt when we have already had three of our own. In my opinion, right or wrong, adopting newborns is more for creating families and less helpful to mankind. When our children are older I would love to adopt American teenagers and give them a forever family. It is important to us that we bring children into our family in the natural birth order and our youngest just turned 4.

Because we are one of the few caucasian families ready and willing to adopt a fully African American child in our area, a local adoption agency has contacted us twice in the past couple months offering us babies/toddlers. We jumped at the opportunities and decided that we would pull our international dossier and adopt domestically if it worked out. In the end, both sets of birth parents ultimately changed their minds on adoption. Are we still open to this, absolutely! In the mean time, we still sit and wait internationally.

I applaud you for your making a difference in the lives of so many children!

If California or any other state was in a situation similar to Haiti, I would expect that a plan to offer orphans for adoption would be well thought out and properly implemented. Would I be upset if Europeans adopted children that Americans wouldn't or couldn't step up to care for? No, not at all. I would consider it a blessing for orphaned, fully adoptable children to have loving families, regardless of nationality or geographic location.

Not your child

Why have we chosen to adopt internationally? Frankly, because we didn't want the option of birth parents deciding at a later date to take away our child, or to deal with that drama.

It's not your child.

Because we are one of the few caucasian families ready and willing to adopt a fully African American child in our area, a local adoption agency has contacted us twice in the past couple months offering us babies/toddlers.

I certainly hope you're setting aside 2 savings accounts for them, then: one for college and one for their therapy bills. They'll need both.

Watch for Adoption Scams

The worse the economy the more these scums come out of the woodwork, preying on childless parents longing for a baby. 

Beware of kenygodlove@yahoo.com, adoption scammer in Cameroon

in From PlainJaneMom.com

Some spam I get is hilarious and well worth the irritation. For example:

Try Penis Enlarge Patch once and be happy for the rest of your life.

“Once” ? Really? That is one hell of a patch.

But other spam I get is much more subtle and sad. For example:

Hi there Erika.

I m contacting on your interest in adopting a baby from Africa.so for more information get back to me as soon as you can

I almost deleted it, but instead I decided to see how far I could get him to go and how much of his scam I could get him to reveal. I responded:

Sounds interesting — tell me more.

Very quickly I got 2 messages from him:

Thanks for the mail. I will get back to you soon.

Followed by:

Thank you very much for your response. My name is Michelle and I am a Birth Mother and Adoption Professional working at catholic mission. I would like to talk with you briefly to make sure leslie and blandin fulfills what you are looking for. When you get a few moments,please in making things progress more smoothly. Also, we will need to send you a packet of information to fill out so that you can begin working with an Adoption Specialist.

GENERAL INFORMATIONS

NAME…………….

CELL PHONE………

E-MAIL…………..

BIRTH DATE…….

AGE……………..

BIRTH PLACE…………

SOCIAL SUCURITY………

RACE……………………..

RELIGION……………..

NIT ORIGIN……………

CITIZEN SHIP………..

MARRIAGE DATE………..

SIZE …………………

ADDRESS 1…………

ADDRESS 2………..

COLOR………………….

WE NEED A BRIEF REASON OF ADOPTING A CHILD AND HOW WILL YOU TAKE CARE OF HER/HIM.WE ARE LOCATED IN CAMEROON FROM WHERE THE BABIES ARE COMING FROM.AFTER YOU HAVE FILL THE FORM,I WILL SEND TO YOU SOME PICTURES OF THE AVIALEBE CHILDREN FOR YOU TO MAKE YOUR CHOICE,SO GET BACK TO US FOR MARE INFORMATIONS.

Sincerely,

See the first part of the scam yet? “SOCIAL SUCURITY” — they’re no dummies. They even mis-spell it so you might think “Oh hell, they just have to be for real.” I mean yeah, it is funny that they added “SIZE” and “COLOR” as questions, but overall this is awful. So I wrote back:

I’d love to see the pictures, thanks.

And this is what arrived:

Hi there Erika,Thanks for mailing back,

Attach are some of the pictures of the babies,so you will have to mack your choice,and get back to us,and please we will need the information that were send to you.hope you will love the pics get back to us as soon as you can.

Thanks

11.jpg

21.jpg

31.jpg

I was so floored by the photos (I whited-out the eyes) that I guess I didn’t respond quickly enough. I got another note from him:

Hi there,i m still waiting to read from you.

get back to me as soon as you can.

thanks

So I said:

Hi Keny,

I’m curious about how much this will cost — I don’t know if I can afford to do it. Also, what are the rules about adopting from Cameroon? Is there any official paperwork to take care of? And how soon could I bring a child home?

Erika

To which he replied:

Good Day

In this adoption , we real do not give a specific price, we just need a home for the shelter for our kids and any one who will care for them while they grow as their children. but you have to make a choice of what you have and you consider that from the age he/she is now what expenses we have involved in and you compensate us. so i will like to ask. what do you have to offer in having baby please do not be afraid to say it just make a proposal and we will see what we can do. we don’t sell children as one cannot sell Gods creature for it is above our carriage. so we need just a compensation from you considering the cater of the child.if you are ready baby now,it will take about 3weeks for you to have the baby at your home okay.so get back to us with what you have for the baby,so that we can stat the paperwork asap.

Thanks and waiting to read from you

The next day he said:

Hi there Erika,

I m still waiting to read from you.

Thanks and stay bless

And at the point I lost all credibility as an investigator because I just couldn’t stomach corresponding with him anymore. Especially because I know the next steps. I would offer some money, it would miraculously be enough. But when the time got closer and closer there would be paperwork fees, travel fees, and so on. And what do you know, the child would never appear.

At least that’s how it works with the classic “Free Puppy from Cameroon” scam that he and many others are also working.

Christ, does he think no one will google his email address? The sad part is that that is all I had to do to discover exactly how he was going to try to scam me, but inevitably he’ll find someone who doesn’t do that and will get their money.

I had intended to get deeper into this, but it turns out that I just don’t have the fortitude for it. It made me physically ill every time I dealt with him. What a depressing situation.

Satisfying the needs

A few statements that made me laugh in disgust.

I would like to talk with you briefly to make sure leslie and blandin fulfills what you are looking for.

and

Attach are some of the pictures of the babies,so you will have to mack your choice,and get back to us,and please we will need the information that were send to you.hope you will love the pics get back to us as soon as you can.

Followed-up with:

In this adoption , we real do not give a specific price, we just need a home for the shelter for our kids and any one who will care for them while they grow as their children. but you have to make a choice of what you have and you consider that from the age he/she is now what expenses we have involved in and you compensate us. so i will like to ask. what do you have to offer in having baby please do not be afraid to say it just make a proposal and we will see what we can do. we don’t sell children as one cannot sell Gods creature for it is above our carriage. so we need just a compensation from you considering the cater of the child.if you are ready baby now,it will take about 3weeks for you to have the baby at your home okay.so get back to us with what you have for the baby,so that we can stat the paperwork asap.

Here's the sad pathetic part..... people looking to adopt an infant fall for this all the time.  [How many people have been scammed, then stunned, to learn the money paid to cover administrative fees is not going to be returned?]

