Portugal sets up children’s shelter as concerns grow over child trafficking

January 30, 2010 / The Portugal News Online

Portuguese aid teams have set up a temporary centre to shelter Haitian orphans and children separated from parents, as international concern mounts over the possibility of child trafficking in the wake of the massive earthquake.

The chief of the Portuguese Civil Defence team, Elísio Oliveira, told the Lusa News Agency the tent shelter on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince was to house about 50 children, alongside the Portuguese aid workers.

“We couldn’t have decided otherwise. We’re here to help and these children are in need”, Oliveira said.

The first four children to arrive were accompanied by representatives of the US organisation Love Beyond Borders who said two of them had been adopted by US families and who have since been flown to the United States.

The plight of thousands of Haitian children and their vulnerability to trafficking after the January 12 earthquake has raised concern among many, including UN agencies.

“At the moment there is no control and anything could happen”, UNICEF’s representative in the country, Guido Cornale, told Lusa.

“We’ve received reports of such situations”, Cornale added, declining to elaborate.

Another UNICEF official noted that Haiti had a history of child trafficking and that “many countries” were not following “international adoption norms” in the post-earthquake crisis.

In a related story, a second aid-laden Portuguese Air Force transport plane landed in the Haitian capital this week, bringing 12 tonnes of emergency supplies and additional aid personnel.

Officials said the Hercules C-130 carried six tonnes of drinking water, two water purifying machines, food and medical supplies.

It also ferried an additional aid team, composed of specialised firefighters and a doctor.

The plane had been held up for nearly one week in Caracas, Venezuela, awaiting landing clearance at Haiti’s congested international airport.

TPN/Lusa

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Future Interests: Adding, not taking away

“At the moment there is no control and anything could happen”, UNICEF’s representative in the country, Guido Cornale, told Lusa.

“We’ve received reports of such situations”, Cornale added, declining to elaborate.

Another UNICEF official noted that Haiti had a history of child trafficking and that “many countries” were not following “international adoption norms” in the post-earthquake crisis.

It's amazing, but not surprising, how so much help is contributing to so much chaos.  But then again, it's my belief there are very small-but-growing-groups hoping things remain very chaotic, at least for a little while.

Yes, I'm one of those people who doesn't necessarily trust the kindness found in strangers.  In fact, I find it very eerie and suspect when a group of "kind looking" people enter a bad situation, and claim, "We're here to help".  Immediately my mind asks, "What is it you're going to take from me.... what are you going to remove... what will I have to learn to live without?"

Those who have been hurt/damaged by so-called well-meaning people know what I mean.  Certain patterns develop, especially during times of profound confusion and utter chaos.... and  it's a gross understatement to say it's very difficult to trust those who seem "different".  In hard times, reputations, and past experience matter, so it's interesting to see how various groups/people are seen by locals needing outside help.  For instance, the other day I was reading an article about a Haitian turned US Marine, and one mission-experience on the streets of Haiti went as follows:

While on a recent foot patrol in the streets of Leogane, a young Haitian man rode by on a bike and heckled the Marines. "So! You think this is your country now?!?"

"Yeah!" Sajous smiled and replied in Creole. "It is my country!"

The neighborhood erupted in laughter. The Marines walked on. And a few Haitian residents began accompanying the patrol, pointing out landmarks and offering their help.

[From:  Haitian Marine:  'I understand where they come from', January 23, 2010]

It's sad to me how so many people see Americans as the enemy... as people who come in, ready to strip and take away, not give to those in need.  But this is the reputation Americans have earned, and this disturbing point is illustrated in the article, Haiti Should Beware the Well-Intentioned.   J. Phil Thompson writes:

Many responding to the Katrina crisis were determined to work “on” New Orleans rather than to work “for” New Orleans. To avoid this in Haiti, we must look closely at the motivation of aid efforts and those who fund them.

Political, religious, and international interests aside, I try to look at the Haiti situation as I would any other poor struggling country, like Malawi or Guatemala.  I try to imagine what it's like, not having a daily supply of food, not having a nice safe, comfortable place to sleep, but having all sorts of  seemingly "very nice people" approaching me, offering to take my children (far, far) away, so they can live someplace "good"... someplace "safe".... someplace "much much better".  [<laughing to myself>.... as if children put in care are not forced to live in really horrific, scary conditions!]

I'm not afraid to admit I would lose my freakin mind if I learned these "very nice charity people" were not only NOT taking care of my children, as promised, but they were selling my so-called "orphaned"children to foreigners with lots of cash.  In fact, how many good decent parents would go berserk if they learned a local humanitarian effort was little more than an enormous business scheme, benefiting those who already have a lot, but are still looking for more?  [See:  100 children remain in hands of traffickers in Haiti, says IOM ]

If all of that taking advantage of people in a bad situation isn't horrible enough, there is one more situation I dare myself to consider.  What would I do if I learned any one of my children, relinquished to strangers, was adopted by abusive freaks?

I wish more people think like I do.... the time to think about future child safety is not limited to an immediate crisis situation.  There are liars, crooks and bad guys taking advantage of the poor and the desperate, and those in terrible situations... situations that should be temporary.  Haiti is not the first country in a crisis situation.  This is not the first time questions about standards and safe child placement measures are being asked by truly concerned humanitarians.  Haiti is simply the most recent country getting a significant amount of international attention.  If dangerous practice within the child placement system isn't considered now, then when?  Much, much later?

Haiti fits a historical pattern

It's sad to me how so many people see Americans as the enemy... as people who come in, ready to strip and take away, not give to those in need.

That's US history, domestic and international. Why would people see us as any different, now?

ESPECIALLY in Haiti, punished by the west for 200 years, and the US who occupied them for 20 years, supported ripoff artist Duvaliers and ousted Aristide, all because Haiti had people as far away as Europe trembling in their boots back in 1804.

That's not allowed, making Europeans tremble in their boots. Venal sin.

10 Americans arresting moving Haitian children

Lisa Quarles

Americans Arrested While Taking Children From Haiti

Updated: 13 minutes ago
Print Text Size

Frank Bajak

AP

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Jan. 30) -- Ten Americans were detained by Haitian police on Saturday as they tried to bus 33 children across the border into the Dominican Republic, allegedly without proper documents.

The Baptist church members from Idaho called it a "Haitian Orphan Rescue Mission," meant to save abandoned children from the chaos following Haiti's earthquake. Their plan was to scoop up 100 kids and take them by bus to a rented hotel at a beach resort in the Dominican Republic, where they planned to establish an orphanage.

