Russia bans adoptions international organizations

Date: 2008-07-11
Source: top.rbc.ru

Russia bans adoptions international organizations

The Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation has decided to revoke the permits for work on adoption of Russian children from several international organizations. The decision was taken on July 11, 2008 at a meeting of the interdepartmental commission on adoptions, which was held under the chairmanship of Minister of Education and Science Andrei Fursenko.

The reason for these decisions were the outcome of inspections and violations of established facts legislation of the Russian Federation.

Among the agencies that would be prohibited from working in the Russian Federation, the Russian representative office is a non-profit corporation European Adoption Consultants, Inc. It violated the requirement of Russian legislation, did not immediately inform the Russian side about the facts surrounding the death on July 8, 2008 of Dmitry Yakovlev, adopted by American family, said the report ministry.

However Minobrnauki not led the list or number of organizations whose activities can be suspended.

According to the Ministry of Russian Federation, each year in Russia detected about 125 thousand orphans and children left without parental custody. The number of children referred to family forms of upbringing, in 2007 compared to 2006, increased by 6.4% (119.7 thousand and 113 thousand respectively) against the backdrop of the annual reduction in the number of child population by 3%. Under the trusteeship (guardianship) was transferred to 83.7 thousand children (72%), while in foster families - 18.9 thousand (16%). Meanwhile, in 2006 was lifted more than 1 thousand the outcome of the trusteeship, and more than 80 guardians were brought to criminal responsibility. In 2006, Russia has been adopted in 14 thousand 431 children, of which 7 thousand 742 foreign children adopted by citizens. At adoptions in 2007 was transferred to 13.2 thousand orphans (11%), of which 8.9 thousand children were adopted in Russia and 4.3 thousand families - Foreign. At the Moscow and Moscow region accounted for more than 10% of the national number of adoptions by foreigners.

In Moscow, almost half the children are adopted by foreign nationals. At the end of 2006 most adoptions were U.S. nationals (3 thousand 468 children), Spaniards adopted 1 thousand 294, Italians, the French - 408 children.

However, in November 2007 Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador of USA in Russia William Joseph Burns said in an interview with RBC that the total number of Russian children who are adopted by American families, rather insignificant - it is less than 1% of all Russian orphans. "American families that wish to adopt a Russian child, exposed to the same stringent selection process and are regarded by the same criteria as if they wished to adopt an American child in cases where American families adopted Russian children, they are doing everything to give them every opportunity for growth and development "- said the diplomat. "After the adoption occurs, the U.S. federal government, as the state government, in which the family resides, are doing everything to regularly monitor the welfare of an adopted child," - assured the ambassador.

Berns did not deny that there are cases of "appalling abuses". According to him, the U.S. embassy in the Russian Federation is working with the Russian government to reduce the number of problems associated with adoption.

Over the past three years has already registered five deaths in the United States adopted Russian children. In this regard, in November 2006 the Russian government approved the rules on foreign adoptions of children organizations in Russia. For work related to the transfer of children in foster families, foreign public organizations need permission to open a representation. Foreign non-profit organization must notify the Federal Registration Service, and then obtain permission from the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation. In doing so, the permission granted to non-profit organizations that on the territory of his state adoptions of children engaged in at least 5 years. Among the documents that are required to obtain permission letter should be the competent authority of the State, which issues licenses for adoption activities in its territory. The grounds for refusal of permission can serve as providing false information on the work of adverse socio-economic or ecological situation in the State whose nationals intend to adopt Russian children, as well as insufficient legal protection of foster children in the State's territory. The license (permit) on the activity of foreign nonprofit organizations issued for a period of not less than 5 years, while before such organizations should be re-annually.

Ministry proposes, in addition to existing measures to establish compulsory psychological examination and a special training programme to receive the child in foster family. In addition to adopt a law banning foreigners to adopt Russian children directly, without the assistance of accredited adoption agencies.

Currently, up to 80% of international adoptions done through accredited organizations, the rest - independent adoptions. At the end of December 2006, Russia worked in 20 foreign missions accredited to adoption (of which 14 represented the United States, 3 - Italy, 2 - Canada, and one - Spain).

