Guatemala: the millionaire "business" of adoptions

Date: 2008-06-15

GUATEMALA .- The titanic struggle launched by four Guatemalan women whose daughters were stolen two years ago, supposedly to be given up for adoption abroad, has highlighted the anomalies that occur in networks involved in processing the adoption of children, a business that generates revenues of over $ 150 million a year.

 Women, who for a week staged a hunger strike in front of the National Palace of Culture in the historic center of Guatemala City, with the support of the Survivors Association, an organization that advises and assist women victims of violence, managed to paralyze processes 2,300 cases that the Attorney General's Office (PGN) was about to adopt.

"We will review the processes one by one, to determine whether children who were given up for adoption are in fact children of mothers who appear in documents managed by lawyers," the Attorney General, Baudilio Portillo.

The official agreed to journalists that the pressure of the mothers on hunger strike, and the suggestions of the Commission on Children and Families of Parliament and the newly created National Council for Adoptions (CNA) reported that these anomalies procedures, forcing the institution to suspend the proceedings.

For years, in the absence of a specific law to regulate adoptions, PGN approved the thousands of processes that were handled by private lawyers, through notarial, which were riddled with irregularities and concerns regarding the true origin of the children.

This practice came to an end last December, when the Guatemalan Congress, pressured by the Hague Conference on Private International Law, passed the Adoption Act created the National Council for Adoption, an intergovernmental body that is responsible for ensuring the legality of adoptions.

Governed under the old system, the PGN in 2006 authorized a total of 4837 adoptions, a 10 percent increase over 2005, while last year the amount of Guatemalan children was given up for adoption in 5110, 97 percent of whom was adopted by U.S. families.

These figures placed Guatemala as the second largest "exporter" of children in the world, surpassed only by China and whose population surpasses this Central American country.

Although the new law took effect in January, still pending the adoption process begins with about 2,300 the previous procedure, in which the authorities suspect that several of the children may have been stolen from their biological mothers to be given up for adoption in abroad.

Although it has not yet completed the review of all cases, authorities have already found several anomalies.  Elizabeth de Larios, president of the National Council for Adoption, told the press that "at least twenty cases" has been discovered that lawyers who handle adoptions filed false documents "as the identity card of the alleged biological mothers as well as items birth of babies. "

They have also found that "the directions set by the lawyers on the places where children are allegedly are false" and even "have come to alter the photographs of children that would be given up for adoption, to make the authorities believe it is the babies whose procedures have been approved, when in fact they are other children who were returned to their adoptive parents. "

 "Here, responsibilities will be deducted against you are responsible," said Larios.

Two of the women who initiated the complaint, believed to have found among these 2300 children, their daughters that they were stolen in 2006 while awaiting a DNA test that will be performed on them for the girls - scientifically determine whether it is actually small.

Both mother, Ana Escobar, Olga Lopez, to hold his alleged daughter, Esther, and Arlene, respectively, after the PNG delivered to a children's court, after receiving the lawyers who handled their adoptions.

Both mothers have clung to these small ones and in tears waiting for the end of the drama started when, by force, unknown persons were snatched from their arms.

Olga's daughter was stolen on September 27, 2006 and Anne on March 26 of that year, with the intention of and placed for adoption through illegal channels.

The two women, along with Loyda Rodriguez and Raquel Par , who also stole his daughters in 2006, held a hunger strike for a week to claim their small appearance.

 "We are satisfied with the results of the hunger strike, because we managed to force the system to investigate the whereabouts of the stolen four girls," said Norma Cruz, director of the Survivor Foundation.

Cruz, however, is partial because it ensures that "there are still hundreds of cases in which surely can not do anything, because children who were stolen from their mothers have already been given up for adoption abroad and their new parents, "despite the inhumane and illegal origin" of the small "will be unwilling to cooperate."

The Human Rights Ombudsman (PDH) estimates that about 203 children were stolen last year by the mafia in order to adopt them abroad illegally, while the Guatemalan Attorney says that the figure may be higher, but has no data accurate because not all mothers who are victims file complaints for fear of reprisals.

Ninth Guevara, director of the office for the protection of children and adolescents of the PDH, recently announced that his institution will initiate criminal proceedings against those involved in at least 80 cases of adoption, in which "found evidence" that may have been stolen from their parents.
 
On April 29, during a formal visit to Washington (USA), Guatemalan President Alvaro Colom, told congressional leaders that the U.S. government has taken steps to ensure that the system of child adoption is "legal and fair."

