Three Bulgarians arrested in Greece for selling newborn for 13 000 euro

Three Bulgarian nationals have been arrested by Greek police while attempting to sell a two-month-old baby, Bulgarian news agency BTA quoted Greek media as reporting on October 7 2009.

The three Bulgarians, one man and two women, of whom one is the baby's mother, tried to sell the baby for 13 000 euro to undercover police officers who presented themselves as buyers in the town of Katerini in northern Greece.

According to Greek police, the baby was born in August in a hospital on the island of Crete.

The arrest was the latest news of Bulgarians involved in human trafficking in Greece. On June 17, three Bulgarians, two of them lawyers, were apprehended and charged with child trafficking.

They were involved in the smuggling of 16 newborn babies, 13 of whom were ferried to Greek couples. The other three were sent to Bulgarian parents.

Reportedly, the lawyers managed to persuade pregnant women to sell their babies for between 3000 and 5000 leva before selling them on to Greek couples for as much as 40 000 euro per child, the SANS report said.

In June, the United States state department annual report on human trafficking cited Bulgaria as a "source, transit, and, to a lesser extent, a destination country for men, women, and children from Ukraine, Moldova and Romania trafficked to and through Bulgaria to Germany, Belgium, France, Italy, Spain, Austria, Norway, the Czech Republic, Poland, Greece, Turkey, and Macedonia for the purposes of commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor".

According to the data, children are trafficked within Bulgaria and to Greece and the United Kingdom for the purposes of forced begging and forced petty theft, indicating that 15 per cent of identified trafficking victims in Bulgaria are children.

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The middle-man found in a crisis

Financially struggling pregnant woman needs money.  She sees herself in a crisis situation.  A person tells the pregnant woman not to worry,  her problems can be solved with the help of a lawyer.

Reportedly, the lawyers managed to persuade pregnant women to sell their babies for between 3000 and 5000 leva before selling them on to Greek couples for as much as 40 000 euro per child, the SANS report said.

It should come as no surprise lawyers see tremendous financial opportunity when it comes to baby-selling.  It's also interesting to note the word "adoption" was not used in the above article.  How else would one describe the process taking place between convinced pregnant woman, lawyer, and couples paying 40,000 euro for a newborn?

What does surprise me is how one Bulgarian crime is another American praised mission and tradition.

According to Marshall Williams, senior vice president of international adoption for The Gladney Center, Bulgaria has more than 200 orphanages.

"It is Gladney's mission to help these beautiful children find forever homes in the United States," Williams said. "Helping one child at a time find their forever family is what we do."

Currently, six families are enrolled in the Bulgaria program and will be ready to travel to the country in a few months.

Founded more than a century ago, The Gladney Center has placed more than 27 000 children for adoption and helped more than 37 000 women experiencing crisis pregnancies.

[From:  US Adoption Center Set Up to Help Bulgarian Orphans ]

Here's a question:  where do many sick or financially struggling parents send their children to live, (temporarily), so they (the little ones) can receive the sort of care the struggling parent(s) cannot afford to provide?  [Hint:  the children living in these funded institutions are NOT all "orphans".]

Perhaps the only real difference between the shady Bulgarian three-some and The Gladney (maternity home) Center is the former gives money to the woman facing the crisis pregnancy, the latter provides temporary housing.  [See: campus-living at Gladney in America].  Both exchange money and services for a baby, which is then sold to a pre-qualified buyer couple, waiting and wishing for an answered prayer.

Pound Pup Legacy