Russia blog entries



The role of the US Department of State in the case of Max Shatto

The latest fatality of an adoptee from Russia was all over the news the past few days. The Russian media are heavily focused on this case, while the American press mostly reprinted the same Associated Press article in all major news papers and news sites.

The case of Max Shatto (Maxim Kuzmin) raises many questions, the most prominent of which: why has the US Department of State not reacted to this case before Russian authorities did?

For months Adoptionland has been in a frenzy about Russia's decision to ban adoptions to the United States. Prior to that decision, promises were made by the US Department of State to improve monitoring of Russian adoptions. The case of Max Shatto shows once more, the US Department of State to date is not capable of properly monitoring adoptions from Russia, and any promise to do so can not be kept or guaranteed.

The Russian adoption ban and the evangelical orphan crusade

Over the last couple of weeks, Adoptionland has been up in arms regarding the Russian decision to ban inter-country adoptions of Russian children by American adopters. Yesterday, January 2, the Washington Post added the umpteenth article on the topic, focusing on the group hardest hit by the ban: evangelical Christian adopters.

Over the years, we have paid much attention to the so-called orphan crusade, a mission that is immensely popular among evangelical Christians. The adoption zeal of evangelical Christians is problematic because it arises from faith not from facts and evidence. This is all the more an issue since rational debate is not welcomed when zeal meets revved-up emotions.

The Americans, the Russian boy, and the Russian adoption authorities

Recently, the adoption blogosphere has become abuzz with the case featuring a Christian family wanting to adopt, a Russian boy with Down Syndrome, and the Russian government.

Greg and Tesney Davis, a couple from Tuscaloosa, Alabama, seem to believe their desire to adopt this "special" boy is being blocked by the Russian court, and their story has made small-time news. The news-media version of the story begins with the following three lines:

"This child is better off just staying in an institution than having a forever family."
 
That's basically what a judge had to say after a hopeful and prayerful Alabama family was questioned last week in a European court room. Questioned by judge and prosecutor. Questioned for FIVE HOURS.

Apparently the prosecutor and judge were having a hard time understanding why the couple would want this particular little boy

Russian suspension of adoption is in the best interest of children

Ever since the case of Artem Justin Hansen made the news last week, the adoption industry has feared a moratorium of adoptions from Russia.

The National Council for Adoption (NCFA), the trade association of Christian adoption service providers, was quick with their response, publishing a statement within 24 hours after the case made the news.

The Joint Council on International Children’s Services (JCICS), the trade association of not-necessarily-Christian adoption service providers, was equally eager to make a statement, followed a couple of days later by a campaign, arrogantly called "We are the truth".

Amrex aftermath?

In 2006 Amrex, an adoption facilitator firm from Alpharetta Georgia went bankrupt. With their dedicated adoption software they delivered matching services for several adoption agencies, mostly operating in Russia and Guatemala.

Primary links

Pound Pup Legacy