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FAMILY PROBLEM: 23 TEENAGERS

Date: 1994-09-18

Post-Tribune (IN)

Author: The Associated Press
Dateline: SHELBYVILLE

A pair of former missionaries trying to raise 28 Haitian children say the youngsters - 23 of whom are teenagers - are becoming difficult to handle.

"I am so afraid that by admitting I need some help I will lose my children," said Kathy Blackburn, who adopted the youngsters with her husband, Dan, and brought them back to the United States five years ago.

"I just don't know what else to do."

Two of the family's 17 boys have been arrested, one for stealing a television from a neighbor and one for criminal mischief and intimidation after pointing a BB pistol at another teenager, The Shelbyville News reported.

Shelby County Sheriff Mike Herndon said his department had received complaints and that officers were working with the family.

"If you consider the ratio, having two or three

'bad' teens out of 28 children is really not bad," the sheriff said. "But I am afraid people will think all of the children are bad because the ones with problems are not being addressed."

Nurse Testifies Boy's Burns Were Severe

Date: 1994-09-17

Tulsa World
Author: Patti Weaver; World Correspondent

STILLWATER - A Cushing nurse testified Friday she could not forget the screams of a 4-year-old boy whose foster mother is accused of scalding his feet and lower legs with hot water.

"He was crying `Please, please, take me out of the water,' " when he was brought into Cushing Regional Hospital emergency room at 11:30 p.m. Feb. 2, 1993, Dorothy Flaherty testified.

Flaherty, who said she has been a licensed nurse for 19 years, said "the burns on his feet - I couldn't forget them - the skin was peeling off."

Her testimony came in the second day of the trial of Anita June Franklin, 43, of Cushing, who for four months was the foster mother of Justin Fields. If convicted of abusing him, Franklin could receive life in prison.

The Department of Human Services placed Justin in foster care because his mother was in prison and his father could not take care of him, prosecutor Beth Pauchnik said.

BRITONS PLEAD IGNORANCE OF LAW IN ROMANIAN CASE

Date: 1994-09-15

THE SEATTLE TIMES

COUPLE ACCUSED OF TRYING TO SMUGGLE A BABY

Author: CAROL J. WILLIAMSLOS ANGELES TIMES
Dateline: BUCHAREST, ROMANIA

THE PROSECUTION OF a British couple in a smuggling case is expected to have a chilling effect on the illegal adoptions again plaguing Romania after a 1991 crackdown on the black-market baby trade.

BUCHAREST, Romania - A British couple accused of trying to smuggle a Romanian baby out of this country after paying $6,000 to shady brokers to obtain her insisted on the first day of their trial yesterday they didn't realize they were violating any law.

Bernadette and Adrian Mooney of Wokingham, England, are the first foreigners from among tens of thousands who have sought to adopt Romanian children to be charged with criminal conduct and threatened with jail time.

No verdict is expected in the case for at least two weeks as a lawyer for one of five Romanians being tried simultaneously with the Mooneys won an adjournment to call another witness.

Sexual assault trial ordered for Carder

Date: 1994-09-15

Already convicted of molesting 4 girls

JIM OKERBLOM
The San Diego Union-Tribune

A convicted child molester was ordered yesterday to stand trial in the sexual assault of Alicia Wade, whose father was charged with the crime before a genetic test cleared him.

Albert Carder Jr., who is in prison for molesting four girls in the same Navy housing complex where the Wades lived, was ordered by Municipal Judge Judith Hayes to stand trial on two counts of forcible child abuse and a third count of kidnapping in the May 8, 1989, attack on Alicia. The trial is to begin Sept. 28.

Carder, 28, faces a maximum sentence of 15 years to life in prison for each of the child-abuse counts, which could be added to a 25-year sentence he is already serving, said prosecutor Robert Eichler.

Carder's appointed attorney, Barton Sheela, said the case had already received enormous publicity and declined comment.

At the time of the assaults, Carder, an admitted methamphetamine abuser, was on probation as a registered sex offender for molesting two girls in San Luis Obispo.

ROMANIAN BABY TRAFFIC BORN OF POVERTY

Date: 1994-09-05

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (PA)
Author: ALISON MUTLER, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dateline: COSMESTI, ROMANIA

Five months ago, Gerghina and Alexandru Florea gave their 8-year-old son a gift they could not afford for their other nine children -- a hopeful future.

The Floreas consented to Vasile's adoption by a couple from Lincoln, Neb., to save him from life in a state institution where he had lived since birth
because the family couldn't afford to bring him home. Another Florea son, 2- year-old Marian, remains institutionalized for the same reason.

"I'm not happy about it," Mrs. Florea, 35, said as she nursed a 2-month- old son. "But what could we do?"