What makes this all the more disturbing and tragic is how this set-up can and does really work for the person "not selling" babies to eager PAP's.  Think about it... while some people don't really do much than offer a bogus plan on the internet, there are those who take an adoption-plan, and turn it into something else.   See Child Trafficking cases to see how dark "promise-making" can really get.

As long as there are those who immediately fall in-love and attach to a baby's photo, there will be profiting scammers doing more than taking money from unsuspecting people.

One AP to Another

Why have we chosen to adopt internationally? Frankly, because we didn't want the option of birth parents deciding at a later date to take away our child, or to deal with that drama.

One of the worst reasons to adopt internationally is to put as much distance between biological mother and child.  You're going to have to deal with "that drama" sooner or later.  Perhaps both.

Whether it's sooner (a legal custody battle over an infant) or later (an older child eventually searching for their family), you should not only deal with that drama...    you should embrace it.

The director of our agency had 12 children, nine of whom were adopted.  She had a Phd in Early Child Development.  She also was a search and reunion facilitator for scores of older adopted children.  One of the first things she stated at our parenting classes:

If you don't want your children searching (or longing) for their families when they get older, there's the door.  Find another agency.

She couldn't have been more right.

Dad

Nicely put, Dad, but...

Some people just think of birth/first mothers and fathers as babymakers, put on earth to fulfill their own entitlement/messiah complex.

messiah complex

I hear you, Marion.  And some people think child abuse and adoption go hand in hand.  Whether you're saving children for adoption or from it, there's plenty of messiah complex to go around.

Dad

Demons we must face

Whether you're saving children for adoption or from it, there's plenty of messiah complex to go around.

For many reasons, extremes in beliefs scare me... but then again, I don't hide the fact that I am a troubled, but recovering, soul.  I for one would love to prevent other adoptees from having a horrible adoption experience.  Unfortunately, I feel embarrassingly impotent.  I don't know how to help future adoptees, because corruption within the adoption industry is just so huge, and I am only one small voice in a very busy, noisy world.  I am overwhelmed sometimes by the many things I cannot do to help others.  So I must focus on the small things I can do, on a daily basis.  As an abused adoptee, I can help provide a small glimpse into the life and mind of one who had a bad adoption experience.  I can bring attention to cases that close my throat and make me lose faith in humanity. At the very least, I hope this small effort of mine helps good decent AP's see and think about who ELSE is being approved to adopt, through various agencies.  I would hope the truth, as it can be read throughout the abuse case pages, becomes an enlightening sobering experience.  Those are NOT good foster and adoption experiences, and we need to find a way to stop adoption-related child cruelty.

As far as the messiah complex goes,  we all have our personal demons we must face, don't we?  In my case, this is what haunts me:   far too often I have heard how the angry/non-compliant adoptee was seen as the anti-christ at home.  I wouldn't wish that treatment -- straightening out an ungrateful bastard child, using vicious words and extreme violence or deprivation -- on anyone.   A child should not have to think only God, Jesus, or Allah can keep the abusers and hate away.

Finally, I find this notion that child abuse and adoption go hand-in-hand is really foolish and quite ridiculous.  

I know for myself, my first-mother chose adoption for me... she obviously had her own reasons.  I learned to live with, and accept the fact she didn't want anything to do with me.  [Sure, that hurt, but I got over it.] That decision, "adoption for this little girl" did not get me abused.... it got me placed in the hands of people who did not seem to think about my safety and future well-being.  I have often thought many of these people cared only about personal issues like salaries, ease, convenience and superficial appearance. I was placed in a poorly run care-facility... that poor care led to neglect and a flattened head.  I was then placed in a home that had two parents with a long history of family dysfunction... that environment led to many ugly things.... things I will not post on public pages. 

As I got older, I stopped asking, "Why was I adopted?"  I started asking deeper more disturbing questions like, "Why was I put in those places?  Who made those decisions about my care?  Was there another, different couple eligible to adopt me? Had I been adopted by better, more stable people, would I be just like the many many other happy grateful adoptees out there, praising AP's like they were the second coming of fresh-sliced bread?"

Adoption didn't abuse or neglect me.... people did.  Selfish people, "approved" to care for vulnerable children, didn't care about my well-being and safety and these so-called "loving, caring people" let my life become a living hell.  That's a hurt that doesn't easily go away.

I don't think it's a sin to show readers where child abuse is taking place... if it's taking place in foster and adoptive homes, people need to see it and recognize it as a serious problem... one that needs to be addressed and fixed.  The child placement system, as it has and continues to operate, needs radical improvement.  Having only a few decent adoption agencies - those that limit their interests to the needs of adoptable children - is not enough.  Too many careless profit-minded agencies exist.  Too many adoption advocates cater to the whims of people choosing foster care or adoption for all the wrong reasons.  Too many use God as an excuse to do really horrible cruel deeds, to parents and children.  These type of people need to be removed from child protective services and better care needs to be given to children-in-care, adopted out, or not.

I hate knowing far too many fostered and adopted children are being abused by agency approved people far too dysfunctional to properly care for a dog, let alone a child.  This insanity needs to change, ASAP.... and I'm sadly afraid only a major moder-day miracle will make that happen.  I would love to see the God-Complex removed from adoption... I would love to see more people realize, lazy self-minded workers working for a variety of adoption agencies are making serious mistakes, and those mistakes are taking and ruining lives.

FWICT, Parenting, period, and child abuse often go

hand in hand.

So, no need to get ansty about what is said about adoptive parents - bio parents also beat, maim, rape, smack around, over-discipline ("discipline" ) and kill their kids, put their kids in the hospital, rip fetuses out of wombs to take as their own, drown them in bathtubs, leave them in cars all day in 90 degree weather, etc. BTW, I don't know anyone who think child abuse and adoption go hand in hand, that's made-up.

As for messiah complexes about saving children from adoption, again, I must offer a correction. There is nothing wrong with wanting to stop abusive, exploitative adoptions, including the ripoff of desperate PAPs and coercing women to put their child in a baby mill. Not many people seem very interested in that, I've noticed.

What is wrong with warning people that adoption, adoption agencies and adoptive parents aren't all they're cracked up to be? There is nothing messianic in that.

Strange, afaict, PPL is one of the only sites on the entire webtubules that talks about this sort of thing. Yet put "adoption" in a search enging and all we get is the usual happy nuclear family smiley-smile b.s., as if that's supposed to be some ideal to emulate.

Screw that, it's b.s.

Messiah complex

Lisa Quarles

The same can be said for some Adoption Agencies.  Many actually believe they are the SAVIOR of orphans.  They justify their business (and it is a business transaction) because they are Saving Children.

The realistic adoption agency owners and executive directors have actually been honest and told me there is a lot of fraud involved with adoptions especially the murky laws in international countries.

What happens in Guatemala (insert country here) stays in Guatemala. 

And along with messiah complex comes...

...martyr complex.

As harsh as I can sound about them on the whole, I wish PAPs and APs did not have to go through this crap. It's so unnecessary. It destroys people inside. The ones who "can't have kids", especially the women, get treated like #$!@.