Americans arrested in Haiti
Ramon Espinosa, AP
American citizens are shown at a police station in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Saturday, after they were detained by Haitian police as they tried to bus 33 children across the border into the Dominican Republic.

Whether they realized it or not, these Americans - the first known to be taken into custody since the Jan. 12 earthquake - put themselves in the middle of a firestorm in Haiti, where government leaders have suspended adoptions amid fears that parentless or lost children are more vulnerable than ever to child trafficking.

"In this chaos the government is in right now we were just trying to do the right thing," the group's leader, Laura Silsby, told reporters at the judicial police headquarters in the capital, where the Americans were being held pending a Monday hearing before a judge.

Silsby said they only had the best of intentions and paid no money for the children, whom she said they obtained from well-known Haitian pastor named Jean Sanbil of the Sharing Jesus Ministries.

Silsby, 40, of Boise, Idaho, was asked if she didn't consider it naive to cross the border without adoption papers at a time when Haitians are so concerned about child trafficking. "By no means are we any part of that. That's exactly what we are trying to combat," she said.

Social Affairs Minister Yves Cristallin told reporters the Americans were suspected of taking part in an illegal adoption scheme.

Cristallin said the 33 children were lodged late Saturday at an SOS Children's Village outside of Port-au-Prince. SOS Children's Villages is a global nonprofit based in Austria.

Many children in Haitian orphanages aren't actually orphans but have been abandoned by family who cannot afford to care for them. Advocates both here and abroad caution that with so many people unaccounted for, adoptions should not go forward until it can be determined that the children have no relatives who can raise them.

UNICEF and other NGOs have been registering children who may have been separated from their parents. Relief workers are locating children at camps housing the homeless around the capital and are placing them in temporary shelters while they try to locate their parents or a more permanent home.

The U.S. Embassy in Haiti sent consular officials, who met with the detained Americans and gave them bug spray and MREs to eat, according to Sean Lankford of Meridian, Idaho, whose wife and 18-year-old daughter were being held.

"They have to go in front of a judge on Monday," Lankford told The Associated Press.

"There are allegations of child trafficking and that really couldn't be farther from the truth," he added. The children "were going to get the medical attention they needed. They were going to get the clothes and the food and the love they need to be healthy and to start recovering from the tragedy that just happened." Haiti has imposed new controls on adoptions since the earthquake, which left thousands of children separated from their parents or orphaned. The government now requires Prime Minister Max Bellerive to personally authorize the departure of any child as a way to prevent child trafficking.

Silsby said they had documents from the Dominican government, but did not seek any paperwork from the Haitian authorities before taking 33 children from 2 months to 12 years old to the border, where Haitian police stopped them Friday evening. She said the children were brought to her by distant relatives, and that the only ones to be put up for adoption would be those without close family to care for them.

The 10 Americans include members of the Central Valley Baptist Church in Meridian, Idaho and the East Side Baptist Church in Twin Falls, Idaho, as well as people from Texas and Kansas. Idaho friends and relatives have been in touch with them through text messages and phone calls, Lankford said.

"The plan was never to go adopt all these kids. The plan was to create this orphanage where kids could live. And kids get adopted out of orphanages. People go down and they're going to fall in love with these kids, and many of these kids will end up getting adopted."

"Of course I'm concerned for my wife and my daughter," he added. "They were hoping to make a difference and be able to help those kids."

The group described their plans on a Web site where they also asked for tax-deductible contributions, saying they would "gather" 100 orphans and bus them to the Dominican resort of Cabarete, before building a more permanent orphanage in the Dominican town of Magante.

"Given the urgent needs from this earthquake, God has laid upon our hearts the need to go now versus waiting until the permanent facility is built," the group wrote.

Associated Press Writers Keith Ridler in Boise, Idaho, and Hope Yen in Washington, contributed to this story.

White Baptists from Idaho, bleh

"The plan was never to go adopt all these kids. The plan was to create this orphanage where kids could live. And kids get adopted out of orphanages. People go down and they're going to fall in love with these kids, and many of these kids will end up getting adopted."

"Of course I'm concerned for my wife and my daughter," he added. "They were hoping to make a difference and be able to help those kids."

Imagine being a traumatized Haitian kid adopted/abducted from a white Baptist child mill in Dominican Republic then taken to Texas or Idaho or whereeverthehell for house servantry or something much worse or both.

Hey! white protestants! Stop helping!

Human trafficking across the country border

The sick part is these "do gooders" are standing their like they really did nothing wrong.  "who me" attitude is just beyond me.

Who gives them the right to move a bus full of children that are not even identified yet or matched up with their families?  Shame on the Haitians that are helping them to do this.  Why aren't they spending their time, money building an orphanage or home for the children in Haiti, this is wrong just plain wrong.

These people are goofy, they truly believe they are the white saviors of these children.  Sending their breast milk there, it gets contaminated- could potentially get the babies so so sick.

They are the same white asses (and yes I am white) who didn't do anything for the children of new orleans, they lost their parents.  Many were orphaned, without food and water for days.  The relief efforts for Haiti were better than what happened with the diaster that Katrina left.

Follow the money, without a doubt these people are working for adoption agencies and were trying to secure precious cargo - inventory that could be sold for $30K each - do the math .  30 children X $30K  almost a cool million.  Who ever said adoption wasn't a good business has never read the 990 Income tax return of these Adoption Agencies. 

Update to this story posted 5 minutes ago

Some 'Orphan Rescue' Children May Have Parents

Updated: 4 minutes ago
Print Text Size

Frank Bajak and Paisley Dodds

AP

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (Jan. 31) -- Ten U.S. Baptists detained trying to take 33 children out of earthquake-shattered Haiti without government permission say they were just trying to do the right thing, applying Christian principles to save Haitian children.

But their "Orphan Rescue Mission" is striking nerves in a country that has long suffered from child trafficking and foreign interventions, and where much of the aid is delivered in ways that challenge Haiti's own rich religious traditions.

A boy who was part of the group of children that U.S. Baptists were trying to take out of Haiti.
Andres Leighton, AP
Children play at an orphanage run by Austrian-based SOS Children's Villages in Port-au-Prince, Sunday. The boy in the center was part of a a group of children that American citizens were trying to take out of Haiti. The piece of pink tape on his shirt previously had his name written on it.

Prime Minister Max Bellerive on Sunday told The Associated Press that the group was arrested and is under judicial investigation "because it is illegal trafficking of children and we won't accept that."

The Americans are the first people to be arrested since the Jan 12 quake on such suspicions. No charges have been filed.

The government and established child welfare agencies are trying to slow Haitian adoptions amid fears that parentless or lost children are more vulnerable than ever to being seized and sold. Without proper documents and concerted efforts to track down their parents, they could be forever separated from family members able and willing to care for them.