Romania's late dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, overthrown and executed in the 1989 revolution, tried to increase the population of 23 million by banning birth control and abortion.

His legacy, even though birth control and abortion have since been legalized, is limited sex education and crushing poverty that pushes some parents to give up their children for adoption -- legally in hopes of a better future, or illegally for money.

Clerk says mom told her boy fell from bunk bed

Date: 1994-09-03

Clerk says mom told her boy fell from bunk bed

When Darlene Bright came into the FHP Hospital, she laid her 3-year-old son on the Formica desktop, stepped back and told the admitting clerk the boy was unresponsive.

"She thought he had fallen out of his bunk bed," Susan Nakamura testified Friday."She was saying he's always falling down and hurting himself, that they were going to blame her for this."

A judge said Friday he had heard enough evidence to believe Bright was to blame for her son's death and ordered her to stand trial for murder.

An assistant medical examiner said the injuries that eventually killed Kameron Bright could not have been caused from any fall off of a bunk bed.

"Falls less than 10 feet produce fairly benign injuries," said Dr. Edward Leis. He said the boy would have had to fall several stories to receive such injuries or possibly was shaken followed by a severe blow to the head.

The Global Youth Academy

Date: 1994-09-01

September 1994 | Volume 52 | Number 1
The New Alternative Schools Pages 20-22

The Global Youth Academy
Alfred Alschuler and Stephen Myers

The students at an international traveling school bring back home to family, school, and community the lessons of global citizenship.

In Zimbabwe, 32 American teenagers on a worldwide learning and service tour cleaned the Harare bus depot. The crowd laughed at the foreigners, but then, one by one, they joined the students and stayed for talks about cultural differences in the nature of service. It was a naive, idealistic, and surprising experiment— the precise conditions for authentic learning about global citizenship.

The idea for global learning began with simple impulses: “What if we put a school on wheels,” and “Let's try it.” In 1972, summer bicycle tours began. In 1982, Steve Myers said, “Let's travel on a bus and make it part of a public school curriculum.”

BRICK WOMAN ADMITS KILLING ADOPTED SON, 3

Date: 1994-08-19

Author: DEBORAH COOMBE

A Brick Township woman pleaded guilty yesterday to aggravated manslaughter in the beating death of her 3-year-old adopted son.

Kathleen Kelly Golebieski, 38, told Superior Court Judge James N. Citta in Toms River that she could not remember inflicting the fatal injuries to Kyle Golebieski, but could not deny the state's evidence that she was responsible for his death from blows to the head.

When public defender Robert Tarver showed Golebieski photographs taken prior to the boy's autopsy, she admitted causing the bruises, in various stages of healing, on the boy's legs, back, arms, hands and face. After Golebieski called police to her home 2:42 p.m. July 30, 1993, an ambulance was called that transported the unconscious boy to the trauma unit at Jersey Shore Medical Center in Neptune. Kyle died the next morning without gaining consciousness.

Golebieski, who wore sunglasses and cried through most of the proceeding, pleaded guilty to an amended indictment in which a charge of murder was downgraded to aggravated manslaughter that included a count of endangering the welfare of a child.

JUDGE ALLOWS PICTURES OF FOSTER KIDS

Date: 1994-07-30

JUDGE ALLOWS PICTURES OF FOSTER KIDS

2 HANDICAPPED CHILDREN FOCUS OF CUSTODY DISPUTE

July 30, 1994
Janice Haidet
Dayton Daily News
       
A visiting judge is refusing to stop Kathleen and Timothy Carroll from allowing news media crews to photograph their adopted, handicapped youngsters.

In a decision filed Friday in Greene County Juvenile Court, Richard T. Cole said, "It was not established that any such activity has been detrimental to the children (so far)." Nor has it violated a policy of the Children Services Board, which prohibits children in foster care from participating in "publicity activities" without written consent of the parent or guardian, Cole said. Two of the Carrolls' five surviving adopted children - Samuel, 6, and Isaiah, 11 - have been in foster care for nearly a year, after Cole said the parents were unable to properly care for their special needs.

DEATH BY LETHAL REJECTION

Date: 1994-07-28

TAJUANA DAVIDSON'S NEW PARENTS HAD A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE TOWARD CHILDREN. FIVE MONTHS AFTER THE STATE PLACED HER WITH THEM, SHE WAS DEAD.

Paul Rubin
July 28, 1994

On March 18, 1992, Joquitta Palmer neatly completed a handwritten application to the State of Arizona. "We want a sibling for our son," the 29-year-old woman printed. "We know there are a lot of unwanted children and we want another one to love."
She and her husband, Cleveland, wanted to adopt a healthy, black baby girl. Asked to describe what they "could not accept" in a child, Joquitta Palmer wrote four words: "Mentally disturbed, drug baby."
In June 1993, the state Department of Economic Security approved the Palmers as the potential adoptive parents of TaJuana Davidson. That month, the 3-year-old joined the Palmers and their 9-year-old son, Brandon, at their Casa Grande home.