Birth parents

I'm not exactly sure how my wording could have led you to believe that I wouldn't embrace my adopted child longing for or reuniting with birth parents. There is a BIG difference between a lengthy and expensive courtroom battle over an infant/toddler and an older child's reunion with birth parents (for OUR family - thank goodness we are not all cut from the same mold). The more people to love the child the better, in my opinion. Although a reunion with birth parents is not always best for the child in the end, I'm certainly happy to hold her hand and help her find out if that's what she wants.

We have many, many friends who have adopted internationally over the years with children currently ranging in age from todders to adults. Not one of the children are unhappy with their families or life situations. Would they have chosen their lives if they could have? Maybe or maybe not. Would your biological or domestically adopted children have chosen you to be their father if they had a choice? Maybe or maybe not, no disrespect intended.

Now commenting on someone else's mean-spirited post, I absolutely DO NOT view birth parents as baby makers! I view them as human beings, forced for whatever reason to, in most cases, lovingly place their child into the care of others. For most of these birth parents, it will be the most difficult decision they are ever faced with! They have courage that I could only hope I would have if the tables were turned.

I have had the honor of giving birth three times. Just because my kids were born into a family with married, well educated and upper middle class parents, doesn't make them any more loved!

Regarding another posting reporting the tragic lives of some internationally adopted children. I already knew of most of those horrific cases. It is wrong, wrong, wrong! I hope you are not so close minded to think that all parents who adopt internationally (or domestically for that matter) will treat their children that way. I'm not an expert in the U.S. foster care system, but I do believe that statistically the odds would be greater for a child in foster care to endure abuse than a child who was adopted internationally. One child abused is too many! But does that mean that no orphan should ever be adopted for fear of abuse?

Smiles for the crowds.

We have many, many friends who have adopted internationally over the years with children currently ranging in age from todders to adults. Not one of the children are unhappy with their families or life situations.

Ah yes..... I do remember how I always had to smile each time someone told my Amother I looked just like her.  Yes, the ever gracious adoptee, so pleased to have a new identity.

I remember always being told to smile for the camera, smile for all the nice people saying nice things about my nice chosen adoptive parents.  "Smile, pretend you're happy."

I remember just how important that was... looking happy.  That was my job... look happy, damn it... especially if people are looking or watching!  As unhappy as I often was, I still tried to force a smile... I did it for my AP's.  I did it for me... I did it so I wouldn't get another one of those dreaded speeches... the one that came from a very disappointed Amother, telling me how my natural disposition (scowl or frown) was an embarrassment to her.

 

 

 

Read or re-read PPL's homepage

I noticed some people have joined this group or comment only to say how good parents they are, how good parents they would be, how adoption is marvelous; some come here only to say "i know an adoptee who is happy"- "i know more 100 cases";  some come here only to talk about another good case for each horrible case of adoption, a happy adoptee case for each angry adoptee case, ... as if PPL was created to present one case versus another.

Those people are either too stupid to understand why PPL was created and PPL's mission, and they don't do that purposely.
or they are brilliant enough to understand PPL's mission, and they do that purposely to promote their agenda.

Fully African American?

Because we are one of the few caucasian families ready and willing to adopt a fully African American child in our area, a local adoption agency has contacted us twice in the past couple months offering us babies/toddlers.

Wow I wonder what that was like, being an infant up for offer. Thankfully, we don't remember such traumatic events.

The ones that followed, though, those are unforgettable.

What's a "fully African American" child?

Do you mean to say, one who looks like Wesley Snipes as opposed to Wentworth Miller? Cuz both count as fully African American, though both are also so-called "mixed-race".

Welcome to Black America, where things are not always as they appear, and nomenclature often means nothing.

"up for offer"

I had to laugh at the visual.... being the token American black child up for offer!   Gee... didn't adoption solve that annoying little problem that goes along with feeling unwanted?

Perhaps there's a snobbery that exists.... American black is not as good, as "pure", as worthy as African or Haitian black?  I dunno... how many blacks are there for the dedicated AP looking to own his/her own rainbow? 

I had to laugh too, at the comment, "Because we are one of the few caucasian families ready and willing to adopt a fully African American child in our area, a local adoption agency has contacted us twice in the past couple months offering us babies/toddlers."  Oh, if only I had a big happy sticker to offer.

O/T, but not really.... have many dared to look at some of the ridiculous you-tube videos featuring white AP's taking all sorts of credit and praise for proving how NOT racist they are?   It's a real hoot.

You'd think churches were giving free tickets to heaven to any white couple willing to stand-up and adopt a child of color.... preferably from another country plagued by those of a questionable faith.  As an adoptee, it's not polite to be critical of  AP's on a messed-up mission, but seeing what some people will do, just to score a few extra brownie-points from the judging-crowd.... well, suffice it to say, sometimes it renders me absolutely grief-stricken and speechless.

Yes, in my own pre-paid seat here in Adoptionland, I sit and watch in amazement, wondering what's going on in the minds of some people called to save children from harm.

American Black vs. foreign Black

Lisa Quarles

Now that I got signed on to this site, I wanted to express my disgust with some of these "do gooder white families" they have done NOTHING for American blacks - yet fly off to some exotic country they probably never knew existed to adopt a child/baby?

Ethiopia, Haiti, Ghana, this are all hot spots now for adoption agencies.  When I look at the children available in our US Foster care program - photo listing.  A unusual high amount are American Black children.  Why are they only good enough for the people of the Netherlands but not their fellow Americans?  www.adoptuskids.org  (photo listing)

Has the movie Blindside, given the rest of the White Southern Evangelicals an idea that redemption will come from helping a black child?  When they have no further to look than 10 minutes from their front doorstep - like this bumbling blond in Blindside.   Frankly,  I don't care for their motives or guilt that leads them to adopting an African child.  I recently read the blog of a white couple in Tennese that were worried sick about their prospective adoptive child in Haiti.  Yet, I cannot help to remember that Nashville has one of the highest black infant mortality rates in the USA.  How did things get so screwed up?

Some like to draw attention to themselves and show people at church and their community that they are good people.  They have NO IDEA how to bring a black child up to accept their identity and culture.  I have even heard some white couples say they prefer Ethiopia becuase the children don't have the traditional negroid features but more Arabic with light black skin.  

For once, just once in my life I would like to see more Black families in the USA be able to afford adoption.  I have known a few. and had one neighbor that adopted 4 from local county they were a good sweet family.  She brought up something interesting opinions to me from her perspective....She claims that Americans would have a problem if it was black families flying all around the world adopting white babies/children.  I didn't agree with her, but she said that you wouldn't ever see it happen, blacks would be turned down except for local severe SN white kids that have no marketability.

Very sad state of affairs that a kind, bright black family feels that there are such prejudices. Looking around and seeing all of these white families adopting black children internationally-----I may have to agree with her now.         

chart and statistics of Black infant mortality rates in Tenn.

Lisa Quarles

To white people in the south, who decide to fly to a foreign land to adopt a black baby.  Read these statistics and chart.  Maybe your $35,000 would be better spent on a local pre-natal health care clinic than flying 5,000 miles to steal another country's child.