In 2007, to documents filed registration for the extension of 76 agencies. If before a licence for the operation of the Russian adoption agencies issued by the Ministry of Education and Science, today their statements further discussed in the Ministries of Home Affairs, Justice, Foreign Affairs and MHSD.

[This is an automatic translation from the orginal Russian article performed by Google Translate, followed by the orginal text in Russian]

Россия запретит усыновление международным организациям

Министерство образования и науки РФ приняло решение об отзыве разрешений на деятельность по усыновлению российских детей у нескольких международных организаций. Соответствующее решение было принято 11 июля 2008г. на заседании межведомственной комиссии по вопросам усыновления, которое состоялось под председательством министра образования и науки Андрея Фурсенко.

Основанием для такого решения стали итоги проведенных проверок и установленных фактов нарушений законодательства РФ.

В числе агентств, которым будет запрещено работать на территории РФ, значится российское представительство некоммерческой корпорации European Adoption Consultants, Inc. Оно нарушило требование российского законодательства, не проинформировав незамедлительно российскую сторону о факте гибели 8 июля 2008г. усыновленного американской семьей Дмитрия Яковлева, говорится в сообщении министерства.

Однако Минобрнауки не привело список или число организаций, деятельность которых может быть приостановлена.

По данным Минобрнауки РФ, каждый год в России выявляется около 125 тыс. сирот и детей, оставшихся без попечительства родителей. Количество детей, переданных на семейные формы воспитания, в 2007г. по сравнению с 2006г. возросло на 6,4% (119,7 тыс. и 113 тыс. соответственно) на фоне ежегодного сокращения численности детского населения страны на 3%. Под опеку (попечительство) было передано 83,7 тыс. детей (72%), а в приемные семьи - 18,9 тыс. (16%). Между тем, в 2006г. было отменено более 1 тыс. решений об опеке, а более 80 опекунов были привлечены к уголовной ответственности. В 2006г. в России было усыновлено 14 тыс. 431 детей, из них 7 тыс. 742 ребенка усыновили иностранные граждане. На усыновление в 2007г. было передано 13,2 тыс. сирот (11%), из них 8,9 тыс. детей были приняты в российские семьи и 4,3 тыс. - иностранные. При этом на Москву и Московскую область приходится более 10% от общероссийского числа усыновлений иностранцами.

В Москве почти половина детей усыновляется иностранными гражданами. По итогам 2006г. больше всего усыновлений пришлось на граждан США (3 тыс. 468 детей), испанцы усыновили 1 тыс. 294, итальянцы - 704, французы - 408 детей.

Однако в ноябре 2007г. чрезвычайный и полномочный посол США в РФ Уильям Джозеф Бернс сообщил в интервью РБК, что общее количество российских детей, которые усыновляются американскими семьями, довольно незначительно - оно составляет менее 1% всех российских сирот. "Американские семьи, которые изъявляют желание усыновить российского ребенка, подвергаются таким же строгим процессам отбора и рассматриваются по тем же критериям, как если бы они изъявили желание усыновить американского ребенка; в тех случаях, когда американские семьи усыновляют российских детей, они делают все, чтобы предоставить им все возможности для роста и развития", - сказал дипломат. "После того, как усыновление происходит, американское федеральное правительство, как и правительство штата, в котором проживает эта семья, делают все для того, чтобы регулярно следить за благополучием усыновленного ребенка", - заверил посол.

У.Дж.Бернс не стал отрицать, что имеются случаи "ужасных злоупотреблений". По его словам, посольство США в РФ работает совместно с российским правительством над уменьшением количество проблем, связанных с усыновлением.

За последние три года уже зарегистрировано пять случаев гибели усыновленных в США российских детей. В связи с этим в ноябре 2006г. правительство РФ утвердило правила работы иностранных организаций по усыновлению детей в России. Для работы, связанной с передачей детей в приемные семьи, иностранным государственным организациям требуется разрешение на открытие представительства. Иностранная некоммерческая организация должна уведомить Федеральную регистрационную службу, а затем получить разрешение в Министерстве образования и науки РФ. При этом разрешения выдаются некоммерческим организациям, которые на территории своего государства занимаются усыновлением детей не менее 5 лет. Среди документов, которые требуются для получения разрешения, должно быть рекомендательное письмо компетентного органа того государства, которое выдало лицензию на деятельность по усыновлению на своей территории. Основанием для отказа в выдаче разрешений может служить предоставление недостоверных сведений о работе, неблагоприятная социально-экономическая или экологическая обстановка в государстве, граждане которого намерены усыновить российских детей, а также недостаточная законодательная защищенность приемных детей на территории этого государства. Лицензия (разрешение) на осуществление деятельности иностранным некоммерческим организациям выдается на срок не менее 5 лет, в то время как раньше такие организации должны были проходить перерегистрацию ежегодно.