Social Affairs Minister Yves Cristallin told The Associated Press that the Americans were suspected of taking part in an illegal adoption scheme.

The orphanage where the children were later taken said some of the kids have living parents, who were apparently told the children were going on a holiday from the post-quake misery.

The church group's own mission statement said it planned to spend only hours in the devastated capital, quickly identifying children without immediate families and busing them to a rented hotel in the Dominican Republic without bothering to get permission from the Haitian government.

Whatever their intentions, other child welfare organizations in Haiti said the plan was foolish at best.

"The instinct to swoop in and rescue children may be a natural impulse but it cannot be the solution for the tens of thousands of children left vulnerable by the Haiti earthquake," said Deb Barry, a protection expert at Save the Children, which wants a moratorium on new adoptions. "The possibility of a child being scooped up and mistakenly labeled an orphan in the chaotic aftermath of the disaster is incredibly high."

The church members, most from Idaho, said they were only trying to rescue abandoned and traumatized children.

"In this chaos the government is in right now, we were just trying to do the right thing," the group's spokeswoman, Laura Silsby, told the AP from inside Haiti's judicial police headquarters, where she and others were being held until a Monday hearing.

Officials said they lacked the proper documents for the children, whose names were written on pink tape on their shirts.

The children, ages 2 months to 12 years old, were taken to an orphanage run by Austrian-based SOS Children's Villages, where spokesman George Willeit said they arrived "very hungry, very thirsty, some dehydrated."

"One (8-year-old) girl was crying, and saying, 'I am not an orphan. I still have my parents.' And she thought she was going on a summer camp or a boarding school or something like that," Willeit said.

The orphanage was working Sunday to reunite the children with their families, joining a concerted effort by the Haitian government, the United Nations, the International Committee of the Red Cross and other NGOs.

In Idaho, the Rev. Clint Henry denied that his Central Valley Baptist Church had anything to do with child trafficking.

He urged his tearful congregation to pray to God to "help them as they seek to resist the accusations of Satan and the lies that he would want them to believe and the fears that he would want to plant into their heart."

As the poorest country in the western hemisphere, Haiti is in a difficult spot - it needs aid, but deeply resents foreign meddling. Many have an uneasy relationship with American evangelical Christian groups that funnel hundreds of millions of dollars into their missions in Haiti.

Americans arrested in Haiti
Ramon Espinosa, AP
American citizens are shown at a police station in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Saturday, after they were detained by Haitian police as they tried to bus 33 children across the border into the Dominican Republic.

Since Haiti became the world's first black republic in 1804, its people have seen several U.S. military occupations, was wrongly blamed for the spread of AIDS and has been vilified for the Voodoo traditions brought from West Africa. Voodoo is one of Haiti's two constitutionally recognized religions, along with Roman Catholicism, and two-thirds of Haiti's 9 million people are said to worship its spirits.

One Voodoo leader said the Idaho group's plan - to give each child "new life in Christ" while facilitating their adoptions by "loving Christian families" in the United States - is deeply offensive.

"There are many who come here with religious ideas that belong more in the time of the inquisition," said Max Beauvoir, head of Haiti's Voodoo Priest's Association, which represents thousands of priests and priestesses. "These types of people believe they need to save our souls and our bodies from ourselves. We need compassion, not proselytizing now, and we need aid - not just aid going to people of the Christian faith."

Many religious groups run legitimate adoption agencies and orphanages in Haiti. Some of the children in them aren't actually orphans, but have been left by relatives who can't afford their care.

At the same time, bogus adoption agencies also prey on families in Haiti, offering children to rich Haitians and foreigners in return for processing fees reaching $10,000, according to the intergovernmental International Organization for Migration.

Restoring families inside Haiti is a goal of leading aid agencies and the Haitian government. Bellerive's personal authorization is now required for the departure of any child.

Silsby told the AP that she hadn't been following news reports while in Haiti, and didn't think she needed Haitian permission to take them out of the country. She said they only had the best of intentions and paid no money for the children, who she said were brought to a Haitian pastor by their distant relatives.

Child trafficking "is exactly what we are trying to combat," Silsby said.

The 10 detained Americans include members of the Central Valley Baptist Church in Meridian, Idaho, and the East Side Baptist Church in Twin Falls, Idaho. They are part of the Southern Baptist Convention, which is America's largest Protestant denomination and has extensive humanitarian programs worldwide.

It is becoming more common for individual Southern Baptist congregations to run their own mission programs, ranging from sending doctors overseas for short-term trips to undertaking evangelism work.

The Idaho churches had elaborate plans before the earthquake to "provide a loving Christian homelike environment" for up to 200 Haitian and Dominican boys and girls in the Magante beach resort, complete with a school and chapel as well as villas and a seaside cafe catering to adoptive U.S. parents.

"One of the reasons that our church wanted to help is because we believe that Christ has asked us to take the gospel of Jesus Christ to the whole world, and that includes children," Henry, the senior pastor, said.

The 500-member church, where signs taped to large bins outside the pastors' offices read "Donations for Haiti," gave several thousand dollars to the mission, Henry said.

When the quake hit, they decided to move faster. Silsby, who runs an online shopping site in Idaho, quickly put their plan on Web site, soliciting tax-deductible donations while preparing their trip. "Given the urgent needs from this earthquake, God has laid upon our hearts the need to go now, versus waiting until the permanent facility is built," the group wrote.

Associated Press Writers Carolina Correa in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Jessie Bonner and Keith Ridler in Idaho and Rachel Zoll in New York contributed to this story.

Filed under: Nation, World, Crime

Star-fish collectors... what ARE they thinking?

A few days ago, a blog link was added for others to read.  I strongly suggest people take a second look at  Rumor Queen & The Dangerous Desire to Adopt a Haitian Baby because it was written by an AP asking others to reconsider the rush to scoop and "save" children from Haiti ... and why.

The amazing thing is, many child abductors-for-adoption do think what they are doing is good and great... worthy of great praise.  After all, doesn't every poor person want their child to live in majority white society, (spelled: "American", with an arrogant "A") and get a majority white education (spelled: American... a laughable joke in many parts of the nation)? 

Who gives them the right to move a bus full of children that are not even identified yet or matched up with their families?  Shame on the Haitians that are helping them to do this.  Why aren't they spending their time, money building an orphanage or home for the children in Haiti, this is wrong just plain wrong.