Tennesse has run out of room at the county gravesite for preemie dead babies, now they are stacking them up in one mass gravesite.   We all pay as a society when there are outcomes like this. 

http://health.state.tn.us/InfantMortality/stats_facts.htm

 

It's a fad, and a status symbol

Like the Spanish-speaking maid, Filipino gardener, Indian yoga teacher, and of course can't forget the "some of my best friends," it's all for show and validation from their peers.

They think of us as objects in their little quest for the American Dream, as if our own American Dream is to aid them in reaching theirs.

This has a very very very long history in the US, which certainly doesn't start or end with the care racket, though there are direct historical parallels.

For once, just once in my life I would like to see more Black families in the USA be able to afford adoption.

Blah...adoption is certainly no panacea for us Black Bastards. Please trust me on this. We have different family models -- which conventional wisdom labels "dysfunctional" because it doesn't follow the late-Victorian nuclear family b.s. model -- which often does include adoption. It is indeed still class-based.

There has always been a double standard on what qualifies white PAPs and Black ones. In my parent's case their proto-Buppie aspirations were likely the biggest qualifier. Unfortunately that landed us in some seriously hostile all-white neighborhoods complete with their hostile children, who had no idea why they were hostile, they just were. The stuff people read about in books, and never makes the news anymore, is what actually happened to us.

But there is less internal stigma that our family models aren't like middle-class whites and don't necessarily aspire to be; that crud is imposed by Christian moralists (of which we have many, make no mistake), and people still angry that they can't own us as property, which is in part why are family models are, um, different, to begin with.

Up for offer

I had to laugh at the visual.... being the token American black child up for offer!

More like up on the frickin auction block. (And no, that is not an ahistorical reference, either...) Or sitting in a room in Amsterdam with a red light in it.. This is how people think of us -- devices for their own status, or pleasure.

Perhaps there's a snobbery that exists.... American black is not as good, as "pure", as worthy as African or Haitian black?  I dunno... how many blacks are there for the dedicated AP looking to own his/her own rainbow?

People don't even know what "black" is, using phrases like "fully African American". That's like saying, aww, look at the purebred mutt, how cute. How much?

Nah, this stuff goes wayyyy back, especially when talking about the black children in America. The most distressing thing is, the state of things now is better than it's ever been. That's some f'ed up stuff right there.

I'm sorry

Lisa from Virginia Beach

 

First, I must admit that I'm not always the brightest apple on the tree, especially when it comes to computers.  After seeing a CNN segment on the catholic church potentially bringing Haitian children to the U.S. temporarily I googled "Haitian, Orphan, Catholic, Miami"  and saw what I thought was a Miami Herald link to an article on such a thing.  After reading the article I scrolled down and found the postings of interest and thought I'd ask for help, trying to help others.  Maybe that was a mistake (or maybe not).  Without looking at the web address, only the article title, author and publisher, I thought I was on the Miami Herald website.  As I said before, not always the brightest apple....  It was after I was "attacked" multiple times for my beliefs that I finally figured out that I was on a website with an agenda unknown to me. 

As I read about what PPL stands for, I began to understand.  I am incredibly sorry for the cards many of you have been dealt in life.  It is not fair and it breaks my heart to hear of the abuse.  Whether it's at the hands of bio parents, adoptive or foster parents, strangers or whomever, abuse is SICK.  Thank you for telling your stories and enlightening me. This is YOUR outlet, your website, and I'm genuinely sorry to have intruded.

First of all, "fully African American" was a term used by a non-profit adoption agency, not made up by me.  The social worker meant that both parents were of African American descent and the child was not of obvious mixed race.  That phrase was not meant in any way to be disresptful.  People are people.

Additionally, when we were "offered" potential children to adopt, we hadn't and still haven't paid a thing to the local agency to help us find a child.  We are not even "looking".  We paid a contracted social worker a reasonable fee to complete a homestudy update for us when our family relocated to Virginia.  That was it.  The agency we contracted with for international adoption, well, that's a different story.  Our agency has absolutely the lowest fees of any agency we could find.  They do not make much money, if any at all, and their hearts really do seem to be in the right place.  However, I know that many of you are against this idea of international adoption anyway and your feelings are genuinely yours.  I have no right to try to make you think otherwise.  Do I believe that the idea of international adoption is perfect?  No way.  I also don't think that it's ALL bad or evil.  The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.

For the first time since we started this quest to adopt four years ago, I am beginning to question whether or not we should go through with an adoption.  As a young child I wanted nothing more than to protect the underdog.  As a teen (25 years ago) I knew I wanted to adopt.  This was not decided on a whim. 

I'm not the messiah, nor do I try to make or want others to see me that way.  None of you know me from Adam, but I speak from my heart as many of you do.  I am blessed that my life experiences have been different from yours, but maybe that makes you the better people. 

I've cried many a tear on this site.  The pain some of you are suffering is unimaginable.  I am sincerely sorry for your difficult lives and I hope you can find some peace.  For that reason, I won't post on your site anymore unless I am asked. 

 

 

 

 

Well, like I said...

First of all, "fully African American" was a term used by a non-profit adoption agency, not made up by me.  The social worker meant that both parents were of African American descent and the child was not of obvious mixed race.  That phrase was not meant in any way to be disresptful.  People are people.

Like I said, people (referencing people in general, not a personal attack) don't even know what "black" is, so it does not surprise me one bit that that terminology would come from some adoption agency, I don't care what color people are running it.

But question -- again, general, not personal -- remains...does Barack Obama look "obvious mixed race"?

How about Halle Berry? Tina Turner? Hazel O'Leary? Wesley Snipes?

Prince? Malcolm X?

Don't these flippin agencies know even the *basics* what one drop rule, anti-miscegenation law and blood quantum means for how bogus these categories are?

My advice would be, if one hasn't yet, to go to any Black church this Sunday and see what real live Black people look like. It might surprise.

Future AP's

Thank you for taking the time to join and post.  PPL is indeed different from other adoption-focused websites... I believe it has to be.  Too many quickly assume all adoptees are safe from predation and harm once they are put in their new home.  Too many assume all psycho nut-freaks are weeded-out of the adoption screening process.  Too many assume every person affiliated with adoption services is a good-guy, working to serve children. PPL does not feature the feel-good adoption success stories people love to see and read.... we feature the horrors adoptees are forced to face, because no one was watching, listening, or doing anything to prevent a tragic loss.  It's an ugly depressing draining job, but some people have to do it.

As a young child I wanted nothing more than to protect the underdog.  As a teen (25 years ago) I knew I wanted to adopt.  This was not decided on a whim. 

Like you, I always had a weakness for the under-dog, even as a child.  I saw them as my equals... fellow bottom-dwelling groundlings who understood and knew what it feels like to be vulnerable, scared shitless, and in need of a kind gentle hand.  Those gut feelings never went away.  However, even as a child, I knew I never wanted to adopt... I always saw adoption as something that takes away...  meaning it was a sad thing to do to a child.  [I know that opinion has everything to do with my own negative adoption-experience.]