Минобрнауки предлагает в дополнение к имеющимся мерам установить обязательность прохождения психологического обследования и специальной программы подготовки к приему ребенка на воспитание в семью. Помимо этого предполагается принять закон, запрещающий иностранцам усыновлять российских детей напрямую, без помощи аккредитованных агентств по усыновлению.

В настоящее время до 80% международных усыновлений производится через аккредитованные организации, остальные - независимые усыновления. По данным на конец декабря 2006г., в России работали 20 аккредитованных иностранных представительств по усыновлению/удочерению (из них 14 представляли США, 3 - Италию, 2 - Канаду и одно - Испанию).

В 2007г. на документы на продление регистрации подали 76 агентств. Если раньше лицензии на деятельность российским агентствам по усыновлению выдавало Министерство образования и науки, то сегодня их заявления дополнительно рассматриваются в министерствах внутренних дел, юстиции, иностранных дел и Минздравсоцразвития.

0

"Ambassador of USA in Russia

"Ambassador of USA in Russia William Joseph Burns said in an interview with RBC that the total number of Russian children who are adopted by American families, rather insignificant - it is less than 1% of all Russian orphans. "American families that wish to adopt a Russian child, exposed to the same stringent selection process and are regarded by the same criteria as if they wished to adopt an American child in cases where American families adopted Russian children, they are doing everything to give them every opportunity for growth and development "- said the diplomat. "After the adoption occurs, the U.S. federal government, as the state government, in which the family resides, are doing everything to regularly monitor the welfare of an adopted child," - assured the ambassador.

Berns did not deny that there are cases of "appalling abuses". According to him, the U.S. embassy in the Russian Federation is working with the Russian government to reduce the number of problems associated with adoption."

What is the federal government doing to ensure regular monitoring of the adopted child is being maintained?

Absolutely nothing!!!

What is the federal government doing to ensure regular monitoring of the adopted child is being maintained?

I guess something was lost in translation here. The ambassador probably said something to the extent that: "After the adoption occurs, the U.S. federal government, and the government of the state in which the family resides, are doing everything within their power to regularly monitor the welfare of an adopted child".

This would be the diplomatic answer to give, since neither the U.S. federal government nor any state government has the ability to regularly monitor the welfare of an adopted child.

Once an adoption is finalized, adoptive parents receive parental rights over the child they adopted and with that, every form of monitoring becomes an invasion of privacy. This is one of the fundamental problems with adoption, not only in the U.S., but in all receiving countries. Until the finalization of the adoption, authorities have a stake in the well being of the child, as soon as the adoption is finalized, all forms of monitoring become voluntary.

Adoption is a really drastic measure, and in my opinion used too eagerly. Why not have a three year waiting period between the initial placement and the finalization of the adoption? That way authorities would have the power to to regularly monitor the welfare of an adopted child. This would actually help prevent some of those appalling abuses of which the ambassador speaks, since many abuse cases take place in the first year of placement.

SOME, not a "vast majority"

 Why not have a three year waiting period between the initial placement and the finalization of the adoption? That way authorities would have the power to to regularly monitor the welfare of an adopted child. This would actually help prevent some of those appalling abuses of which the ambassador speaks, since many abuse cases take place in the first year of placement.

At the risk of coming off as the Debbie-Downer here, I have to insert the unstudied fact that sexual abuse within the adoptive family will not necessarily take place within the first 1-3 years of placement.  However, SOME federal mandated follow-up is far better than NO federal mandated follow-up.  One could take the position that the longer a private adoption agency "investigates", the better, more child-friendly, that agency really is.