However, solving this problem is much more complex because the "market" adoptions in Guatemala is run by organized gangs that involve lawyers, doctors, midwives and nurses, and according to reports from local organizations that monitor the rights of children, "easily buy impunity in state institutions," to distribute large sums of money between judges and officials.

In the last six months have been located by the security forces about five casa cunas (crib houses) operating illegally, which have found more than a hundred children waiting to be given up for adoption. In one of these places was captured Rosalina Rivera, Rivera's sister Gudy member of the opposition Partido Patriota, who ironically chairs the legislative chamber of Children and Families.

The woman regained his freedom one day after his arrest, after payment of a bond, although they did not show the origin of the 14 infants who had under his care, while the legislature is separated to ensure that it has nothing to do to activities that involved her sister, who is not from nothing three years ago. "

A study last year by specialized technicians from the Ministry of Social Welfare of the Presidency, the Myrna Mack Foundation, the Human Rights Office of the Archbishop and the Survivor Foundation, called "Adoptions in Guatemala: protection or market?", Describes how active networks involved in processing the adoption of Guatemalan children.
 
The "business" of adoptions, said the study, going for crimes ranging from falsifying documents and corruption of public officials, to theft and sale of babies, and generates an "economic crime".

The report denounces the existence of "an economic crime directly related to adoptions, involving a number of people and businesses, without the competent institutions of the State against them."

That situation, denouncing the report "suggests that members of the judiciary are involved in networks of adoptions," to facilitate the procedures illegal.The leaders of the economics of crime have created mechanisms to ensure the collection of babies and then coordinate the process of being adopted before the PGN and ensure economic benefits for all members of the network of adoptions.

The study identified dozens of lawyers, doctors, midwives, nurses, social workers, owners of hotels, translators, civil registrars and other government officials as members of these networks.

 To meet the demand of children for adoption, the networks involved in this business, the report says, have fallen into the theft of babies who were snatched from the arms of their mothers, mostly young women, poor and unprotected.

  Each adoption is oscillating between 13,000 and $ 40,000 (8,783 and 27,027 euros), 80 per cent of these amounts is left to the lawyers who handled, and the rest is divided among the doctors who follow the birth and newborn born, and other persons performing various functions within these networks.

-- "We will review the processes one by one, to determine whether children who were given up for adoption are in fact children of mothers who appear in documents managed by lawyers," the Attorney General, Baudilio Portillo .

-- The "business" of adoptions, said the study, going for crimes ranging from falsifying documents and corruption of public officials, to theft and sale of babies, and generates an "economic crime".

-- Each adoption is oscillating between 13,000 and $ 40,000 (8,783 and 27,027 euros), 80 per cent of these amounts is left to the lawyers who handled, and the rest is divided among the doctors who follow the birth and newborns, as well as all other persons performing various functions within these networks.



Guatemala: el millonario "negocio" de las adopciones

GUATEMALA.- La titánica lucha iniciada por cuatro mujeres guatemaltecas, cuyas hijas les fueron robadas hace dos años, supuestamente para ser dadas en adopción en el extranjero, ha puesto en evidencia las anomalías en que incurren las redes dedicadas a tramitar la adopción de niños, un "negocio" que genera ingresos por más de 150 millones de dólares al año.

Las mujeres, que durante una semana realizaron una huelga de hambre frente al Palacio Nacional de la Cultura, en el centro histórico de la capital guatemalteca, con el apoyo de la Asociación Sobrevivientes, una organización que asisten y asesora mujeres víctimas de violencia, lograron paralizar los procesos de 2.300 casos que la Procuraduría General de la Nación (PGN) estaba a punto de aprobar.

"Vamos a revisar uno a uno los procesos, para determinar si los niños que serían dados en adopción son en realidad hijos de las madres que aparecen en los documentos gestionados por los abogados", explicó el procurador General de la Nación, Baudilio Portillo.

El funcionario aceptó ante los periodistas que la presión de las madres en huelga de hambre, y las sugerencias de la Comisión de la Niñez y la Familia del Parlamento y del recién creado Consejo Nacional de Adopciones (CNA), que han denunciado posibles anomalías en esos trámites, forzaron a la institución a suspender los procesos.

Durante años, ante la falta de una ley específica que regulara las adopciones, la PGN aprobó miles de procesos que eran tramitadas por abogados particulares, por la vía notarial, los cuales estuvieron plagados de irregularidades y dudas con respecto al verdadero origen de los menores.

Esta práctica llegó a su fin en diciembre pasado, cuando el Congreso guatemalteco, presionado por la Conferencia de La Haya en Derecho Internacional Privado, aprobó la Ley de Adopciones, la creó el Consejo Nacional de Adopciones, una instancia intergubernamental que será la encargada de garantizar la legalidad de las adopciones.

