Orphanages blog entries



Much to do about supply and demand in adoption

Much has been written in the last week about the case of Angelyn Lisseth Hernández Rodríguez (aka Dulce Maria or Karen Abigail) daughter of Loira Rodrígue, and much of the discussion revolves around the question, what is in the best interest of the girl involved.

Ethica puts it like this:

And really, the bottom line is this: in this case, and in thousands like it, there is a child, and she is no longer living with the loving family that intended to raise her. She was adopted by people who love her and intended to raise her, too. In the balance swings the child, her entire life experience shaped not by her parents, but by those who stand to profit from the very experiences that cause her trauma.

While it is certainly true that much of Angelyn Lisseth's life is shaped by those who have profited from her sales, Ethica's statement introduces a false equivalence between her real parents and her adoptive parents.

Reviewing Jedd Medefind's response to "The Evangelical Adoption Crusade"

Christianity Today published a clever response to Kathryn Joyce's article, The Evangelical Adoption Crusade, published in The Nation, last week. The author of this response, Jedd Medefind, happens to be the executive director of the Christian Alliance for Orphans, a coalition of Christian churches and child placement organizations that act like the functioning heart-muscle behind the Evangelical adoption movement.

International adoption - as easy and as American as apple pie?!?

Found on a blog, a proud friend wanted to announce her friend (who runs a non-profit adoption agency in Something's rotten in the State of Pennsylvania) is opening a new adoption program.  I guess in her excitement, the blogging friend wanted to include the message written by the Adoptive Mother jump-starting two new programs for her private business entity.

Increasing the incentives

I read yet another article about the ways in which adoption agencies work WITH certain companies/business to help assist Americans interested in international adoption.

In the name of trust and charity

During our "time-off", I have been researching the history of child abuse within various so-called safe havens for children, and how religion has hurt so many innocent people .

I have been reading blogs written by the abused and comments written on various websites, such as SNAP -- Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, http://www.snapnetwork.org/ .

Living in an orphanage

almost-human wrote: 
"I'd rather live in an orphanage than have gone through what I did in isolation. At least I would have had others going through the same experience."

Hey sister! That’s exactly what I wrote in my memoir (in French)  few months ago. Going through the life as a transracial adoptee (and I'm not talking about the abuses) in isolation and loneliness was more difficult than going through the same experience with others in an awful orphanage. 

The Christian Brothers, a legacy of horror

In several posts made over the last week, references were made about the role being played by churches in both child placement practices and child abuse. The most severe cases of child abuse in church run child placement facilities known, revolve around the Congregation of Christian Brothers.

Pound Pup Legacy