Maybe it may help some

You are no Debbie-Downer here. Sexual abuse of adoptees is probably the most under-estimated form of abuse that takes place, and is more likely to happen when the child is somewhat older. So you have a very valid point.

When it comes to lethal abuse/neglect, this happens in many cases within the first year, often even in the first few months. Examples among the Russian fatal cases include:

Chase Harrison (Dmitry Yakovlev) (adopted three months prior to his death)
Nicolai Emelyantsev (adopted one month prior to his death)
Isaac Jonathan Dykstra (adopted three months prior to his death)
Nina Hilt (Viktoria Valeryevna Bazhenova) (adopted 18 month prior to her death)
Alex Pavlis (Alexei Vasilovich Geiko) (adopted 6 weeks prior to his death)
Liam Thompson (Dmitry Sergeyvich Islankulov) (adopted 5 months prior to his death)
Jessica Albina Hagmann (adopted less than a year prior to her death)
Maria Anastasia Bennett (adopted nine months prior to her death)
Sacha Vallée (adopted 14 months prior to his death)
Zachary Higier (Nikita Khoryakov) (adopted 9 months prior to his death)
Jacob Lindorff (adopted 6 weeks prior to his death)
Luke Evans (adopted 6 months prior to his death)
Viktor Alexander Matthey (Viktor Sergievich Tulimov) (adopted 10 months prior to his death)
Logan Higginbotham (adopted 7 months prior to his death)
David Polreis, Jr. (Konstantin Shlepin) (adopted 6 months prior to his death)

The fact that much of the lethal abuse takes place so soon after the adoption, is a good indicator that having a delayed finalization of the adoption would help prevent children from being killed.

Of course delayed finalization will not prevent all abuse from taking place, but it can help prevent the sort of cases that made American adoption from Russia so infamous. It may also have helped Masha Allen, the boy adopted by William Delos Peckenpaugh, the boys adopted by John Krueger. In these cases the children were intentionally adopted to be sexually abused.

Are There Specifics....

Are there any specific "things" that these children seem to have in common that triggered such ungodly wrath in the AP's as to cause them to kill?

And, likewise, are there specific "things" found in the AP's that are common enough to be labeled for future avoidance of these people?

Teddy

Commonalities

The thing most of the fatally abused adoptees have in common is a fragile skull. The vast majority of these children were less than three years old at the time of death. The realization that most of the fatal cases involve very young children (there are a few exceptions) and that the fatal abuse happened relatively soon after the adoption, disspells the theory that RAD or institutionalization plays a major role in triggering adoptive parents to harm their children.

This theory, often claimed by adoption "experts" like Adam Pertman and Tom DiFilippo, somehow lays the blame for their own death with the children. Had they not been so damaged, parents would not have become so desperate that they end up killing the child. As if killing adopters are somehow victims of circumstance instead of perpetrators of a heinous crime.

"...While there is no behavior that can excuse child abuse, Pertman said orphans in Russia are often institutionalized and, as a general rule, institutionalized children suffer higher rates of attachment and behavioral disorders.

"You can not live in an institution for years and suffer no consequences," he said. The answer, he said, lays with foreign countries minimizing damaging environments for the children and U.S. adoption agencies doing a better job of vetting and education potential adoptive parents.

from: abcnews.go.com

The institutionalization theory is part of the adoptions from Russia story, with bleak, large, Cold War-era, Eastern European orphanages.

However, If we look at the fatal cases from other countries, we see the exact same pattern.

China

Kairissa XingJing Mark (adopted 3 months prior to her death)
Adam Stein (adopted 5 months prior to his coma)
Lavender Banks (adopted 11 months prior to her death)
Kaitlyn Brosch (adopted 4 months prior to her death)
Emma Mei Alvey (Mei Fu Ping) (adopted 8 months prior to her death)
Mia Depaillat (adopted 1 year prior to her death)
Ellana Lin (adopted 2 months prior to her death)
Jessica Li McClure (adopted 6 months prior to her death)
Meghan Hawkins-Rusch (adopted 3 months prior to her death)

South Korea

Hei Min Chung (aka Chaeli Kyrie) (adopted 3 months prior to her death)
Kayla Erlandson (adopted 7 months prior to her death)
Wendy Kay Ott (adopted 7 months prior to her death)

