Mexico prosecutor says 4 children seized in child-trafficking ring show signs of sexual abuse

Date: 2012-01-19

By Associated Press

GUADALAJARA, Mexico — Four of the 10 children seized in western Mexico as part of a child-trafficking investigation involving Irish couples show signs of sexual abuse, a Mexican official said Wednesday.

Jalisco state Attorney General Tomas Coronado said the children were examined by doctors but offered no other details.

“There are four children who show signs of having been abused (sexually), perhaps not in a violent way but there are signs (of abuse),” Coronado told reporters.

He said he couldn’t elaborate because of the ongoing investigation and didn’t say when the alleged abuse would have taken place.

He said at least 11 Irish couples are involved in the case.

Fifteen Irish citizens have already talked to authorities, said Lino Gonzalez, a spokesman for Jalisco state prosecutors.

The foreign couples were giving 1,200 pesos, or $188, per week to the mothers since pregnancy, and paying for their medical attention. Then later the Mexican mothers would also be paid for allowing the children to stay with the couples while the purported adoption process proceeded, Coronado said.

“The great majority of the people from Ireland who have given their testimony have said they thought it was part of the adoption protocol in the state to be paying and that obviously means (someone was making) a profit throughout the adoption process,” Coronado said.

Investigators are trying to determine if the Irish couples “acted in bad faith,” Coronado said, or were being tricked.

The Irish Embassy in Mexico said in a statement it’s providing consular advice to the couples involved.

About a dozen state police officers on Wednesday raided a two-story home in a middle class Guadalajara neighborhood that local media said belongs to the lawyers processing the adoptions. The lawyers apparently advertised in a local newspaper for expectant mothers who wanted to give their children up for adoption.

Prosecutors have said two attorneys who owned the law firm Lopez y Lopez Asociados are being sought in the case.

Coronado wouldn’t identify the lawyers but said they have ignored prosecutors’ requests to talk to investigators.

The apparent child-smuggling ring came to light last week when a woman told police that her sister-in-law was trying to sell one of her babies and “renting” the other one.

Investigators then detained the 21-year-old woman, who led authorities to three other women. Another three women who worked as nannies, the son of one of them and a taxi driver have also been detained, Coronado said.

Authorities seized the 21-year-old woman’s two children, seven children from the Irish couples, and one from the nannies. The children are between two months and two years of age.

Agents found that the group was taking the woman’s two children and others to a hotel in Guadalajara where they met with the Irish couples who believed they were going to adopt them. The couples then took the children to the nearby lakeside resort of Ajijic, where they were staying until the adoptions were finished, prosecutors said.

Roy Lahti, president of the condominium association of El Bosque gated community in Ajijic, said some of the couples had been staying there but that they had left.

Irish couples in the process of adopting Mexican children had been coming to the community of California-style homes and cobblestone streets for at least three years. They would stay between six and eight months and often the children lived with them, he said.

“They were really nice couples, always cordial,” Lahti said. “The community here is shocked.”

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Part of the process

The foreign couples were giving 1,200 pesos, or $188, per week to the mothers since pregnancy, and paying for their medical attention. Then later the Mexican mothers would also be paid for allowing the children to stay with the couples while the purported adoption process proceeded, Coronado said.

“The great majority of the people from Ireland who have given their testimony have said they thought it was part of the adoption protocol in the state to be paying and that obviously means (someone was making) a profit throughout the adoption process,” Coronado said.

Duh.  Of course someone profits from an adoption; the profit portion is cleverly called the "service fee".  This enables APs to pay for a child without the guilt.  After all, which sounds better?  "I paid service fees that produced a baby" v. "I paid a lawyer and an impoverished/crisis-facing pregnant woman for a baby"

This is how and why adoption mega-stars like Bethany and Gladney are able to get SOOOO HUGE and act in "good faith", even though it's all changed semantics, making crude ugly baby selling a beautiful altruistic thing.  There is no "trickery" involving the PAPs.  It's not the 1950's.  PAPs by now know what they are doing when looking for a person who can procure an "unwanted" pregnancy. 

What we have is a bunch of people fulfilling their own desires, making the payment for another woman's baby not as questionable as it once was.

Ah progress!

See how great the language of adoption can be?  You can do anything, like buy a baby (and exploit a woman's reproductive organs) and sell babies, and come out of the deal smelling like roses for all the good buying babies does.  [God forbid women be allowed to have the choice to keep an unwanted pregnancy, or not.]

The only time this practice is seen as a scam is when the paying APs are not handed over the baby they paid for.

Amazing, isn't it?

Another part of the adoption process is to remind others the inherit goodness of those willing to travel overseas, stay in resort complexes for months at a time, and immediately take the babies sold through a lawyer's shady "adoption plan".  Such nice brave heros, all of whom neither blink nor balk when they are reminded more cash is needed before the next part of the adoption plan is to continue.

“They were really nice couples, always cordial,” Lahti said. “The community here is shocked.”

Of course adopters shelling out thousands of dollars are "nice".  Look what this type of adopter does for a local economy, where $188/wk is A LOT of money.  Payment in cash is almost always nice, especially if you don't have to document that cash income in any books or ledgers for taxes/the government.

I would also venture to say at one point each parent featured in our abuse archives was described as being "nice", either by an adoption facilitator or social worker.  Yes, the word "nice" works really well during an adoption plan.  In fact, being "nice" and acting "in faith" enables some of the dirtiest deeds in the adoption industry to get done.  [See:  "Who else but a true Christian would take a stranger into their home??" ]

Oh, and the "adoptable children" were found to have been sexually abused?  Well, that's just icing on the very ugly not nice cake now, isn't it?

Morphing

The adoption cartel will just morph into the surrogacy cartel. After Guatemala closed, the adoption attorneys opened up surrogacy services.
No one knows where the "labs" or "pregnancy homes" are, but the "rent a womb" program is up and running. AND...the paying couple does not have to go through the "hassle" of the adoption process (sarcasm intended). Automatic US citizenship is given the newborn, though a DNA test is required to make sure that the baby is half of the paying couples biological child. But we all know about how those DNA test work in Guatemala....hmmm.

Pound Pup Legacy