Child placement forms blog entries



The Americans, the Russian boy, and the Russian adoption authorities

Recently, the adoption blogosphere has become abuzz with the case featuring a Christian family wanting to adopt, a Russian boy with Down Syndrome, and the Russian government.

Greg and Tesney Davis, a couple from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, seem to believe their desire to adopt this "special" boy is being blocked by the Russian court, and their story has made small-time news. The news-media version of the story begins with the following three lines:

"This child is better off just staying in an institution than having a forever family."
 
That's basically what a judge had to say after a hopeful and prayerful Alabama family was questioned last week in a European court room. Questioned by judge and prosecutor. Questioned for FIVE HOURS.

Apparently the prosecutor and judge were having a hard time understanding why the couple would want this particular little boy

Mixing and stirring the Ethiopian adoption opinion

Last week the Joint Council on International Children’s Services (JCICS), the trade association of adoption service providers, started an online petition in response to Ethiopia's decision to reduce the number of inter-country adoptions by 90%.

We already addressed the text of the petition in a previous post, and would like to focus on the actual petition in this installment of the Ethiopian adoption saga. Before we do so, we would like to pay a little more attention to the organization that started the Ethiopia petition.

Joint Council on International Children's services on the wrong side of history again

Last week the Children and Youth Affairs Office of the Ethiopian Ministry of Women's Affairs (MOWA) announced their intent to bring down the number of children placed for intercountry adoptions by 90%, starting March 10, 2011. This decision is not only predictable, it was long overdue.

Since the year 2000, American adoptions from Ethiopia have seen a more than 26 fold increase:

Withdrawal in a relationship

For those of us who feel as though we're addicted to (or can't control) bad patterns and behaviors in our lives, the term 'withdrawal' carries a dread that goes well beyond the physical discomforts that go with ending an addiction.

POV from the pedophile's love-interest, not the reporter

The story of a NJ foster-father, (now deceased), is making headlines in the US this weekend as memoirs of Margaux  Fragaso ("Tiger,Tiger") are making the news this weekend.  [After receiving her Ph.D. in 2009, Fragaso was able to sell the piece that became her dissertation, and already translation rights have been sold to publishers in Italy, France, The Netherlands, and China. ]

International adoption - as easy and as American as apple pie?!?

Found on a blog, a proud friend wanted to announce her friend (who runs a non-profit adoption agency in Something's rotten in the State of Pennsylvania) is opening a new adoption program.  I guess in her excitement, the blogging friend wanted to include the message written by the Adoptive Mother jump-starting two new programs for her private business entity.

Where will adoptable American children go? (Amici dei Bambini wants to know.)

Good news for all concerned adopting Americans, looking to help less fortunate foreigners.... Amici dei Bambini (Italy) is going to help a growing number of very desperate people who want to be parents, and assist 'neglected and abandoned' children left to languish in horrific in-care conditions. 

For those not familiar with Italy's version of  "Friends of children", (not to be mistaken with the Seymour Kurtz adoption agency with a similar name), AiBi, established in 1986, is the initiative of a group of adoptive parents who saw the value and merits of adoption, as only one can when creating a not-for-profit service entity, specializing in adoption-services. 

US Department of State releases inter-country adoption report 2010

Last week the US Department of State released its annual report on inter-country adoption for fiscal year 2010.

The trend of declining numbers of inter-country adoption continued even when the 1090 children from Haiti for whom a Special Humanitarian Parole was granted are included in the statistics. In 2010, 12,149 children were adopted from abroad (11,059 excluding the children from Haiti who entered the country under the Special Humanitarian Parole). In 2009 the total number of inter-country adoptions in 2009 was 12,756, while the US at its peak, imported 22,972 children in 2004.

The decline of inter-country adoption is most notable when looking at the Russian figures. The number of adoptions has dropped under 1,000, while in 2004, still 5,862 Russian children were adopted by American citizens. This figure is unlikely to bounce back in the near future, given the ongoing problems with abuse of Russian children in American adoptive families.

Adoption and Altruism

I've been thinking about the many ways in which adoption gets sold to the public, and one of my favorite misleading paths adoption advocates like to take is the one that teaches newcomers adoption is an altruistic decision, made by people who really care about the lives of children.

While there are various formal social studies/essays written about the stigma of Adoptive Parent and Birth Mother status, I found an excellent blurb that explained, very clearly, why adoption is altruistic from an evolutionary perspective. 

Warning: Free Searches/Services (with a hidden plan)

This morning I checked recent posts on the PPL pages and found a very nice blog-piece written by a person claiming to offer free services to those who lost a family member in El Salvador.  Note, no private email or PM was sent to myself, Niels, or Admin, asking if advertisement for a service for victims can be posted in a blog.

The post, titled, "FREE INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES IN EL SALVADOR ON (MISSING CHILDREN OR FAMILY MEMBERS) IN EL SALVADOR ONLY" began:

Holt's take on orphans in foreign countries

Earlier I read an adoption-related article that began with the story of an adoptee who wanted to marry an older woman he loved...

Child Abuse Study Findings: Zero-percent chance?

 A new study, fresh from the Williams Institute at UCLA, is making headlines these days....

Why the Hague Convention needs revision

This week the Department of State put out the following question on their blog:

How can the international community best ensure that adoptions are transparent, and that the rights of adopted children, birth families, and adoptive families are protected?

It is good to see the Department of State is looking for input, though the assurances being looked for can only be appreciated when realizing adoption is a business and has been around for more than 100 years.

Baby brokering

In 1881, thirty years after the first modern adoption act, several syndicated news papers ran a story about baby brokering in New York City. The article contained a striking phrase: "generally the demand is rather in excess of the supply, and hence the chances of profit are fairly good".

Pound Pup Legacy