Guatemala

Joshua Pinckney (adopted no more than two years prior to his death)
Enna Isabel Barreto (adopted no more than two years prior to his death)
Jackson Wingo (adopted 9 months prior to his death)
Gustavo Adolpho Hunt (adopted 4 months prior to his death)
Nathaniel Jacob Allen (adopted 10 months prior to his death)
Luis Malak (aka Joseph Malak Jr "Joey") (adopted 6 weeks prior to his death)

India

Rohit Chakravarthy (adopted no more than 10 months prior to his death)

El Salvador

Shaun Williams (adopted 2 years prior to his death)
Maria Catherine Ostlund (adopted less than a year prior to her death)
William G. Rohrer III "Billy" (Miguelito Alvarada) (adopted 3 months prior to his death)

Honduras

Christine Montalbano (adopted less than a year prior to her death)
Kyle Golebieski (adopted a year prior to his death)

Georgia

Cameron VanHyning (adopted 2 months prior to his death)

The story of Russian adoptions going terribly wrong, because of the horrible conditions in Russian orphanages is largely a figment of the imagination. There certainly are more fatalities among Russian adoptees than among adoptees from other countries, but given the age of most of the children, there cannot have been a long history of institutionalization. Most children were simply too young for that.

It is also striking that nearly all of the fatal abuse cases (both Russian and non-Russian), took place in the United States. Only two fatal abuse cases of adoptees are known outside the U.S.

So I think it's better to ask what is wrong with American adopters that they kill the children they just adopted, than to ask what is wrong with the children that they trigger their adoptive parents to kill?

The commonality found in all these cases is not institutionalization, fetal alcohol syndrome, or RAD, but American adopters.

American Adopters and another common-thread

By now, PPL readers may pick-up on the fact that I'm not a huge Perkman Pertman fan, however, he did bring up a poignant point often overlooked by those rushing, pushing, and facilitating ICAs.  The bold print in the following is my own edit:

In 12 of these cases, the mothers were directly accused in the deaths of their children, and in four cases, fathers were directly accused (one of the fathers committed suicide after killing his wife and two children). In the remaining two cases, both parents were accused. The victims were age 36 months or younger in 12 of the 18 cases (67%); the remaining children were between age 5 and 11 years. Nearly one third of these children died within 6 months of their adoptive placements, and more than one half of these deaths occurred within the 1st year after adoption. At least five families had simultaneously adopted another child, and in five other families, there was at least one other adopted child already living in the home. There have been five deaths in the New England area, two in New Jersey, two in Ohio, one each in Colorado, Indiana, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Illinois, Maryland, and Minnesota. In at least one case, the defense provided by the adoptive parent was that the child’s injuries were self-inflicted, due to severe behavioral disturbances such as reactive attachment disorder. In other cases, defendants claimed that the children had violent outbursts. In addition to these 18 children, at least two other internationally adopted children (residing in Sweden and Northern Ireland) allegedly have been killed by their parents; these children were adopted from the Czech Republic and Romania, respectively (Lazarova, 2006; Lewis, Cole, & Williamson, 2003). The number of internationally adopted children who have been seriously injured by their adoptive
parents is unknown.

Adoption has existed throughout recorded human history. In recent decades, national and international legal and social safeguards to protect adopted children have been widely promulgated. The vast majority of internationally adopted children thrive in their loving, supportive families. Their lives are immeasurably enriched by the opportunities provided by their families, far beyond what would have been possible if they had remained consigned to institutional care in their birth countries. These 18 cases of abuse and neglect are consequences of extreme circumstances and do not reflect the norm among families of internationally adopted children. However, pediatricians and other professionals caring for internationally adopted children must be especially vigilant in identifying parents who may be showing signs of depression, stress, or extreme disappointment. “Postadoption depression” is becoming more widely recognized and may even be more common than postpartum depression (Foli & Thompson, 2004). Whether postadoption depression contributed to these fatalities is unknown. However, the deaths of these children remind us that traveling a long distance to adopt a child does not prevent a susceptible parent from becoming abusive.