Governments like those in the Netherlands, Canada, and the United States of America give these child collectors the right... through international adoption services.  PAP's who write strong angry letters to government officials put on the heat so foreign children can get collected and released to those who paid tens of thousands of dollars for a child.  How many politicians hungry for financial support/votes have dared to disagree with these religious, desperate-to-adopt AP's?

My question is:  Given the very long ugly history associated with forced assimilation, who/what gives white people the arrogance and ego to think they can do the best job raising "poor colored children"?

Quite comical, really.... especially if you knew any bi-racial families. [Those who know just how complex, confusing, and down-right upsetting "being different" can get know exactly what I mean.]

Meanwhile, let us never forget... not every collected child gathered for international adoption gets put into a safe loving non-dysfunctional home.

Some of these collected finds get sexually abused or better, sexually exploited.  Some of these collected finds get disciplined to death.  The lucky of the unlucky collected ones get specially trained therapists paid to teach the non-compliant child how to attach and bond with the new mommy and daddy.

So let's go back to the claim that not allowing an international adoption go through is a crime of the heart.

As far as adoption goes, if a parent decides to put their child up for adoption, then I believe that needs to be respected by the government and other agencies, in the same way that it is in developed countries. To say that a child would be better off with another family member in the country etc is to override the wishes of the mother or parents, if they are living.  [From:  http://poundpuplegacy.org/node/42407#comment-11744 ]

If a child is abducted or kidnapped, how can a parent give consent?  Furthermore, given the nature of some of the abuses adoptees are known to endure, (like belt-beatings for not saying prayers properly ), don't living parents/family members have the right to know what can and might take place in a foreign home?  When it comes to the best-interest of a child, shouldn't some foreign adoption-plans be delayed or even denied?

Haitian Orphans from Psychology Today

 

Haitian Orphans

     Since January 12, the world's attention has been focused on the devastating earthquake in Haiti and the many international efforts to respond to the needs of its citizens. And for those of us who see news coverage of homeless children and orphans, both physically injured and emotionally bereft, we immediately begin to imagine how we might help. We know from news coverage that the U.S. and many other contries have mobilized resources and people to aid in the relief effort. The most recent news about adoptions and orphans is mixed. I will first share what I have learned about the current efforts, then I will offer a perspective posted by a children's organization in Haiti, and last I will focus on realistic next steps, especially for readers who may be thinking about adopting a Haitian orphan.

     On January 20, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced that the State Department is heading up a joint task force with the Departments of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services to focus on orphans and unaccompanied minors. They hope to streamline the process of adoptions and ensure that these families are united as quickly as possible while still guaranteeing that proper safeguards are in place to protect children. An interagency working group has been established to focus on the humanitarian needs of highly vulnerable children. Also, the Administration is also working closely with the many members of Congress who are understandably very concerned about this process.

     On January 18, Secretary Napolitano announced humanitarian parole for certain Haitian orphans. The focus in this effort remains on family reunification and makes every effort to be vigilant not to separate children from relatives in Haiti who are still alive but displaced, or unknowingly to assist criminals who traffic in children in such desperate times. As a result there is active discouragement of the use of private aircraft to evacuate orphans. All flights must be appropriately coordinated with the U.S. and Haitian governments to ensure proper clearances are granted before arrival in the U.S. Already some orphans have arrived in the U.S. as the Haitian government has loosened its policy on visa requirements to expedite the adoption of orphans under special conditions: those who have family members living here in the U.S. and orphans who have U.S. adoptive parents who are already in the process of adopting them.

     Clearly the urgency to help is being tempered by a concern that too hasty a rush to action may result in traumatic mis-steps. Even before the earthquake there were 380,000 children in Haiti who lived in orphanages or group homes, reports the United Nations Children's Fund. Now the U.S. State Department estimates there could be thousands more children left without parents.

     On this issue, a conservative note is being sounded by a children's organization in Haiti, "SOS Children's Villages," that cautions people against rushing to adopt earthquake orphans. Stating that over 80% of these children (estimated by SOS to be between 5-10,000) will have some traceable family who are in some position to care for them, this organization reminds readers that too vigorous an effort to expedite and initiate new adoptions could misidentify children separated from their families in the quake. One of the issues that always arises with international adoption is losing the child's culture. Even with the lower estimates of numbers of orphaned children, SOS concurs with other sources that "the number of orphans is still horrific and the conditions of them and other children have deteriorated sharply."

     So, the question remains of how one can extend help at a time when reaching out to adopt may be premature. At the request of President Obama, former Presidents Bush and Clinton are coordiating private assistance and urging Americans to help at www.clintonbushhaitifund.org You also can text QUAKE to 20222 to charge a $10 donation to the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund (the donation will be added to your cell phone bill). And you can identify more ways to help through the Center for International Disaster Information (www.cidi.org)

     As our hearts reach out especially to the orphans and homeless children of Haiti, we also must respect the importance of every effort to help keep these children close to their culture and heritage, close to extended family members, and close to community efforts to rebuild their lives.

 

Bus smugglers bring more hardships to adoption in Haiti

02/01/2010 9:51 PM

Adoption Services In KELOLAND Concerned

 

 
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Posts
Officials in Haiti say they're thinking of sending 10 American Baptists to the United States for prosecution. The missionaries were arrested over the weekend for trying to take 33 children out of the country. They say they were trying to rescue abandoned children. Organizers with adoption programs in KELOLAND say situations like this may lengthen the process even more.

Nearly three weeks after a 7.0 earthquake devastated Haiti, the country is still without enough food, water and shelter for everyone who was left homeless.  People in the U.S. want to help, and that's exactly what a group of missionaries from Idaho claimed they were doing when they were arrested as they tried to take children cross the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Dede Mogck with Lutheran Social Services says situations like this could affect those who are following the rules.

"There are legal restrictions and laws in place, people need to follow, simply because it's things like that, the people in trouble and holds up the process, possibly for other people,” Mogck said.

Mogck says before the earthquake, it took two to three years to bring a child to South Dakota. But now adoption programs have no idea how long that same process will take.

"It was long enough before the earthquake.  Now after the earthquake, those children who may have been orphaned by the earthquake, their goal is to find family members and they're saying it may take one to two years before those children would even be considered orphans,” Mogck said.

Mogck says Lutheran Social Services deals with several countries for international adoptions and she says all of them have some sort of safeguards in place.

"This is not always uncommon.  A lot of countries will recognize that maybe those things are happening in their country, and that they need to put up more safeguards and it has halted adoptions in different countries, why they set up an infrastructure and process to protect their kids,” Mogck said.

In the end, people who are trying to bring over orphans legally may be faced with tougher screenings, more paperwork and longer wait times.

