With adopted Guatemalan girl finally home, 'This is where the new journey begins'

Date: 2009-03-13
Source: Star Telegram

With adopted Guatemalan girl finally home, 'This is where the new journey begins'
By ANNA M. TINSLEY 
atinsley@star-telegram.com

D/FW AIRPORT — At long last, Jacki Dudding was able to wrap her arms around both her daughters at the same time.

But only because she and her husband, Mike, were finally able to bring their 20-month-old adopted daughter, Sienna, home from Guatemala on Thursday.

After clearing customs, the Colleyville couple were greeted by about a dozen friends and relatives — and their 3-year-old daughter, Isabella, also adopted from Guatemala — in the international terminal.

Isabella ran to her mom, who — not letting go of Sienna — kneeled to hug her.

Finally home, finally holding both girls, Jacki closed her eyes and cried.

"It is unbelievable," she said, as Isabella reached out to touch Sienna’s hand. "It’s so surreal.

"This has been a long, long time coming."

Emotional journey

Jacki and Mike Dudding began this journey in February 2007, when they decided to adopt a second child from Guatemala.

They had adopted Isabella in 2005, bringing her home when she was 4 months old, and they hoped that the second adoption would go just as smoothly.

So they went back to the Gladney Center for Adoption in Fort Worth and were eventually matched with Sienna.

Then last March, Guatemalan officials froze pending cases to review facts and interview birth mothers because of concerns about fraud and illegal adoptions.

Their case was allowed to proceed only after a hold put on children at the private orphanage where Sienna lived — Semillas de Amor — was lifted by the government.

They visited Sienna several times in Guatemala, each time aching because they had to leave her behind. Mike went to Washington, D.C., to ask congressional and State Department adoption officials to help bring his daughter home.

And Jacki, with the help of Gladney, secured more than $16,000 in donations for the orphanage, which had fallen behind on bills and risked being closed.

"This has been such an emotional roller coaster," said Jett Hampton, Jacki’s sister. "We would think we were almost at the end of the line, then they changed the rules. We’re almost at the end again, and they lose a piece of paper. It kept going on and on."

One last trip

Jacki and Mike flew to Guatemala on March 2 even though they weren’t sure they would be able to return with Sierra.

"We went, thinking if we worked hard to influence people, we’d get to bring her home," Jacki said. "We were nauseated, nervous, just knowing we would get there and nothing would be ready."

But on Tuesday, the paperwork was ready and a Guatemalan judge signed it in front of them. They took a cab to the orphanage and picked up Sienna.

After so many problems, so many delays, they were afraid something would still go wrong.

"It was not until the plane was in the air did we feel it was real," Jacki said. "It’s just now sinking in. To have them both here, you can’t imagine what it’s like."

Mike smiled as he watched his wife hold both girls.

"It feels awesome to be home," he said.

'Gotcha’

March 12 will forever be Sienna’s "gotcha" day — the day her parents finally got her home — just like March 8 is Isabella’s.

These days are celebrated with just as much, if not more, enthusiasm as birthdays, the Duddings say.

Isabella, who ate M&Ms while waiting for her family, enthusiastically showed off her sister to well-wishers.

"That’s my baby," she told some people. "That’s my baby sister," she told others.

She gave Sienna a stuffed bunny and told her that she’ll show her how to pick flowers, hide Easter eggs, even pet puppies.

Onlookers smiled as the two girls sat together in their mother’s lap.

"This has been an amazingly long, complicated, heartbreaking journey," said Jennifer Lanter, the public information officer for Gladney. "But this is where the new journey begins."
ANNA M. TINSLEY, 817-390-7610

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Let's do the math behind a Gotcha Day

Ah..... the language of cash, how loud it speaks in Adoptionland.  Ain't it amazing how enough of it will help pave the way to a smooth landing....

Jacki and Mike Dudding began this journey in February 2007, when they decided to adopt a second child from Guatemala.

They had adopted Isabella in 2005, bringing her home when she was 4 months old, and they hoped that the second adoption would go just as smoothly.