[From:  Child Maltreatment, Child Abuse Fatalities Among Internationally Adopted Children, 2007 ]

Since (at least) 2007, "Post Adoption Depression" has been an adoption-issue known to the smart  pro-adoption advocates preaching to Americans in Adoptionland.

Post Partum Depression has been one of the many reasons/excuses given to remove a child from his/her mother, making that mother "unfit"  and rendering that child "adoptable".  All of this label-changing has been done, (in theory), for one reason -- for the sake/safety, "best interest" of the child.

 I addressed this disturbing issue a while ago, in a different thread:

Something bothers me very much about this new-label made for AP's.  In the past, I know many children have been put in-care because the mother is depressed.  [The story about Joel Domingues comes to mind, and it makes me very sad to know a child had to suffer such terrible abuse because the drive to adopt is so huge.]  As one who suffered post-partum depression three times, I know how scary those first few weeks can be.  Lucky for me, I had an excellent gyno, fantastic pediatricians, and I knew what I was getting into before I agreed to put my body through the hormonal wringers known as pregnancy and motherhood..  Of course, few could prepare me for what I went through, but I chalk that up to good ol fashion unresolved adoption issues.... the kind few want to talk about when the adoptee becomes pregnant.   Nevertheless, I read stories about mothers with post-partum depression, and because of my own post-birth-history, I am able to feel a tremendous amount of empathy for those lost without a single clue.

I have trouble reading about adoption-related depression, because I'm not sure if that's a reason or an excuse to follow-through with an Adoption Disruption.  Either way, if the adoptive mother thinks SHE is depressed, what does she think (once she's feeling all better) that child sent-away is thinking day-after-day?

[From:  A reason or an excuse?, 2009 ]

Note what a fellow adoptee wrote, as a response to those who empathize with the "post-adoption depression" condition:

APs were already comparing the adoption process to a pregnancy before the term "post-adoption depression" came out.

Some  complains that "paper pregnancy" is even more difficult than usual pregnancy because it takes more than 9 months while others talk about the joy of having children "born in their heart".

On personal level, my adoptive mother always said she felt the pain of childbirth on the day of my arrival ( Ouch! ouch! poor mother, I was 9 years old and 45 pounds).

I don't deny post-adoption depression is a reality, but personally I don't like the term because it always brings the subject of postpartum depression. Then post-adoption depression, like postpartum depression, is all about the new mother having depression after giving "birth" to (adopting) a child.

Symptoms of depression might be the same in both cases, but in the case of post-adoption depression, there is not only the adoptive mother on the stage.

I'm not an adoptive mother, but I also have suffered of post-adoption depression as an adoptee. Particularly  during the six first months after my arrival, I wished to be dead, I cried and prayed silently each night to go back to my homeland, but nobody acknowledge my post-adoption depression. 
I was told by my birth sisters that our father died three years after losing me as liver disease by drinking too much. Maybe, my birth father have also suffered of post-adoption depression.

People and experts are failing to recognize that two other important members of the adoption triad might also be victim of post-adoption depression: the child and the birth parent.

[From:  Post-adoption depression vs postpartum depression ]

Those who choose to negect and abuse their ADOPTED children are so much worse than abusive bio-parents..... so MUCH WORSE, and we (adoptees) KNOW IT!

Maybe God can forgive... but ask how many abused/killed adoptees can forget AND forgive....

<choking heaving sob>

We are only human... and very capable of pure hate....a hate that gets hidden, and gets manifested in other, different, ways.

"Words of wisdom from an adoptee"

Quote- "I'm not an adoptive mother, but I also have suffered of post-adoption depression as an adoptee."
I wish that is something that all APs realize one day and the sooner the better. The AP may be happy and over joyed about the adoption, but the child may not be feeling the same thing. They may be nodding and smiling, they don't know what else to do with all the new strangers around them.
It takes sometimes years for the loss and the grief to be addressed and truly, never forgotten.

How about this...

Were there biological children in the homes where the Russian adopted children were murdered?  I still come back to the thought that AP's can NEVER love an adopted child as much/like they do their biological children.  Would it take less provocation to harm an adopted child than a bio child? The AP would surely make comparisons and find their own children less stressful.  I have no biological children and therefore can only presume from what I've seen.  I have nothing to compare mine to...