Since the earthquake, Mogck has received dozens of inquiries about international adoption. But because there are so many questions and unknowns about the process right now, she's waiting until the Haitian government can get things under control before recommending adoption.

Picture of "Christian" charity workers...

Just logged on after hearing about the Hiati "orhans" and have to have a rant!. The workers look chillingly like "freash faced and clean living people, oozing compassion and willing to help". I also note that they are of "Baptist" persuaision.

The Baptists over here are the same people that we have to deal with in child services. They are throughout our social services and specialise in providing services for (focussing on) young, healthy teen mothers, presumably with healthy ( not drug addicted ) babies, especially those who have been rejected by their families. What makes them so hard to deal with is that they really believe that they are on a "mission from God" to "rescue" children from the evils of "bad"(or God forbid un-Christian) upbringing environments, (consisting of the poor in developing countries, or in developed countries welfare dependant children). I never joined the dots when I was targetted, until a friend ( and peer mother) said that she'd noticed that many women who were involved with drugs etc, got to keep their children or ended up with extended family adoptions, and received all sorts of services, including help to reconcile with their families. We were never offered anthing like this.

They also deal in child care services for working mothers. One friend, (in her 40's now and a professional person)  is currently locked in a battle to maintain contact with her fostered child ( now aproaching his teens) after she became ill and had to give up full time work. The picture sent a chill through me. It frightens me that they "piggy-back" onto the provision of aid for "families at risk" as I listened to their pleas of being "misunderstood" on our radio. May be the fact that the public is beginning to understand all too well is hopefully beginning to take it's toll on them. Notice they avoid putting their primary efforts into providing services that include helping to locate and reunite the existing parents and extended families of the children ....an orhanage administration that is "not familiar" with the required paperwork???? Oh Come On! Sorry experience has made me a complete skeptic! BLOG ON!

 On a lighter note...Heard a good theme tune to this, a song called "God Loves Me But He Can't Stand You" by the Texas Lounge Lizzards (on UTube).

Cheers!

Kids a napping all the way from their Haitian familes.

Why didn't they just

rent a pink ice cream truck that shows the

flavors of the potiental adoptive Baptist Parents

 on the side, with their cars, swimming pools,

country club status, and credit cards.

 

They could have added a little "fairy music" to the mix, so

as they drove out of Haiti, the "orphans" could be soothed with

magical music from the states.

 

Reminded me of Scott and Karen Banks, Focus on Children and how the

kids were only going away to study in their new adoptive homes,

 and could return at the age of

18, that is if they wanted to return to Samoa.........

 

Kidnapping at it's best.

LMFAO!

Reminded me of Scott and Karen Banks, Focus on Children and how the kids were only going away to study in their new adoptive homes,  and could return at the age of  18, that is if they wanted to return to Samoa.........

This very remembrance inspired my most recent rant.  See:  What WILL they do next?

A sick laugh creeps inside of me.

I know I have to keep reminding myself not all adoptive home situations are bad.  ["not ALL are bad.... not ALL are bad, god-fucking-damn... not ALL are bad"]

It's hard not to use personal experience, as a guide. 

Protecting Haitian children from Cowboy adoptions

from: pak-model.blogspot.com

February 2, 2010

The failed attempt by the New Life Children's Refuge to take 33 Haitian children into the Dominican Republic has shed light on the activities of groups that disregard the rules of international adoption.

Even before the earthquake, Haiti was known as a nation of orphans. Now there are countless more.

In the past few weeks, child welfare organisations have been flooded with offers from families in the US and elsewhere willing to adopt children.

And humanitarian agencies say the Idaho-based Christian group New Life Children's Refuge is not the only organisation that has been spiriting children away without documentation, wanting to give them a better life elsewhere.

"In these kinds of situations, there are all types of charities and church groups with, to be fair, good intentions," says Richard Danziger, head of counter trafficking at the International Office of Migration (IOM).

"But that's not the way to go about it - it doesn't help an already messy situation. Children with no documentation get whisked away, and their families don't know what has happened to them."

Mr Danziger describes it as "cowboy adoption".

"Not only is it against the law, but it is taking advantage of people in a lousy situation," he said.

Haitian Social Affairs Minister Yves Christallin said: "This is abduction, not adoption."

Rules of engagement

There are clear parallels with the Zoe's Ark case in 2007, when members of a French charity were convicted in Chad of abducting 103 children whom they wrongly claimed had been orphaned in the war in Darfur.

It was a case that embarrassed France. An investigation by the UN found that the children were not orphans and were, in fact, from Chad not Sudan.

Members of the group, Zoe's Ark, insisted they had been driven by compassion to help the children. Similarly, a member of the New Life Refuge said the children it took from an orphanage in Haiti had been "in need of God's love and compassion".

Ahead of their trial, Zoe's Ark also argued that evacuating children in danger was provided for under the Geneva Convention.

But this approach flies in the face of the rules of engagement followed by the bigger aid agencies, in line with the Hague Convention.

Louise Fulford, care adviser with Save The Children, says the priority is to keep the children within their "communities, their ethnic group and their cultures."
Under the Hague Convention there is a preference for family-based solutions, she says. The second preference is to consider national adoptions, and when these solutions are not feasible then inter-country adoption would be a viable option.

Adoption within the country will be hardest to arrange with children who have health problems, such as HIV/Aids, disabilities, or many siblings. "Unfortunately, with inter-country adoption, it tends to be more the parents choose the child. People tend to want to adopt healthy babies," Ms Fulford says.

UN guidelines stipulate that there should be no national or international adoptions for two years, she adds.

"This provides time to trace relatives. In most emergencies you can trace family members. It will take time. In the meantime, aid agencies are prioritising children who are unaccompanied - they are being referred to interim care centres. Agencies are working day and night to locate children on their own."

Trafficking

Ms Fulford describes the situation in Haiti as "unique" in terms of the scale of the emergency and of the underlying problems that existed before the emergency.

These problems include a history of child-trafficking and a traditional pattern of families sending children away to live in other, more prosperous households.
"Before the earthquake, the Haitian government estimated that about 2,000 children a year were being trafficked out of Haiti," said Unicef's Roshan Khadivi by phone from Port-au-Prince.

"These children generally find themselves in situations of domestic labour, sexual abuse or illegal adoption. We understand from the Haitian Government that most them end up in the US and Canada."

Since the earthquake, Unicef has set up five "safe spaces" - their term for temporary orphanages - where children receive food, shelter and psycho-social support, and are kept out of the hands of undesirables.

"This system was first employed in Aceh after the tsunami, and 90% of those children were reunited with family members," says Ms Khadivi.