Since there are so many reasons why a child becomes an adoptee, let me clarify a few details about my own adoption story.  [Long-term readers, feel free to snooze if you haven't started already.... ]   I was the child who was given the moral alternative to abortion and given a new life, through inter-country adoption.  I was never abandoned or abused by bio-family members... my first parents were not drunks or drug-addicts, or killed by an accident, a war, or natural disaster.  They were not political dissidents they were not convicted felons, they did not die a tragic cancerous death and they did not trade me for food, housing or money.  Nope.   I was simply not wanted as an added financial responsibility or mouth to feed. Instead of being aborted and discarded like a lump of unwanted flesh, or given to live with an existing family member,  my fate was put in the hands of complete strangers who were playing God, and paying for my care.  After a 10-month waiting period, I was given to an American couple that wanted (and paid for) a baby girl.  I was an answer to prayers, and I'm sure everyone involved was all smiles because on paper, my new parents had everything a child could ever want.  On paper, my life was going to be perfect.

My perception and understanding of adoption was simple and limited -- back before IVF, adoption was the perfect solution to infertility.  As a profit-making pro-life by-product, I felt as though I had a job... a role... a duty to the people who bought me. I felt as though it was my job to make my new keepers happy.  Unfortunately, my keepers,owners, new parents didn't do much to let me think differently.  I had this secret... this fear... this worried voice inside of me telling me if I was not good, (if I did not make them happy), I'd be sent someplace far worse... a deeper side of hell. 

Only when I matured did I realize others saw and used adoption differently.... and only then did I see how adoption disruption worked. 

This may come as a surprise to some, but I don't oppose adoption entirely.  I think in very rare cases, domestic adoption can be a fantastic solution for a child in need of financial and family stability.  What disappoints me is knowing many many people see adoption as the one and only way in which good decent people (humanitarians) can help impressionable children who are in need of TLC.  What troubles me is how many assume people who pass a home-study are indeed good quality parent-material, and entitled to a child. [How many pedophiles can pass that pay-for test?]   What worries me is how many assume their adoption agency is not involved in convenient over-sighting or blatant wrong-doing.

I don't know if you did already, but please take the time to read our case archive pages, and remind yourself these are only the cases that received media attention.

I'm not here to tell people not adopt.... I'm here to repeat bits and pieces of my story and remind readers there is no law that states in order to help a child feel loved, safe, and secure you must adopt.  For instance there are mentoring programs that help foster kids in amazing ways. [You can do that, and stay local]  However, if you do choose adoption is the right course for yourself, please do your research first... please don't think everyone working in Adoptionland is good.... there are a good many willing (and looking) to screw others... just for the money.

thank you

as an adoptive mother of two children, I would like to thank you for (again and again ) taking the time and the courage to explain your position ( again and again). I have been following the discussions here at PPL closely; I hope your point of view will help me to stay awake and open for different  perspectives, for the benefit of my children.

Even though  I sincerely hope my children will feel on the long run as what they are to us - the most welcome and wonderful people we have the privilege of accompanying - I am aware that some aspects of their family history with us, they might  see very differently one day. You mention the fear of being sent away if not "sufficient" - something so heartbreaking to observe with one´s children, never knowing if you will do the right things to make it smaller or even hopefully dissappear.

To be given the chance to shift perspectives once in a while and to take a look from the adult adoptees point of view is something I consider  a great help.

So this is just to let you know I appreciate the effort to offer the chances you give  for insight and sometimes dialogues, although your main purpose is the exchange between adult adoptees.

Anne.

Appreciated, (and a question)

If you saw me reading kind gentle responses (like above), you'd see me get all flustered and uncomfortable.  I'm a real dork when people are nice to me.  That being said, let me re-gain my composure and continue this discussion just a little while longer.

You mention the fear of being sent away if not "sufficient" - something so heartbreaking to observe with one´s children, never knowing if you will do the right things to make it smaller or even hopefully dissappear.

I often get criticized for not focusing more on the adoption experience in which the adoptee is loved and appreciated, "as is"... faults and flaws and crazy quirks included... as if not focusing on "the ideal" means I don't think loving AP's exist.  I know they do exist... that's why it hurts so much knowing they weren't chosen for me and so many other adoptees forced into hell-homes.  Jealous?  You bet!  It's one thing to be the overlooked abused child in a bio-family.  That's horrible... and it leaves scars that almost never go away.  But to be "saved from harm" through adoption, and then get placed with people who use and treat children like animals or objects?  Really... how is such an abused child... a "saved adoptee" supposed to trust and believe in humanity?

It's hard to appreciate adoption, if you're not appreciated and treated like shit.  [How many AP parents with "RAD" kids would say they know exactly what I mean?  Turn the tables, and see adoption through the eyes of an adoptee who had sick AP's.... the math is equal, isn't it?]

The funny thing about abuse after adoption is, adoptees know it exists, vicious and sick AP's know it exists, but good, decent caring people DON'T know (or worse, doubt) it exists because 1) it is hidden... (the "big family secret") and 2) most people assume all AP's are "not that kind of people".    AP's are supposed to be better than your run-of-the-mill bio-abuser.

So here's a question:  does anyone think adoption agencies know abuse post placement exists?

Question - does anyone think ....

Kerry,

I find this an extremely tricky question to ask and even more so to answer, but one very  worth considering.

Obviously, Adoption Agencies should know that abuse post placement does exist, because it obviously does. The first question then is: Do they know and avoid speaking about it, or do they avoid knowing in order not to have to speak about it, or a bit of both?

Working with children, I am aware of the fact that statistically, one in ten children has troubles with being bothered or even abused - at least this is what credible estimates say. Of course I can lead myself to believe that for some reason, there is no victimized child among "my group" and avoid giving it a second thought  - at some point though, this assumption becomes less and less likely to be true. Accordingly, professionals in agencies might assume that there is only a small chance to come across a person with pedophile interests behind his philanthropy. But as the numbers of carefully screened and tested families increase and grow in number, at some point there must be this sort of "encounter" with one potential criminal among many others with good intentions. And social workers should be prepared for it. In a professional context, people pay a lot of attention to material security measures that will probably never be needed, like, for example, fire alarm/  smoke detectors and fire extinguishers. Strangely enough, the same degree of precaution is not taken for a more devastating event more likely to happen than a fire: That someone utterly sick requests to adopt, who , even if he is one in five  hundred, or two thousand, or whatever figure applies.

That being said, the next question would be why there is so little attention paid to doing research on the subject of abuse of adoptees, and why the subject is not more often mentioned and touched upon in psychological literature and in the education of social workers - at least as far as I know. It can only be  hoped that the idea of a worst case scenario might be taken into consideration here, as is practiced without hesitation in so many other contexts..

So right now, I believe,  here it exists the same situation as it would come up if one denies the possibility of a fire, in order not to have to install a smoke detector -  once the house has burned down to the ground, this carelessness may or may not cause regret and improvement, I really hope it will.

I hope I didn´t misunderstand your question in not taking it for a simple yes / no question.

Anne

 

Many things to think about

Thank you for putting so much time and thought into your answer.... I know my somewhat rhetorical question was a loaded one.

This may sound crazy, but I remember being quite young, thinking, "I wonder if the adoption agency thinks about me."

In my mind, the adoption agency was one person, not an entity.  Therefore, when I thought about "my adoption agency", (yes I was an odd precocious child who liked to "think"), I pictured there being one person who took care of all the details... a person who cared about each child being sent-out to complete strangers.