So they went back to the Gladney Center for Adoption in Fort Worth and were eventually matched with Sienna.

Then last March, Guatemalan officials froze pending cases to review facts and interview birth mothers because of concerns about fraud and illegal adoptions.

Their case was allowed to proceed only after a hold put on children at the private orphanage where Sienna lived — Semillas de Amor — was lifted by the government.

They visited Sienna several times in Guatemala, each time aching because they had to leave her behind. Mike went to Washington, D.C., to ask congressional and State Department adoption officials to help bring his daughter home.

And Jacki, with the help of Gladney, secured more than $16,000 in donations for the orphanage, which had fallen behind on bills and risked being closed.

"This has been such an emotional roller coaster," said Jett Hampton, Jacki’s sister. "We would think we were almost at the end of the line, then they changed the rules. We’re almost at the end again, and they lose a piece of paper. It kept going on and on."

One last trip

Jacki and Mike flew to Guatemala on March 2 even though they weren’t sure they would be able to return with Sierra.

"We went, thinking if we worked hard to influence people, we’d get to bring her home," Jacki said. "We were nauseated, nervous, just knowing we would get there and nothing would be ready."

But on Tuesday, the paperwork was ready and a Guatemalan judge signed it in front of them. They took a cab to the orphanage and picked up Sienna.

After so many problems, so many delays, they were afraid something would still go wrong.

"It was not until the plane was in the air did we feel it was real," Jacki said. "It’s just now sinking in. To have them both here, you can’t imagine what it’s like."

Pay the required "donation" fee, and the prefered age-group can be obtained, "legally".

Yea.... like a little fudging of records, and readjusting of some dates, names and numbers, is NEVER done in a so-called "legal" adoption, facilitated by a big-name American adoption agency.

<rolling eyes like I'm about to have a stroke>

Do Americans NOT see how orphanages (orphanage directors and judges, for that matter) make-out on this child-trade deal?  The only thing missing is the staff T-shirt that reads, in English, "Have cash, can carry"

<looking for my operation air-lift barf-bag>

 

"Gotcha Day"...got what?

A couple of points here:

1. Karen Moline wrote, "I find the use of "gotcha" to describe the act of adoption both astonishing and offensive. Aside from being parent-centered ("C'mere, little orphan, I gotcha now!") it smacks of acquiring a possession, not welcoming a new person into your life.'[9]

Need I say more?

2. The article states that the child came from the orphanage in Guatemala..."Semillas de Amor"/Seeds of Love. Um...weren't they raided by the National Police and authorities? I think so, read the archives people. So it seems that coersion, faked documents and a whole bunch of other ditties...is ok just as long a you "gotcha" kid. How sad for all involved.

3. Most APs don't see how those that profit off the misery and coersion of mothers in foreign countries...live. In palatial homes, with many staff and beach homes and also...homes in the US. There is a high price to pay for ICA, sadly it is the children and biomothers that suffer the most. If such loving and caring folks (APs) would have only donated a mere portion of what they paid for the adoption to services for women and children in-country, then families could stay families together...maybe ICA would not exist so that new orphans would not be created.

Aww come-on....

don't be such a kill-joy, of course there are great things about ICA... just ask people like Adam Perksman, Top DiFlipeto, and those Harvard edjamacators who get paid to pitch and promote their pro-adoption stories.

Why each time a sale donation is made, I can see a new Adoption Angel sprout some wings!  [Hey, who cares if leaders in Adoptionland love a good incestuous relationship, it's all happy-n-good as long as those profiting don't get hurt.]

Getting the desired outcome

Now that I got some of my sarcasm out in my other reply, I'd like to address an important point made:

Most APs don't see how those that profit off the misery and coersion of mothers in foreign countries...live. In palatial homes, with many staff and beach homes and also...homes in the US. There is a high price to pay for ICA, sadly it is the children and biomothers that suffer the most. If such loving and caring folks (APs) would have only donated a mere portion of what they paid for the adoption to services for women and children in-country, then families could stay families together...maybe ICA would not exist so that new orphans would not be created.