Regidos bajo el sistema anterior, la PGN autorizó en 2006 un total de 4.837 adopciones, un 10 por ciento más que en 2005, mientras que el año pasado la suma de menores guatemaltecos dados en adopción fue de 5.110, el 97 por cientos de los cuales fue adoptado por familias estadounidenses.

Esas cifras colocan a Guatemala como el segundo país "exportador" de niños en el mundo, sólo superado por China cuyo nivel demográfico supera con creces a este país centroamericano.

Aunque la nueva ley cobró vigencia en enero pasado, aún estaban pendientes de aprobarse unos 2.300 procesos iniciados con el procedimiento anterior, en los que las autoridades sospechan que varios de los niños pueden haber sido robados a sus madres biológicas para ser dados en adopción en el extranjero.

Pese a que aún no ha concluido la revisión de todos los casos, las autoridades han hallado ya varias anomalías. Elizabeth de Larios, presidenta del Consejo Nacional de Adopciones, dijo a la prensa que "al menos en veinte casos" se ha descubierto que los abogados que tramitan las adopciones presentaron documentos falsos "como cédulas de vecindad de las supuestas madres biológicas, así como partidas de nacimiento de los bebés".

También han detectado que "las direcciones consignadas por los abogados sobre los lugares en donde supuestamente se encuentran los niños, son falsas" y incluso, "han llegado a alterar las fotografías de los niños que serían dados en adopción, para hacer creer a las autoridades que se trata de los bebés cuyos trámites han sido aprobados, cuando en realidad son otros los niños que serían entregados a sus padres adoptivos".

"En estos casos se deducirán responsabilidades en contra de quieres resulten responsables", indicó De Larios.

Dos de las mujeres que iniciaron la denuncia, creen haber encontrado entre estos 2.300 niños, a sus hijas que les fueron robadas en 2006, y están a la espera de que una prueba de ADN -que les será practicadas a ellas a las niñas- para determinar científicamente si en realidad se trata de sus pequeñas.

Olga Angelica Lopez Lopez de 32 años de edad llora en el hogar de la Funadacion Sobrevivientes mientras declara a la prensa como fue el robo de su hija Arlene Escarleth Lopez Lopez. Olga Lopez paso junto a cuatro madres en una huelga de hambre al inicio de este mes para pedir al gobierno de Guatemala ayuda para encontrar a sus hija.
Las dos madres, Ana Escobar y Olga López, tienen en su poder a sus presuntas hijas, Esther y Arlene, respectivamente, luego de que la PNG las entregó a un tribunal de la niñez, tras recibirlas de los abogados que tramitaban sus adopciones.

Ambas madres se han aferrado a estas pequeñas y entre lágrimas esperan el fin del drama iniciado cuando, por la fuerza, personas desconocidas se las arrebataron de sus brazos.
La hija de Olga fue robada el 27 de septiembre de 2006 y la de Ana el 26 de marzo del mismo año, con la intención de ofrecerlas en adopciones a través de canales ilegales.

Las dos mujeres, junto a Loyda Rodríguez y Raquel Par, a quienes también les robaron sus hijas en 2006, mantuvieron una huelga de hambre de una semana para reclamar la aparición de sus pequeñas.

"Nos sentimos satisfechas por los resultados de la huelga de hambre, porque logramos forzar al sistema a que investigara el paradero de las cuatro niñas robadas", expresó Norma Cruz, directora de la Fundación Sobrevivientes.

La alegría de Cruz, sin embargo, es parcial, ya que asegura que "aún hay cientos de casos en los que seguramente no se podrá hacer nada, porque los niños que fueron robados a sus madres ya han sido dados en adopción en el extranjero", y sus nuevos padres, "a pesar del origen ilegal e inhumano" de los pequeños "no estarán dispuestos a colaborar".

La Procuraduría de Derechos Humanos (PDH) calcula que unos 203 niños fueron robados el año pasado por las mafias para darlos en adopción de manera ilegal en el extranjero, mientras que la Fiscalía guatemalteca asegura que la cifra puede ser superior, pero lamenta no tener datos exactos porque no todas las madres que son víctimas presentan sus denuncias por temor a represalias.

Nineth Guevara, directora de la oficina de protección de la niñez y la adolescencia de la PDH, anunció recientemente que esa institución iniciará proceso penal en contra de las personas involucradas en al menos 80 expedientes de adopción, en los que "se han encontrado indicios" de que pudieron haber sido robados a sus progenitoras.