'Restaveks'

The other problem, of children being sent away by their families, has given birth to a word in the Creole language - restavek, from the French "rester avec, meaning "to stay with".

In some cases, parents believe they are sending their children to legitimate orphanages, though the reality is that they are often put to work, living as virtual slaves. Occasionally children are sold for money.

One estimate suggests that there were 300,000 restavek children in Haiti before the earthquake, so it is easy to understand why some might argue the children would be better off elsewhere.

But experts say it is not that simple, even in the case of families who have a history of sending children into servitude.

"Families acted out of desperation, they may have had no other option," says Save The Children's Louise Fulford.

"It is not because they would choose that lifestyle for that child. Funding should really be available to community and family so that they are not forced to give up their children."

She says she understands that agencies such as New Life Children's Refuge may have good intentions.

"They see news reports and feel empathy for the children of Haiti," she says.

"They will rush to consider inter-country adoption without a full understanding that it's not in the child's best interests."

"cowboy adoptions"

Mr Danziger describes it as "cowboy adoption".

"Not only is it against the law, but it is taking advantage of people in a lousy situation,"

"Taking advantage of people in a lousy situation" <Hmmm....> that seems to be a repeating theme throughout the history of child placement and adoption services.  For instance, what happened during the closed-era of adoption, back when unmarried women got pregnant and found themselves stuck in a lousy situation?  The unwed mothers were sent to live at maternity homes.  After birth, new documents were made.... names, identities and birth dates were changed... all so no shame would be brought to a "good family".

Back then, the cowboys were....yeeeep.... highly religious folk stuck on their moral high-horse.  They saved pregnancies (not wanted by extended family members, but wanted by the infertile), and thanks to those highly skilled wrangling heroes, they not only prevented many abortions, they convinced the infertile to adopt, to boot.   Yee Haw... how lucky for so many of us sent to live with equally messed-up dysfunctional families!

2/4 Haitian judge charges 10 with child kidnapping, in jail

Not sure if this judge will go through with the prosecution of these 10 Baptists from Idaho.  The judge might be putting out a message to the international community that this type of actions will not be tolerated by other countries.  Who gives any country the right to go into another and whisk the children across the border with pink tape on them - like identifying precious cargo.   This amazes me that these people are from Idaho since that state has one of the larges "skin head" and racist groups around.  A black child is not safe in the state of Idaho.  To the Haitian judge; fine the Baptist church and use the money to pay for another orphanage for the children. 

A Haitian attorney says 10 Americans detained in Haiti for trying to take 33 children out of the country after the Jan. 12 earthquake have been charged with child kidnapping.

Edwin Coq says the Americans also are charged with criminal association. The 10 appeared in court Thursday and were whisked away to a jail in Haiti's capital of Port-au-Prince.

Coq attended the session and has represented the group here.

Just minutes earlier, an attorney for the Americans in the neighboring Dominican Republic had said he expected nine of the 10 members of an Idaho-based church group were going to be released. <!--relatedLinks-->

(Copyright ©2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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Since when did this become about safety?

Oh, I sure did have a good chuckle....

This amazes me that these people are from Idaho since that state has one of the larges "skin head" and racist groups around.  A black child is not safe in the state of Idaho.

When on a religious mission, what better prop to bring in to the masses than the most loathsome creature?

This is age-old "Look-how-much-I-am-NOT-a-hater" behavior. 

Now imagine being the human prop used in this game.... a game based on looks and gaining approval.

Don't have to imagine

It's not just "Idaho" that's unsafe, either.

Try going to school, work, even be left alone every day and being the only loathsome creature around, for miles.  Or just going outside one's door.

This is age-old "Look-how-much-I-am-NOT-a-hater" behavior.

That's actually a somewhat new phenomenon. You might enjoy Invisible Man (1952) Ellison nailed the stupefying, patronizing good-intentioned-white hypocrisy on that issue. I doubt they were even trying to place Haitian children in Idaho. Not even Southern Baptist dorks from white separatist country USA could be that dense.

Idaho Aryan Nation headquarters

Black children and other ethnic groups are not safe in Idaho, this is a haven for white supremacist groups like the Aryan Nation.  Who by the way profess to be strong Christians as well.   

Aryan Nations/Church of Jesus Christ Christian


Recent years have not been kind to Aryan Nations, once the country's most well-known neo-Nazi outpost. Bankrupted by a lawsuit from a mother and son who were assaulted by Aryan Nations guards, the group lost its Idaho compound in 2001. Though he continued to serve as Aryan Nations’ leader, Richard Butler suffered the effects of age and ill health, and the group splintered into factions in 2002. Butler claimed to be reorganizing Aryan Nations but died in September 2004, leaving the group’s future as uncertain as ever.

Aryan Nations Symbol

Founder and Leader: Richard Butler (1918-2004)
Splinter groups (and leaders): Tabernacle of Phineas Priesthood ( Charles Juba, based in Pennsylvania); Church of the Sons of Yahweh (Morris Gullett, based in Louisiana)
Founded: Mid-1970s
Headquarters : Hayden, Idaho
Background: Butler first became involved with the Christian Identity movement after serving in the U.S. Air Force during World War II. He studied under Wesley Swift, founder of the Church of Jesus Christ Christian, until Swift died. Butler then formed Aryan Nations.
Media: Internet, videos, posters, e-mail, chat rooms, online bulletin boards, conferences. Ideology: Christian Identity, white supremacy, neo-Nazi, paramilitary Connections: Aryan Nations has had members in common with several other white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups, including National Alliance, the Ku Klux Klan and The Silent Brotherhood/The Order Recent Developments: Once the most well-known neo-Nazi group in the United States, Aryan Nations has suffered substantially in recent years due to Butler’s ill health, and a lawsuit that cost the group its Northern Idaho compound in 2001. Butler agreed to share power with Kreis and Redfeairn later that year, but the arrangement dissolved into internal squabbling. Eventually three groups competed for Aryan Nations' dwindling number of followers. It is unclear how Butler’s death in September 2004 will affect the group.

One of the 10 Haitian kidnappers due in Idaho Court.

It seems that her ex employees are suing her, gotta love the name of the business Personal Shopper.  Perhaps she was in Haiti doing some "personal shopping" for her rich white clients?

February 4, 2010, 4:15 pm <!-- date updated --><!-- — Updated: 8:38 am --><!-- Title -->

Woman Detained in Haiti Also Due in Idaho Court

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DESCRIPTIONRodrigo Abd/Associated Press Laura Silsby, center, who led a Baptist group to Haiti, smiled on Thursday despite learning that she and her nine team members would be charged with kidnapping.

