Tim Yee aka Jungbo Mo

Born in South Korea in 1974 and adopted by a US family in 1997, Tim Yee was deported after legal troubles. He was recently found homeless and injured in Itaewon district of Seoul. (Tim Yee and Jungbo Mo are believed to be the same person, if we are incorrect can someone let us know?)

Status: Deported

Home state:

Country of origin: Republic of Korea (South Korea)

Status:

Jungbo Mo

Has a HUGE rap sheet with violence. He is a danger to the public and himself. Why is that not mentioned?

The bigger legal issue

The issue at hand boils down to this simple question:  how can a person, who was was "legally adopted" into the US,  be deported back to a birth-county just because his parents did not apply for a US citizenship? 

Many believe, myself included, deportation should not take place, even if the adoptee has a criminal history.

Tim Yee / Jungbo Mo should be a US citizen

how can a person, who was was legally adopted into the US,  be deported back to a birth-county just because his parents did not apply for a US citizenship?

Exactly.

We have no more information about Tim Yee / Jungbo Mo than the 3 articles linked.
So we couldn't mention details that we don't know about his criminal history. He has one or he wouldn't have been deported (though he would still be in jeopardy of deportation).

But nonetheless, the US doesn't deport citizens for criminal activity. And Tim Yee / Jungbo Mo should be a US citizen.
He would be a citizen except for failure of his adoptive parents to do the paperwork. (And the placing agency for not insisting on proof of citizenship as part of post adoption follow-up.)

Reasons for not getting citizenship

This issue really irks me. But nevertheless, I will share some thoughts on this topic. Maybe Kerry or Niels could provide some insight?

The number of ICA adoptees w/o US citizenship, I suspect is unknown. It is when they are criminally charged that it comes out to light that they don't have US citizenship and thus on their way to deportation. But how about all the others who are not criminals? How many ICA
adoptees do not have US citizenship?

Not getting US citizenship for your ICA adopted child amounts to neglect and/or laziness (jmho). The APs should be made to present evidence to the agency that they got US citizenship for their child. But what happens if the child was adopted using a private US attorney who worked with private attorneys/facilitators in another country. Who do they answer to?

I know APs that didn't get US citizenship for their child. Sighs.

What most parents don't realize is that these kids entered w/ a Green card that EXPIRES after 10 years, thus making the child's presence afterwards when their Green Card expires, illegal.

There is ALOT of arguments and babbling on forums about this. APs reason for not getting US citizenship is: that it costs money.
The other argument is that they got the child a US birth certificate (which states that the child was born in x-country). With the birth certificate they got a US passport. So thus that is enough.

Well...it isn't others discuss. They present that the passport is not proof of US citizenship for those that are adopted and born in another country. The US passport EXPIRES every 5 years for children under the age of 16. And the passport has to be renewed.

With US citizenship, there is never a renewal and it is documented at USDOS/USCIS/SS that the child IS a US citizen and has the same rights of a US citizen.

Please Kerry and Niels if this is incorrect, please explain.

Seems like the theme for today is: Is it really that hard people?

Act of 2000- Automatic US Citizenship (for some)

Anon, I don't have all the answers but you pose some interesting ones.

With respect to the US citizenship, the US Citizenship Act of 2000 provides automatic US citizenship to all adoptees adopted after the year 2000, regardless if they visited the child in the sending country or not.

The thing is, the APs have to apply for it, if the PAP did not visit the child prior to the pick up trip.

If the PAP visited the child, prior to finalization, upon entering the US and going through US Customs, the sealed pack is delivered to the Customs Officer, the child receives their US citizenship document in the mail a couple of weeks after arrival.

I hope this sheds some light.

Passport vs Citizenship

As an AP this is an issue near and dear to my heart. If adoptive parents have obtained a US passport for their child, their child IS a US citizen, as non-citizens cannnot get US passports. However, I also highly, highly agree that obtaining a Certificate of Citizenship from USCIS is critical.
Many ICA adoptions have automatically issued CoC for children (those where the child comes in to the USA on an IR-3 or IH-3), but there are still adoptions which must be finalized in the US and require the AP to complete citizenship.

With only the passport (not CoC) it is possible an adopted person could be detained because even though the person is a citizen, the USCIS may not have a record of the citizenship.

APs - apply for citizenship for your kids!
Adoptees - verify your citizenship status!

RE: Passport vs Citizenship

RhouseKaren, unfortunately, your statement "If adoptive parents have obtained a US passport for their child, their child IS a US citizen, as non-citizens cannot get US passports" is incorrect. For an individual not born in the US, the passport is not admissible as proof of citizenship even though the passport says their citizenship is "United States of America." They would need to produce a Certificate of Naturalization or Certificate of Citizenship. US passports are issued to some non-US citizens.

Green Card - LPR

This statement is incorrect "What most parents don't realize is that these kids entered w/ a Green card that EXPIRES after 10 years, thus making the child's presence afterwards when their Green Card expires, illegal."

The CARD does expire, however, the LPR does not expire UNLESS the child is absent from the USA for more than 6 months.

Pound Pup Legacy