I think in many ways, I still have that very childish wishful hope that representatives from adoption agencies do in fact keep in-touch with their adoptees as a ways and means to make sure everything is still OK.  I never adopted, so I don't know how that works.... all I know is no one ever contacted me to ask, "How are things going?"

By the time I was nine, I would have had many upsetting things to complain about.... many things people who cared should have known.

In many reported cases of post placement abuse, the adoptee didn't have to wait nine years to be raped, tormented or shaken violently to shut-up.

I don't have answers, but I do have many questions...  and I most certainly appreciate it when any person shows an interest in the issues that very much sadden and plague me and my fellow broken adopted-brethren.

 

Nuclear Family b.s.

This may sound crazy, but I remember being quite young, thinking, "I wonder if the adoption agency thinks about me."

 

Well, if that is crazy, you are not alone in the crazy.

In my mind, the adoption agency was one person, not an entity.  Therefore, when I thought about "my adoption agency", (yes I was an odd precocious child who liked to "think"), I pictured there being one person who took care of all the details... a person who cared about each child being sent-out to complete strangers.

I think in many ways, I still have that very childish wishful hope that representatives from adoption agencies do in fact keep in-touch with their adoptees as a ways and means to make sure everything is still OK.  I never adopted, so I don't know how that works.... all I know is no one ever contacted me to ask, "How are things going?"

By the time I was nine, I would have had many upsetting things to complain about.... many things people who cared should have known.

In many reported cases of post placement abuse, the adoptee didn't have to wait nine years to be raped, tormented or shaken violently to shut-up.

 

I believe this is also related to all that "between a man and his wife"/king-of-castle shinola. It took until the 1970s for domestic abuse to even become accepted just as a concept. Took till the 90s for the so-called "rule of law", hitherto rigged in favor of wifebeaters/marital rapists, in-house pedophiles, rapists of other people's children, etc., to actually take it seriously enough to really do something about it.

Once "placed", out of sight, out of mind. I think agencies prefer things that way.

post placement monitoring

Once "placed", out of sight, out of mind. I think agencies prefer things that way.

I am sure there are agencies that don't give a damn about the children they place, but in this situation they may not even be the most guilty party. Agencies, especially in the last 20 years have every incentive to maintain contact with the adopters, since many sending countries and some states require post placement reports. For agencies that means extra work, hence extra income.

Many adopters will agree to post placement monitoring before the placement transaction, but once they have the child, refuse to comply. There is no way post placement monitoring can be enforced. When an adoption is finalized all attempts to see how a child is doing can be seen as an intrusion of privacy, and many adopters see it that way.

The attitude towards post placement monitoring stems from the same nuclear family bs, where a man's home is a man's castle, where even the adoption agency, that helped deliver the child, is no longer welcome.

"customer service"

Agencies, especially in the last 20 years have every incentive to maintain contact with the adopters, since many sending countries and some states require post placement reports. For agencies that means extra work, hence extra income.

And as the Masha/Mancuso case proves, extra income doesn't necessarily mean extra work.

What is the saying, "the (paying) customer is always right"?

It's a damn shame many adoption agencies forget who it is they are working for and serving -- they are supposed to be working for children, NOT adults who want to fulfil a demented want or need. 

Not always the agency's fault, true

I am sure there are agencies that don't give a damn about the children they place, but in this situation they may not even be the most guilty party.

Or, in cases of us older types, where my APs probably seemed like normal people when under study but 4 years rolls around, let's just say a lot of things had changed dramatically for them, some of which was way beyond their personal and social control, my mother developing a debilitating autoimmune disease being one of of many issues.

And thus, things changed for me, in some pretty extreme ways.

I do indeed wish there had been some kind of followup - perhaps there was and my APs just blew it off or treated it like they did everything else, oh everything is FANTASTIC, we're SUCH a HAPPY FAMILY with the CHILD GOD SENT TO US, what could possibly go wrong, blah blah blah.

Think before you are adopting internationally

Brian;
Your post was so truthful and accurate. However, the adoption of Special Needs is a growing business segment with Adoption Agencies shut out of many international adoption programs.

There are many sites like reesesrainbow, rainbow kids, etc., that cater to the international special needs chldren. Some are very minor issues like clef palate some will take a life time of care 24/7
Down Syndrome babies are very popular as well as Spina Bfida. Many of these agencies and online advocates (prayer warriors) are Stay at Home Christian Moms, who spew out bible verses about taking care of widows and orphans. They use religion as an inducement to encourage couples to adopt- as well as fear instilling threats of "the child will be instituationalized if they are not adopted by the age of 4"

What concerns me is the lack of knowledge, some of these adoptive parents have in caring for a special needs child. They should spend their money together to start more care in the country - otherwise they are just paying for a program to continue and encourage the sending country to duck their responsibility to their special needs citizens on to the American systems.

Please think about Special Needs adoptees

I can think of a few "special cases" in which so-called loving compassionate AP's took in special-needs adoptees and did not-so-wonderful, praise-worthy things.

"Special" Shylea Thomas was adopted by her aunt and found dead found in a black trash bag.  She was stuffed into a plastic bin with mothballs and locked in a storage unit.  Nice fate for an agency approved special needs child, isn't it?

"Special" Lavendar Banks was another agency approved situation in which a 3 year old girl, from China, died from asphyxia and several blunt force injuries.   How "lucky" was she, to have been adopted by a loving American family interested in a child with special needs?

28 "special need" children were adopted by couple who worked as missionaries in Haiti.  Officials later claimed the house the adoptees were living in was deemed "unsafe". 

More "lucky" special needs adopted children, saved through adoption can be found here:  Special Needs Abuse Cases.

May no other "special" AND "chosen" children have to endure such an adoption experience.

 

Wait! You mean...??

You mean to tell me these chosen children were NOT the blessed recipients of messiah-AP altruism, swooping down from Heaven's Adoption Agency in their purple and red robes, all set to save the children?

What??

You're makin' it up!

Adoptee ingrates...sheesh

Help the Children

My partner and I have not been cleared for adoption by the government, but would welcome the chance to house children in the wake of the disaster. I agree that the children would be best served if they could be reunited with family, but until they can be located, or permanent placement is arranged these children require comfort and care that is not available in Haiti presently.

Come on people wake up!
Would you want your children left in the devastation found in Haiti, or would you not be grateful that your children were safe, and cared for until you were able. I believe that as human beings we must step forward and help those who are unable to help themselves.

This offer to house the children is not about receiving funding from the government because I don't want it. I want to make a difference in a life or lives of those living in such a disaster.
If I thought that going to Haiti would help I would, but at this time I don't believe that is the answer.

YES!

Thank you, Anonymous, for sharing my feelings on this! I, too, very much want to help. I certainly don't claim to know it all, but I believe, deep within my soul, that many of us could make a difference, even temporarily, in the lives of the Haitian "orphans".

I would give anything for another family, regardless of nationality, to care for my kids if the situation was reversed.

It saddens me to hear so many negative and down right nasty comments portraying my family as thoughtless, ignorant and possibly down-right evil. Our motives are good and our hearts are in the right place. Is adoption ever completely perfect? I don't think so. But then again, is any parent-child relationship ever completely without defects? I think not.