Last Updated | 9:30 p.m. Laura Silsby, who led a Baptist group on a mission to Haiti that resulted in all 10 members of her team being charged with kidnapping on Thursday by Haitian authorities, also faces legal troubles back home in Boise, Idaho, in the form of two lawsuits.

According to a report in her hometown newspaper, the Idaho Statesman, Ms. Silsby, the founder and C.E.O. of PersonalShopper.com, is being sued by a former employee for unpaid wages and by a law firm for unpaid fees. The Statesman reports that she is due in a Boise court next Wednesday in connection with the suit by her former marketing director — a jury trial in that case is scheduled to start on Feb. 22 — and again in March in a suit filed by a local law firm.

The Boise newspaper says that the suit filed by her former employee charges that Ms. Silsby, who was named eWomenNetwork’s “International Businesswoman of the Year” in 2006, “repeatedly told plaintiff that she had investors ‘committed,’ that the money was being ‘wired,’ and that investors were going to be providing funds,” so that she could meet her payroll obligations.

On Thursday, the Idaho Department of Labor confirmed to The Lede that 14 claims for nonpayment of wages were filed against Personal Shopper Inc. in 2008 and 2009. In an article on Ms. Silsby published on our Web site on Thursday night, my colleague William Yardley reports: “Employees won nine of the cases, forcing Personal Shopper to pay nearly $31,000 in wages and $4,000 in fines. The state Department of Labor initially put liens on a company bank account to get the money.”

The Idaho newspaper also notes that Ms. Silsby has been sued four other times in the past three years by businesses seeking payment.

As The Lede noted on Wednesday, news organizations, including The New York Times, CNN and The Associated Press, have reported that many of the children with the Americans were not orphans, as Ms. Silsby had initially claimed.

This video report from The Associated Press shows the badly damaged village some of the children came from, where parents said they gave their children willingly to the group, but on the understanding that the children would not be put up for adoption

"that is if they wanted to return...."

"Reminded me of Scott and Karen Banks, Focus on Children and how the kids were only going away to study in their new adoptive homes,  and could return at the age of  18, that is if they wanted to return to Samoa........."

From the personal experience of myself and my peers (mothers) ,who have suffered child removal on account of our social status as parents. That is as , "wives, and partners who had suffered  loss or abandonment by our partners and/or families". We were initially offered the "newly contstructed" benefits and rights under the relatively recent (post war) welfare safety net. We had however been already branded as social outcastes, by whichever route our sole parenthood came.

One of the most painful things to have to endure as a parent who ends up in this situation is the experience of being prey to wealthy do gooders and their oragnisations (fake charities), compounding the shame of loss of our partners. They pitch their considerable ability to "buy" the regard and loyalty of our children by taking in our children with false promises and securing their ownership rights by demonising our love as cold hearted abandonment and thus ensuring permanent deprivation for us of our families, grandchildren and genetic heratige at their will. AND THEY STILL COME UP SMELLING LIKE ROSES! because we and our peers often see no choice but to let them get away with it.

 The task ahead of us is fraught with all the obsticles of those who "came out of the closet" in the sexual revolution. There is much we can learn from readingh about their journey. Our struggle is on a similar paridyme, but with much harder odds. We are rapidly coming back to an era when positive inclusion is once again only available to the wealthy and privilaged. I have read that in many ancient civilisations slaves had no right to childrearing, and our society is becoming no different. Question is who do we identify as slaves?    

No need to go all the way back to ancient civ's, try our own

I have read that in many ancient civilisations slaves had no right to childrearing, and our society is becoming no different. Question is who do we identify as slaves?   

Or, I'm guessing from the "s" for "z" in your words you're not from the USA? Dunno.

Slavery officially ended here in 1865 so IMO identifying oneself or anyone else (the purpose of which is still unclear to me) as a slave is not the route to take. And yeah, the descendents, not only of slaves but targets of other family-destroying governmental policies like Indian removal/Trail of Tears/Indian schools/forced assimilation and outright MURDER, have always had to make-do with what we had and also find a way to thrive in the face of total dehumanization if not outright MURDER.

There is also no need to compare situations with coming out of the closet and say yours is worse. People deal with multiple issues at the same time like being gay AND first parents AND not-rich and all manner of other things, every day.

Promoting slavery by default and piecemeal action...

"There is also no need to compare situations with coming out of the closet and say yours is worse. People deal with multiple issues at the same time like being gay AND first parents AND not-rich and all manner of other things, every day."

I hear a strong message of "so what" in your message. It is easy to be psychologically trapped when one is profoudly effected by something and it is easy to see it in terms that only relate to themselves. My point is not about gays or coming out of the closet.

It is about fundamental Human Rights and our responsibility to campaign to establish and ensure legal rectification to enable the protection of our children against child and human trafficers. We must be prepared to, being part of civilisation and being a parent, especially as members of that civilisation who have experience in this situation, to call for the intervention of international governance, on behalf of children, whom our rulers in whatever form, are alowing business interests to damage by exploitation and economic comodification, using religion, social status,economic status, and any other means available without protest. We need to do this at an international level to ensure that human traffickers are stopped, and have no place to hide. Not to do so is condoning slavery and allowing it to thrive.  

"So what"?

I hear a strong message of "so what" in your message. It is easy to be psychologically trapped when one is profoudly effected by something and it is easy to see it in terms that only relate to themselves. My point is not about gays or coming out of the closet.

Then you should not have used the comparison, or the terminology.

What you read is not "so what" it's been there/done that/still doing it, so unlike someone who can only guess about it, I know where the comparisons begin and end.

Not sure who you think is condoning slavery around here but please do get it right.

On condoning slavery,

Havent you heard the famous saying that states the idea that ..."evil flourishes when "good men" do nothing" (about it) in case you loose the thead I am talking about the fact that the business of human trafficing in any form is the slave trade.

As well... Wars and natural disasters produce a flurry of popular attention to human rights issues of poverty and hunger. It should be well known to us that conditions of chaos are the feeding grounds of corruption. Often the huge effort to get on top of this type of chaos is often the harbinger of institutionalised human rights abuses. World leaders and activists efforts just get "burnt out" and the aftermath of calm after chaos often finds that individual human rights get overlooked and the victims are brushed aside, especially as new crises develop elsewhere. It is however abhorrant that this is often used as a excuse to minimise individual human rights issues taking place in so called "peaceful" environments. A bully is still a bully. Dealing with it is part of the human condition. To minimise the exploitation of another human being is to condone that exploitation by default, two wrongs do not make a "right".

To illustrate this I have posted a copy of this article from the Netherlands... 