These are just thoughts from what I've observed over the years.

Teddy

Basic Instincts

I still come back to the thought that AP's can NEVER love an adopted child as much/like they do their biological children.  Would it take less provocation to harm an adopted child than a bio child?

I too always had the theory that it's easier for the parent to love/protect the bio-child more than the adopted child, however, I base my mini-theory on scent.

I know I have ALWAYS loved the way each and every one of my babies smelled.  [I could go into the freak-a-deek stories behind that, and how I had to come to terms with liking that earthy woman smell that when put into words, makes me want to vomit....]

However, bring me another child... and ask me to smell and kiss?  Uuuuuuuh, NO THANK YOU! 

<looking for tissue to blow my nose before I dive into the decontamination shower>

I'm SUPER sensitive to smell.... and I think if other mothers are honest, they would admit, they too are super-sensitive to a child's smell.

That smell makes a HUGE difference.... (that's my theory.)

New thoughts about adoption

Stick with me here. Compared to the decades many of us grew up in I have seen a shift in the other direction which is never good. Now the adoptee is the "preferred" child. The AP gets way more attention from adopting than from giving birth, giving birth to a child is soooo yesterday. Adoption is heralded as such a wonderful thing. What can be better than saving a poor orphan?? As adoption is promoted in the media, in churches and other religious groups it becomes a much sought after status if you will that clouds judgment and discernment in the adoption process (who cares where those cute babies are coming from?? they are ALL orphans afterall).

I am also seeing childless couples who adopt after years of being unable to conceive suddenly finding themselves pregnant. That part is nothing new, yet the bio child is sort of sloughed aside since the first baby (the one the AP's adopted and got all of the attention over) is the apple of their eye. I am not kidding about this, I have seen this play out more and more in adoption circles. It's another form of dysfunction in adoptive families.

That is not to say the reverse isn't also true, just a trend I have seen.

The Mega-Church connection...

For those that don't know, many adoption agencies that deal in inter-country adoption go to Mega-churches and "talk" to families. After the talk many families jump on the adopting bandwagon and sign up to adopt a child from Liberia, Congo or other places that they have no connection to. Little thought is really given to how prepared a 30 year old stay-at-home mom of 6 kids under the age of 10 can handle the needs of another child(ren), let alone an older child(ren) that has needs or is traumatized, needless to say the new eager AP has no experience or knowledge of minority issues in the US. I guess jumping on the bandwagon of adoption in these mega-churches is a way for some folks to gather brownie points with God, sadly...that is not reality.

Disturbing consequences that can result from a different reality

Ah, the "jump at the opportunity to make a great name for yourself" mode of APing.  Yea, like we adoptees can't see through that charade....

 I guess jumping on the bandwagon of adoption in these mega-churches is a way for some folks to gather brownie points with God, sadly...that is not reality.

Oh, there is a new-reality cropping-up more and more, as my Mega AP's stuck with mega problems and many unmet special needs post points-out.

What's old is new again

I am also seeing childless couples who adopt after years of being unable to conceive suddenly finding themselves pregnant. That part is nothing new, yet the bio child is sort of sloughed aside since the first baby (the one the AP's adopted and got all of the attention over) is the apple of their eye. I am not kidding about this, I have seen this play out more and more in adoption circles. It's another form of dysfunction in adoptive families.

First-borns are a tough act to follow, especially if the "difficult" first-born didn't turn out to be all that difficult (compared to the next child in-line).

In this sense, the children in warped home dynamics can never win because the parent(s) will always favor the easiest most talented (praise-worthy)... making all children develop a sense of sibling rivalry that's based on jealousy and a full sense of insecurity and "not being worthy".

You know you're in a dysfunctional family when the rules to favoritism change, and last year's discarded sea chum becomes this year's much desired filet mignon... or as it worked in my AP's house-o-fun, last year's Satan's Spawn becomes this year's Jesus in the second-coming, depending upon who says what, to whom, (and when).

Yea... that's fun to live with.... 

 

 

Thailand

Thailand has a system like this in place. Adoptions cannot be finalized until 6 months after placement and regular post placement supervision is mandatory.

I think the idea of 3 years post placement supervision makes a lot of sense.