My father was adopted as a toddler. He was raised by loving parents who did the best they could. Adoption and the caring for children not of your flesh is not always a bad thing as some of the comments seem to convey. More often than not these families who step up do the best they can to raise happy, healthy, well-adjusted children.

"loving parents"

My father was adopted as a toddler. He was raised by loving parents who did the best they could. Adoption and the caring for children not of your flesh is not always a bad thing as some of the comments seem to convey. More often than not these families who step up do the best they can to raise happy, healthy, well-adjusted children.

Good for your father.... he was one of the many lucky adoptees pro-adoption websites love to use as the shining winning example of what adoption can do for a child-in-need.

PPL was created with another adoptee in mind.... the adoptee most people do not want to acknowledge or recognize.  The adoptee who was neglected, abused, raped, sodomized, starved, tortured and even killed by so-called loving adoptive parents called and approved to adopt.

I cannot tell you how chilling it is to read how many people think all AP's are loving and good.  News flash, there are some really crappy adoption agencies letting all sorts of mutant freaks take home a child.  Please remember that as you peruse adoption agency websites.

I cannot tell you how many adoptees, too traumatized to write their story for public review, have told me in private, how horrible it is to keep reading over and over how most AP's are perceived by the general public.... "good loving, respectable people". 

Do you know what will happen if AP's keep insisting abuse in adoptive homes is NOT a serious and significant problem?  Do you know what will happen if AP's keep insisting, "...not MY adoption agency!"

Adopted children will be tortured and die... if not by their owner's hands, then through suicide.... simply because far too few people are taking the repeated words of an angry adoptee seriously.

I would give anything for another family

Only God knows HOW MANY TIMES I CRIED THIS IN BED.... the bed chosen by my adoptive parents.

Haiti news reports orphans already airlifted out-Mormon Church

According to news out of Haiti, the Mormon church already has down a big swoop of orphaned Haitian children- bound for Utah.  This surprises me considering the old belief in the Mormon religion regarding minorities.  Those poor kids will have no choices in their religion.  Also a private chartered plan from Pennsylvania, compliments of the Governor of that state.  One tends to wonder why we don't have this kind of relief for our children that live in the American Ghettos, many have no mother or father either - many are being raised by a grandparent or relative. 

One in a million: the girl who symbolises the orphan crisis facing Haiti

By Guy Adams in Port-au-Prince
January 20, 2010

Her name is Wideline Fils Amie. She is nine years old. Both her parents are dead, and her only possession is the red tartan dress on her back. For the past week, she's been living and sleeping in the indescribably filthy back-yard of the Foyer de Sion orphanage in Pétionville. When you ask how she is feeling, Wideline whispers two words, through her broken teeth: "hungry" and "scared".

Eighteen boys and girls, aged two to 15, are holed-up behind the tattered two-storey building in the hills just outside Port-au-Prince. Their food reserves consist of three bags of rice, three bags of beans, a few yams, and half a bottle of orange cordial. As of yesterday morning, they hadn't a single drop of drinking water left. And a week after the earthquake that flattened their city, the orphanage has not received a single batch of aid.

"I don't know why," says Pascale Mardy, the orphanage's manager. "We have almost nothing left. When the earthquake happened, I had $100 in my pocket to buy food. Now I have spent the last dollar, so we are down to one meal a day. We are in trouble."

It's the same story across Port-au-Prince, where a dysfunctional aid effort is still only slowly creaking into action. Huge reserves of supplies sit on the runway of the city's airport. Cargo ships are marooned at sea, unable to reach its damaged harbour. Haiti's death toll was yesterday being estimated at 200,000. The capital no longer has piles of bodies on the streets. But you can smell corpses everywhere beneath the rubble. Almost everyone you meet has lost their home and several relatives.

The scale of the bereavement is so massive that your sympathies become numb. I barely flinched when Ms Mardy told me she was mourning both her sister and mother-in-law, and is sleeping with the children, in the yard of her orphanage.

Wideline grew up with loss, but the earthquake turned a bad situation worse. She never knew her father. Her mother died when she was six, and she has lived at the orphanage ever since. When the quake struck, she was playing with friends at school. Now, she seems deeply traumatised. "Some children ran out, but I stayed inside. I saw them get very hurt," she whispers. "Now, I am afraid to stay in Haiti. There are many, many people dead; bad things are happening. I am afraid to die too." Has she lost any friends? "Many", she replies.

The state of the Foyer de Sion has to be seen to be believed. A mixture of mud and faeces covers the floor. There is no electricity. Children, usually eight to a room, are now too scared to go inside the building, in case of aftershocks, so have been dossing down on mattresses in the yard outside.

The toilets haven't been flushed for a week. Their one meal a day comes from a cauldron of rice and beans, plus a small ration of vegetables. In the absence of proper drinking water, they will soon be forced to drink from a filthy water main outside.

All 28 of Ms Mardy's children survived last Tuesday's quake. Since then, many more parentless children have been arriving at her gates. Haiti had an astonishing 380,000 orphans even before this disaster, from a population of 9 million. Now the figure could be twice that or higher. Some aid agencies reckon the island may soon have up to a million children to look after. But like many care institutions Foyer de Sion is unable to take any more: Ms Mardy says she cannot spare her food reserves.

The psychological trauma is an even bigger worry, Ms Mardy says. "They won't go in to the house. They won't go upstairs. They have to have someone lying next to them to be able to sleep, and they follow me around and want to hold my hand all the time. They don't have toys here, but to be honest then they don't want to play anyway, because they just have too many problems."

A sudden flood of adoption agencies into Port-au-Prince, hoping to scoop up orphans and whisk them away to new lives could ease some of the pressure. One planeload is bound for Holland today, and another has gone to Pennsylvania, raising fears of a free-for-all in which childless parents are able to bypass normal procedures.

Yesterday morning, a bus from a Mormon Church in Salt Lake City arrived at the gates of Foyer de Sion, and removed a load of infants. "Ten children went to Utah this morning," says Ms Mardy. "The paperwork wasn't correct but they were allowed to go and the US embassy let them in without a visa. They were already in the process of being adopted before the quake, and parents in America had chosen them from a photograph, but where before it would take two to three years to arrange adoption papers, they are now being rushed through."

It's difficult to see how these children won't have a better life than what they now endure. But child protection agencies have already criticised the rush to export orphans, saying a lack of proper procedures opens the door for fraud, abuse and child trafficking.

It's also heartbreaking to see how the adoption process divides winners from losers. Wideline doesn't have new parents yet, but at the age of nine stands a good chance of adoption. Mirlaine Pomelus, a 15-year-old girl standing next to her is less hopeful. "I do not want to stay here because I am scared. I am not just afraid of the earthquake. I am also afraid because the prison is broken and I think someone will come to kill us. Bad things are happening in Haiti."

Newly orphaned children are being handed out for adoption from Pétionville's nearby Mormon Church. Bishop Harry Mardy Mitchell has roughly 700 people in his churchyard, rising to 1,000 at night. Between 20 and 30 are orphaned. He introduced me to two-year-olds Wyclef and Evry, who are due to leave in the next week. "They have had no milk for days, and are living on cookies. They will go to America and become Americans. This is good because we can find parents to feed them and look after them, and give them a good education they would never otherwise have."