Adoptionland has grown so huge, thanks to infertility, it's almost impossible to help the poor without wanting something (like an infant) in return.

If we take the time to look at popular PAP demand [as encouraged by infertile Amothers/adoption facilitators like Mardie Caldwell ], add the newer ("more ethical"?) options, like surrogacy and embryo donation/transfer, and add all three to the services made possible through a private adoption agency, the point becomes very clear -- most seeking babies through adoption could not give a rat's ass about the problems impoverished women/mothers have to face.

This is why so many angry adoptees say over and over and over again, there is NO altruism in adoption.  None.   Not even from those who claim to be God-loving/fearing Christians.

About Embryo Adoption & Donation

Adoption is an act of love, fulfilled by the courage of couples who want to share their love with children. Embryo adoption is life-giving love in action in an age of technology.

Embryo donation and adoption is a new way to adopt, a new adoption alternative! Rather than adopting a child who has already emerged from her mother's womb, embryo adoption allows the adopting family to begin the adoption journey with pregnancy and childbirth.

Modern medical science has developed procedures to assist people who are having difficulty achieving a successful pregnancy. One of the most popular methods is in vitro fertilization (IVF). Frequently there are more embryos created during an IVF treatment than are actually used, thus embryos remain.

Nearly 70% of adults in the United States would choose donation to another couple for family building if they had unused frozen embryos. (July 2009 General Public Survey, I/H/R Research Group for NCA)

These embryos are frozen and are a source of hope for others who want to add children to their family. There are over 500,000 of these healthy, viable embryos in the United States some of them are being donated to families like yours! You will find that embryo adoption is an affordable way to adopt compared to domestic or international adoption. You may even determine that using donated embryos is a good IVF alternative for you, rather than creating more embryos or purchasing expensive donor eggs to create embryos.

[From:  http://www.embryoadoption.org/ -- where the bottom disclaimer reads: "This website is maintained by NIGHTLIGHT® CHRISTIAN ADOPTIONS with support from a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services #6EAAPA081009-03-01. Its contents are solely the responsibility of its authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Department." ]  Go take a look-see at the impressive collection of  association"seal of approval" tags added to the bottom of the Nightlight Homepage....

Playing God, and earning a salary through family-making services takes on a whole new twist if it requires a cheap surrogate gestational carrier, found and kept in places like Guatemala and India, doesn't it?

That's not the worst -- check-out "Orphan Care", as the role of a participating (richly funded) orphanage is KEY to future (adoption) success:

Orphan Care

Nightlight Christian Adoptions aggressively seeks opportunities to help orphans in need, whether or not they will ever have the opportunity to be adopted. Nightlight provides humanitarian aid for orphans in Cambodia and Africa, in addition to running programs that empower you to connect personally with orphans in need of help.

  • Orphan Care Summer Tours
    Every year Nightlight brings children to Southern California from orphanages overseas. In 2010 we brought children from Russia and Taiwan. (read more)
     
  • Mama & Papa Bears: Supporting Adoption of Special Needs Children
    This program brings together families interested in special needs adoption with families that have already completed a special needs adoption. (read more)
     
  • Cambodian Orphanage Support
    Nightlight makes regular donations to a private orphanage near Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The orphanage is directed and staffed by Cambodians. (read more)
     
  • Tender Hearts Baby's Home in Uganda
    Nightlight has formed a partnership with a registered non-governmental organization, Heart of a Child Uganda, to establish a new orphanage in Kampala, Uganda, Tender Hearts Baby's Home. This orphanage, in conjunction with a pro-life ministry which offers women alternatives to abortion, will primarily serve babies and toddlers. (read more)

[From:  http://www.nightlight.org/adoption-services/orphan-care/default.aspx ]

And the role of a good Maternity Home and adoption recruiters is.....?

All very happy to serve the desperate, and infertile, thank you.

Pound Pup Legacy