Illegal aliens like Helen can't hack it in the Netherlands

By Sheila Kamerman
February, 11 2010

Thousands of illegal aliens lead clandestine lives in the Netherlands. Mayors fear an amendment to immigration law will hit the most vulnerable.

Helen is eight months pregnant and lives in an apartment provided to her by the Rotterdam municipality. A great improvement from the street she used to sleep on. Helen (36) left her native Ethiopia more than 20 years ago and came to the Netherlands in 2000. She has been homeless and, more importantly, illegal.

Meet Helen. She is one of the vulnerable illegal aliens, those who live at the bottom of the bottom. Anyone willing to look can see them scrape by on the margins of society in all major cities. Illegals who manage to make a living often seem invisble. Helen isn’t, because she can't.

Next month, the Dutch parliament will vote on an amendment to the aliens act passed in 2000. A crucial element of that amendment is that people who stay in the Netherlands illegally for any length of time jeopardise their right to a residence permit.

The change has not caused commotion amongst the weakest illegals. They are not aware of it. However aid workers, scientists and some politicians are up in arms. They fear that the most fragile amongst the illegal aliens will be affected. These include victims of domestic violence and human trafficking afraid to report crimes committed against them; former asylum seekers who can't return home because their native country won't let them and children without a permit. The problems with illegal aliens are not solved this way, some say. In fact, the contrary will take place: the group of people without any prospects will grow. People like Helen.

Picking up the pieces

Estimates of the number of illegal aliens in the Netherlands range from 45,000 to 120,000. In Rotterdam alone, there are believed to be between 15,000 and 20,000. Accurate data are unavailable. Officially, illegal people don't exist.

National policies are aimed at discouraging illegality, but that is easier said than done. For this reason, the mayors of the four major cities, Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht, have written a pressing letter to justice minister, Ernst Hirsch Ballin, expressing their worries about the proposed amendment last month. They fear they will be the ones picking up the pieces when things take a wrong turn. And they are concerned that the number of illegal people will increase, at least the number of visible ones who can't take care of themselves.

Favor is one of those who would never make it on his own, said Theo Miltenburg, in a recent interview at his centre for undocumented immigrants in Rotterdam. Favor says he was born in Sudan, but immigration services believe he is really from Sierra Leone. They also dispute his mental disorder. He could be faking it in the hope of getting a residence permit.

Favor sat quietly crouched on the couch in Miltenburg's shelter; when spoken to he jumped up startled. Voices in his head were telling him he needed to get out of the centre and go outside to the bridge. Favor didn't know what they wanted him to do there, but he was scared. The voices upset him. Every now and then he got up to scream into the empty space behind the sofa: "Go away, go away!" He later explained, "they are standing there, laughing at me."

Caretaker Miltenburg knows those he tries to help do not always tell him the whole truth. Maybe Favor is really from Sierra Leone. But he doesn't doubt his mental illness. "He would be an absurdly good actor if this was fake," Miltenburg said.

Left by her mother at 15

He also helped Helen when she was out on the street, pregnant and refusing help. She crashed on the floor of a shelter for a while, until Miltenberg alerted the municipality to her case. National policy does not allow local authorities to help illegal aliens, but how could they leave a pregnant woman on the street? She was put up in an vacant apartment.

Helen appeared well-composed as she talked about her life in English. She was 15 when her mother left her in a children's home in Germany. Helen said she doesn't know why. But she remembers her mother never took care of her very long. She was too busy working.

She was illegal in Germany, which she had entered on a tourist visa, but she never got in trouble. The authorities allowed her to stay as long as she kept up the story that she was brought there by a stranger and had no family. She got a visa for a fixed time, she attended school and received welfare after she turned 18. She had a Polish boyfriend.

Things fell apart in the 1990s. Helen said her troubles began after she had a miscarriage. Then it went from bad to worse. She became afraid of the daylight, afraid of other people, afraid of the street. She had to get away from where she was and came to the Netherlands in 2000, on impulse, with one bag of clothes.

Released back onto the streets

Here she moved from city to city, fare-dodging on public transport. She survived on the street. "There are places in each city where you can stay and get food," she explained. She begged for money. "People in Maastricht and Utrecht give very little, those in Rotterdam are more generous, especially around Christmas. Most cities have a system where homeless people can make money collecting rubbish with a pricker, but you need a national insurance number for that. I don't have one."

She avoided shelters until it became unbearably cold on the streets. "There you are on a stretcher, between alcoholics and drug addicts. The smell! The snoring and the yelling. I couldn't deal with that."

She was arrested several times and attempts were made to deport her. "Ethiopia won't give the entry papers. I don't want to go. What would I do there. I haven't heared from my mother in 20 years. I don't know if she ever came looking for me, but I think about her a lot," she said.

After days, sometimes weeks, in prison, Helen was always released back onto the streets, where she conquered some of her own fears. "I was my own shrink. Psychiatrists confront their patients with their fear, I saw this on television. Someone with agoraphobia had to go to a square, holding the therapist's hand. I was afraid of light and the street, but I couldn't avoid those. I had to fight my fears. And one day, I remember, I was in Utrecht, the fear was gone."

Now she is about to become a mother. She didn't find out until she was three months pregnant and says she has no idea who the father is. She has often turned to the Missionaries of Charity in Rotterdam, but this time she didn't dare. "I was afraid they would take my baby away after it was born. I was confused."

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

My point is should this woman's pain be considered any less than the pain of the parents of the trafficked children in Haiti? If you think so then I'd love to know why. Human rights abuse victims living in so called "civilised " or developed countries often face more difficulty getting justice because the public in those countries try to obsolve themselves of any responsibility using comparisons of exstreme cases in foreign countires to minimise and humilitate the victim in a effort to avoid taking responsibility for human right abuse victims in their own communities. Many of these countries are the destination points for victims of human trafficing, be it babies for adoption or maids and factory workers for industry, on continual short term work permits with minimum wages and no benefits, or workers for the sex trade. 

Strawman

To minimise the exploitation of another human being is to condone that exploitation by default, two wrongs do not make a "right".

Nobody is doing that here.

My point was more that there is no need to compare Helen's situation to anyone else's, including Teh Gaye coming out of closet, to make a point about human and civil rights. In fact, your post above would do well in the current .nl thread, where colonialism --which is one of the main reasons why there are so many immigrants are in the .nl to begin with-- is being minimized.

My point is should this woman's pain be considered any less than the pain of the parents of the trafficked children in Haiti? If you think so then I'd love to know why.

Who said it shouldn't?? Just because I didn't agree with your hasty analogy? Come on, step up the game.

Pound Pup Legacy