The exodus of orphans is also compounding the pressure on Haiti's airport. CNN reported yesterday that the Governor of Pennsylvania, Ed Rendell, was able to land a chartered jet to take dozens of children back to the US. They were previously at the Bresna orphanage, which is run by two women from the Pittsburgh area. The Rendell plane landed on Monday, the day Médecins Sans Frontières says another aid flight was prevented from touching down in Port-au-Prince. The French medical charity has already had to delay the installation of an inflatable hospital in Port-au-Prince because of congestion at the airport.

Other flights full of food and water are still sitting around the Caribbean waiting for an all-clear to take off. The Médecins Sans Frontières hospital contained an operating theatre and intensive care unit. When it does eventually arrive, it could, like the rest of the incoming aid effort, be too little, too late.

Airlift out of tha get-toh

One tends to wonder why we don't have this kind of relief for our children that live in the American Ghettos, many have no mother or father either - many are being raised by a grandparent or relative.

Beats being raised in frickin Utah with a bunch of white-supremacist Morons...

Concernng the tear-jerker article above

Since the article is from a rag in the UK it doesn't surprise me they would lay it in the US to handle it. Just like they expected us to pull their butts out of the fire when their parliament bit off more then it could chew in WWII and many other little capers over the years. Let the other countries send the air-lifts to Haiti and bring home the so called orphans and let those countries, for the next 20-30 yrs  deal with  their angry scared families demanding  their return.

Is no one listening out there?

It has been repeated many times here and on so many websites besides this one. The only children who are being released are the ones who's adoptions are already or close to completion so far.

There are not nearly the facilities here or the UK to house, feed, and care for these children, It took us a week as it is just to get the aid to them that we have so far.

PLUS +There are many so called "Orphans" who still have family in Haiti + who should be allowed to decide where they should be kept.  

It is not our right or place to be yanking other peoples children away from the only homes & families they have known We risk killing them with kindness by doing that.

If not now then 10-20 years from now when their Birth families are unable to bring them home.!!

Plus, there are legal and protective systems that need to be set up to be sure that they would be placed in safe, protective environments.Don't be so naive to think all who would apply to assist them would be doing it out of kindness and love. If their care is put into our hands, their blood wold be as well if those who offer "Help" end up harming or God forbid, kill them.

Keep your emotions in check and use your heads. The life you save may be your own soul! 

 

 

 

"Touched By Adoption, With a Blowtorch "

Operation Pierre Pan

Check out the site - operationpierrepan.org

to the people from Va Beach

Gee, I live here too....

If you really want to help a child consider looking at your local DSS.  They run training 3-4 times per year and you will have a child in your home soon after you finish training... 

ALL children with any level of special needs do cost our government something extra... unless you were going to send the child to private school... even English as a second language costs the government a lot, then you have Special Education, etc...

also you never, ever, never know for sure how any special need will resolve itself or if it ever will...

there is growing concern about how fair and just and right it is from taking any child from his or her homeland and dumping them in America....

and consider that there are children right here in Va Beach needing a home that no one is providing because of how messed up the system is...

everything has its costs...

some things to think about; and wonder what agency you used and how much you have already paid out...

children are abused at a higher rate in homes of non-relatives; percentage wise children are much more likely to be killed in a foster or adoptive home

20/20 did a special last year about children from Russia;  there is a cottage industry in America where adoptive parents can place their children in unlicensed group homes; then the group homes dump the kids at age 16 into the Job Corps (a federal program that costs a lot of money) one place is called the Ranch for Children;

as many as 20% of children from international adoptions end up in the care of social services or "re-homed"

and I won't go into my RAD cult just now; but it is another federal program that ends up costing tax payers money

Personally, I don't care about the money being spent to HELP...  I do care when the money coming from tax payers or from adoptive parents ends up hurting the children (RAD cult, Job Corps, being given over to social services, etc...)

and I also have no problem with money going to help a person with a special need...  

 

Rumor Queen supports Pierre Pan

Chinese adoptions are going down, and are now all about special needs and older children.

Looks like they not get interested in children from Haiti.

The below is from the blog of Rumor Queen's China Adopt Talk Blog:

(CCAI stands for Chinese Children Adoption International, who are now hoping to expand business to Haiti)

http://chinaadopttalk.com/2010/01/22/desperate-target-haitis-orphanages/...

"\\Also from CCAI’s site, a report of them trying to get orphans already in process out of the country. Please see this post for information on how we may be able to help that process.

I would like to somehow get involved in the discussions about bringing more orphans out of Haiti. I’m not advocating allowing children without paperwork to be adopted, but I am advocating getting children in orphanages out of Haiti so they can be kept alive long enough to figure out if they have family looking for them or if they are open for adoption. In a country where it is survival of the fittest, what chance do babies and children in an orphanage have?

If anyone has contact information for the Catholic Charities organization in Florida trying to make another Peter Pan type airlift happen, please get that information to me privately. Or, if you’d rather, you can give someone there my email address. If there is anything we as a community can do in the line of letter writing or emailing or faxing or whatever – I would like to do what we can."

US senators in Haiti, assessing issues -adoption,etc.,

Not sure I agree that my US Senators should be in Haiti to discuss adoptions, but I guess they work for the taxpayers best interest.  Something interesting in this article was how Minnestota is the highest state for International Adoption.  Is the cold weather making the people of the state of Minnesota sterile?

Klobuchar takes adoption concerns to Haiti

PORT-AU-PRINCE (Friday, February 12, 2010) – With adoption documents in hand, U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar is in Haiti today (Friday, Feb. 12) to meet with Haitian and U.S. officials, seeking to expedite adoptions that are still pending for American families.

Klobuchar is also reviewing the status of relief activities to ensure that help is getting to where it is needed with maximum efficiency and effectiveness.

Klobuchar said she will be meeting today with Haiti’s President René Préval and with U.S. Embassy officials.

With the urging of Klobuchar and others, the U.S. granted “humanitarian parole” allowing Haitian children already in the adoption process to come to the U.S. on an expedited basis and join their new families.

Klobuchar said she plans to talk with Minnesota families with pending Haitian adoptions on Saturday.

Klobuchar noted that 24 Haitian children have already been united with their adoptive families in Minnesota since the earthquake on January 12.

In 2009, Haiti was among the top ten source countries for international adoptions in the U.S.  Minnesota has the highest rate of international adoptions in the country.  Since entering the Senate, Klobuchar has been a leader on international adoption issues and is sponsoring legislation to make the adoption process more family-friendly.

Klobuchar arrived in Port au Prince this morning and will return to Washington by the end of the day.  She is part of a bipartisan delegation that includes four other Senators:  Tom Harkin, D-Iowa; Frank Lautenberg, D-NJ; Bill Nelson, D-Fla.; and George LeMieux, R-Fla.  Rep. Jim Oberstar from Minnesota is also part of the delegation.

children filtered

As the children filtered into Miami and their numbers swelled, many went to live with relatives and family friends, but others were sent to Miami-Dade group homes and camps called Florida City, Kendall and Matecumbe. They were then relocated across the country to archdioceses in places like Nebraska, Washington and Indiana.

Pound Pup Legacy