Likewise most adoptions...

6 months, and sometimes a year are common requirements of time waited before finalization in a lot of countries.

I'm wondering why Guatemala, and some other countries, finalize the adoptions within the countries, making the parent re-adopt in the USA?  Could this be their way of washing their hands of their involvement with the adoptions? 

I like the idea of postponing the finalization and then having mandatory post placement supervision for years.  VietNam already requires information on each child until they are 18 years old.  BUT, if the parents divorce, or something else bad happens, like sexual abuse, which disrupts the whole family, the parents go their separate ways and no longer send pictures and updates.  And with VietNam and Guatemala shutting down so often, I imagine there are hundreds of families who just disappear.

Teddy

Reporters

 VietNam already requires information on each child until they are 18 years old.  BUT, if the parents divorce, or something else bad happens, like sexual abuse, which disrupts the whole family, the parents go their separate ways and no longer send pictures and updates.  And with VietNam and Guatemala shutting down so often, I imagine there are hundreds of families who just disappear.

Are these reports mandatory, or are they done on a volunteer basis?  I ask because I can easily see the really happy-to scrap-book mom/parent would be more than eager to send "proud updates" every Christmas and end of school year, and any time in-between, if given the word GO.  Some parents are like that. [I for one would need prozac the size of Canada to be like that...] Meanwhile, others are just not into the rah-rah look how we are doing update for others to read.

I'm inclined to believe those who report are the good noodles, the students who love to see their work on the teacher's front-board and in the local newletter for all to see.  Those are NOT necessarily the people child protectors need to watch all the time.  

It's the quiet ones.... what are they doing?  How does a watch-dog service get those quiet ones to report-back with updates on the adopted children?

PPR...

I have 3 adopted children from VietNam... it was mandatory; built into the post-placement requirements that pictures and a brief summary of the child's year: likes and dislikes, etc. be sent the first of December so the agency could put all of the information from many families in one box and send it.

I would assume that if a family refused to send the required information and pictures, they would not be considered to adopt again from the agency.

I am one who is quiet...  after my husband went to prison, I spent years in shock, and with PTSD;  NOT wanting to explain why my husband was no longer in the pictures.. After being sent the request from the agency, two years in a row, and not responding, they just quit sending the request.  People, IMO, do not send pictures and information directly to VietNam.

This is MY OWN experience I'm talking about; these are the requirements as of 5 years ago.  I do not know the requirements when the country is shut down...

Teddy

Voluntary

Most countries have a PPR system that is supposed to be mandatory, but there is no way to enforce it. Agencies regularly threaten adoptive families who are not in compliance, but what can they really do?

I am also seeing agencies fudge the PPR's to make it look like everything is rosy so the sending country will keep the referrals coming.

Fudging...

Like I've said before:  The SW stated that she "knew" what the countries wanted to hear, therefore, there would be no problem getting accepted."

Teddy

re: Guatemala Post Placement Visits and Readoption

The adoption is finalized in Guatemala IF the parent(s) visited the child prior to exiting PGN and the child arrives in the US on a IR-3 Visa (meaning automantic US citizenship).

Many states do not require parents to finalize the adoption in their state if the child came on a IR-3 Visa.

Yes it gets complicated.

Guatemala requires NO Post-Placement Visits. It never has made this a requirement. Maybe some agencies request fees from parents for a PPV but it may be due to their own requirements or state licensing or ...just to cover their butts. Even if a PPV report is made, there is NO ONE to send it to in Guatemala. After the child leaves the country, there is no follow-up.

For those that don't know, Guatemala is currently closed to US citizens thus no new referrals are being given, though in country adoptions (domestic) are being processed. US withdrew it's interest in an ICA pilot program with Guatemala. Please note that Guatemala is still processing in-process cases, however at a snail's pace, as no one wants to approve a case that may have irregular overtones. I am told.

When I adopted my son from

When I adopted my son from Guatemala, it was required to go to Guatemala to do the adoption (22 years ago).  I can see where some did not have to go, since I left Guatemala without my son because of Dysentery, and gave POA to a worker of another missionary, for her to do my interview and bring my son to the states.

Thank you for this up-dated information.

Teddy

Pound Pup Legacy