Ana escobar de 26 años muestra la fotografia de su hija Ester Escobar cuando tenia 6 meses de edad. A escobar le fue robada su hija el 26 de marzo del 2006 cuando dos hombre y dos mujeres entraron a una zapateria donde ella se encontraba trabajando y ellos asaltaron el lugar para gopearla , encerarla y robar a la niña.
El pasado 29 de abril, durante una visita oficial realizada a Washington (EEUU), el presidente guatemalteco Álvaro Colom, aseguró a líderes del Congreso estadounidense que su Gobierno ha tomado medidas para que el sistema de adopción de menores sea "legal y justo".

Sin embargo, la solución de este problema es mucho más complejo debido a que el "mercado" de adopciones en Guatemala es dirigido por mafias organizadas que involucran a abogados, médicos, comadronas y niñeras, y que según denuncias de organizaciones locales que velan por los derechos de la niñez, "con facilidad compran impunidad en las instituciones del Estado", al repartir fuertes sumas de dinero entre jueces y funcionarios.

En los últimos seis meses han sido localizadas por las fuerzas de seguridad unas cinco casas-cunas que funcionan de forma clandestina, en las que han hallado a más de un centenar de niños en espera de ser dados en adopción. En uno de estos lugares fue capturada Rosalina Rivera, hermana del diputado Gudy Rivera, del opositor Partido Patriota, quien paradójicamente preside la sala legislativa del Menor y la Familia.

La mujer recobró su libertad un día después de su detención, tras el pago de una fianza, a pesar de que no demostró el origen de los 14 bebés que tenia bajo su cuidado, mientras que el legislador se desligó al asegurar que nada tiene que ver con las actividades a las que se dedica su hermana, "de quien no se nada desde hace tres años".

Un estudio elaborado el año pasado por técnicos especializados de la Secretaría de Bienestar Social de la Presidencia, la Fundación Myrna Mack, la Oficina de Derechos Humanos del Arzobispado y la Fundación Sobrevivientes, denominado "Adopciones en Guatemala: ¿protección o mercado?", describe la forma en que actúan las redes dedicadas a tramitar la adopción de niños guatemaltecos.

El "negocio" de las adopciones, señala el estudio, pasa por delitos que van desde la falsificación de documentos y corrupción de funcionarios públicos, hasta robo y compra-venta de bebés, y genera una "economía del delito".

Un niño guatemalteco del Hogar Divina Trinidad parte de los 53 niños que permencen en dicho hogar ubicado a 20 kilometros al este de la capital.
El informe denuncia la existencia de "una economía del delito relacionado directamente con las adopciones, que involucra a un sin fin de personas y negocios, sin que las instituciones del Estado competentes accionen contra éstas".

Esa situación, denuncia el informe, "hace suponer que operadores de justicia están involucrados en las redes de adopciones", para facilitar los procedimientos ilegales. Los líderes de la economía del delito han creado mecanismos para asegurar la captación de bebés para luego coordinar su trámite de adopción ante la PGN y garantizar beneficios económicos para todos los integrantes de la red de adopciones".

El estudio identificó a decenas de abogados, médicos, comadronas, enfermeras, trabajadoras sociales, propietarios de hoteles, traductores, registradores civiles y otros funcionarios públicos como integrantes de esas redes.

Para satisfacer la demanda de niños para la adopción, las redes dedicadas a este negocio, según el informe, han caído en el robo de bebés que les son arrebatados de los brazos de sus madres, en su mayoría, mujeres jóvenes, pobres y desprotegidas.

Cada adopción estaría oscilando entre los 13.000 y 40.000 dólares (8.783 y 27.027 euros), el 80 por ciento de esas sumas queda en manos de los cuales abogados que las tramitan, y el resto es repartido entre los médicos que atienen los partos y a los recién nacidos, así como el resto de personas que cumplen diversas funciones dentro de estas redes.

-- "Vamos a revisar uno a uno los procesos, para determinar si los niños que serían dados en adopción son en realidad hijos de las madres que aparecen en los documentos gestionados por los abogados", explicó el procurador General de la Nación, Baudilio Portillo.

-- El "negocio" de las adopciones, señala el estudio, pasa por delitos que van desde la falsificación de documentos y corrupción de funcionarios públicos, hasta robo y compra-venta de bebés, y genera una "economía del delito".

-- Cada adopción estaría oscilando entre los 13.000 y 40.000 dólares (8.783 y 27.027 euros), el 80 por ciento de esas sumas queda en manos de los cuales abogados que las tramitan, y el resto es repartido entre los médicos que atienen los partos y a los recién nacidos, así como el resto de personas que cumplen diversas funciones dentro de estas redes.

0

Pound Pup Legacy