She was a playful child, full of laughter. But TaJuana also suffered from a variety of maladies. She was hyperactive and a slow learner. Ear infections plagued her, and a bad hip caused her to limp.

HOW CHILD-ABUSE CASES CAN BE PROSECUTED

Date: 1994-07-28

Paul Rubin

PROSECUTOR TELLS CARROLLS: NO MORE PICTURES

Date: 1994-07-27

PROSECUTOR TELLS CARROLLS: NO MORE PICTURES

LITTLE-KNOWN RULE COVERS CHILDREN

July 27, 1994
Todd R. Wallack
Dayton Daily News
       
Greene County prosecutors, angered by Timothy and Kathleen Carrolls' aggressive attempts to regain custody of their adopted children, reached deep into their legal tomes Tuesday to retaliate.

Citing an obscure Ohio administrative rule, prosecutors say the Cedarville parents went too far when they allowed the media to take pictures of their kids during visits. "They're exploiting the children," said Suzanne Schmidt, the assistant county prosecutor who filed a motion to bar such pictures in the future. "Our rules do not permit (it)."

The Carrolls, whose two handicapped children were placed into foster care following the suspicious deaths of four siblings, vigorously deny the charges.

"The cameras don't bother the children," Mrs. Carroll said. "They jump up and down to get on TV. If it was upsetting to them, we would have stopped it."

ROBBING THE CRADLE

Date: 1994-07-26

Some fundamentalist-run pregnancy centers are no longer satisfied talking women out of abortion. Now they want the babies

Marc Cooper
The Village Voice

On April 14, 1991, 19-year-old Lea Tyler lay down in the bathroom of her University of California dorm. She thought she was sick. Forty-five minutes later, sitting in a pool of blood, Lea gave birth to a six-weeks-premature baby girl. At that moment Lea felt totally alone. Her pregnancy had been secret. She had been afraid to tell her parents--her traditionalist mother was away in Japan tending to Lea's ailing grandmother; her father was having problems with work. Lea had gone to the university health center, but was told it offered no prenatal care. She had even kept her secret from her classmates, fearful that in this liberal Northern California town she would be pressured to abort. She feared other counseling services, like Planned Parenthood, might tell her the same thing. Lea was determined to keep her baby. She was planning to marry her longtime boyfriend--and only confidant--Matt Darrah, himself a student at UC San Diego. But he was 500 miles away.

Smuggled baby lands British couple in Romanian jail

Date: 1994-07-19

The Washington Times

Police speculate case is part of larger trafficking ring

Author: Peter Humphrey; REUTERS NEWS AGENCY

BUCHAREST, Romania - A British couple have been charged with attempting to smuggle a 5-month-old baby girl out of the country, and they are unlikely to be freed on bail.

Police spokesman Col. Dan Secrieru said the pair were charged with violating border and adoption laws.

The couple, identified by a British official as Adrian and Bernadette Mooney from Berkshire, England, are being held in cells at Bucharest police headquarters.

Police said last week that in addition to the two Britons, three Romanians were under arrest on suspicion of baby trafficking, and that the net might be cast wider.

"There is a possibility that if they apply for bail it might not be allowed because of the fact that Romanians are also involved in the case and that there might be a network involved," Col. Secrieru said.

The case underlines the fate of tens of thousands of unwanted Romanian infants.

`FAMILY' REUNION ROMANIAN ADOPTEES, PARENTS CELEBRATE

Date: 1994-07-10

St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Author: By Patrick E. Gauen Of the Post-Dispatch Staff

Alex Henn toddled up the paths of Grant's Farm on Saturday without paying any particular attention to Hanna Totman, bouncing along right ahead of him. Just a year ago, they were close neighbors.

They were hand-holding close, in fact, comforting each other through the slats of adjacent cribs in a Hungarian orphanage, where their futures - and survival - were in question.

Now they have new parents for comfort, and American homes for security. While their beds today are 1,000 miles apart, Alex and Hanna will always keep in touch, if their adoptive mothers and fathers have their way.

That's why the parents of 19 children gathered in St. Louis this weekend for what their T-shirts proclaimed was a "Gotcha Day Celebration." That's as in, "It's been a year since I got you."

These children, among 28 who started their lives in Romania, are 18 months to 4 years old, so they are not likely to remember much about the weekend here. But they may remember the next reunion or the one after that.

Pound Pup Legacy